Repost: A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique

July 23, 2013 · Print This Article

The following article has been circulating around the art-internet of late and I thought I’d repost it here for your consideration.

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A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique

written by Prolapsarian

Dear Goldsmiths Art Students, I attended your MFA show two nights ago. I apologise to an extent: with so many artworks on display it was difficult to digest any of them. That situation was exacerbated by the fact that so few of the works seemed to have it in them to behave destructively towards the others. Maybe this is where I can begin: that the type of co-operation between artworks, their intellectual co-ordination, is something I find troubling. It didn’t seem to me to be the co-operation of a school thinking together, but instead the co-ordination of the school uniform, of a discipline that had been so fully internalised that all of the artworks, under its authority, might comfortably coalesce. That made those artworks difficult to be with. I want to write to you about a single gesture that was performed by a great majority of the artworks in the show (although there were some important exceptions). It is a gesture that claims to determine a relation between artworks and “capitalism”. It is of no surprise that under the contemporary situation of global capital, undergoing its most profound crisis in eighty years – creating conditions not only of mass destitution but also of mass resistance and protest – that the relation between art and capital would present itself more explicitly in the new works of art than has been the case in the last decades. But the expression of this relation of art and capital in the work displayed at your show was not only predictable, but questionable on both political and aesthetic grounds. The gesture that I refer to is that of artworks that attempt to parody capitalism, and in this parody hope to effect a critical irony through the apparent distance between the artwork (and its social situation) and the forms of commodity or capital that it parodies. In this gesture the artwork proclaims a radicalism, a dissatisfaction with the actually existing. It proclaims that the object of this dissatisfaction is “capitalism”. The modes of making explicit the structure of parody are plural: some take up the bathetic disjunction through a fully instrumental comparison with some hazy far-away classicism or humanism; others exaggerate the shoddiness of capital’s products; others rely on a revelatory mode whereby it is claimed something of capital’s seamy underbelly is exposed; while others are just bits of fixed capital – most often employing the high technologies of marketing – transposed into the gallery-space. But the gesture of this parody common to all of them will, I imagine, be familiar to you. read more

3 Responses to “Repost: A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique”

  1. [...] Is the art work critical of capitalism on display at the Goldsmith’s MFA show actually complicit with it?  “A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique” [Prolapsarian via Bad at Sports] [...]

  2. [...] I want to write to you about a single gesture that was performed by a great majority of the artworks… [...]

  3. [...] I want to write to you about a single gesture that was performed by a great majority of the artworks… [...]

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