Episode 475: Sweet Home Alabama

October 6, 2014 · Print This Article

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This week: Amanda Browder rocking like a hurricane! Amanda visits Alabama for her installation Magic Chromacity. Amanda talks to artists Lillis Taylor and Doug Barrett!

Here is info on some of the cool stuff AB is about these days:

Magic Chromacity –

Amanda Browder was commissioned by the Department of Art and Art History and The Alys Stephens Center at University of Alabama at Birmingham to create a large scale fabric installation on the two buildings. Lauren Garber Lake is the director of the Art and Art History Dept who helped bring Amanda.

She had numerous public sewing days and a ton of fabric was donated by the people of Birmingham to sew the over 10,000 square feet of fabric in the project.

Sewing Days – many people from the community and specifically the Bib & Tucker Sewing Co-op that is run by Lillis Taylor who is interviewed today on BAS.

Magic = Magic City (Birmingham nickname)
Chroma + City (color + city)

It was up on Aug 29th on the Abroms Engel Institute for the Visual Art building and The Alys Stephens Center. These buildings were across the street from each other.

Amanda has made a print for the project . It is made with the help of Doug Barrett, Associate prof of Graphic Design from UAB who is also interviewed.

Here

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Montana Show!
Here

Montana Museum of Arts and Culture , called “End of the Infinite,” will run from Oct. 16 to Jan. 10, 2015
– amanda’s mini-retrospective.

Show three building pieces, Rapunzel, Good Morning! and Future Phenomena. Plus an interior piece PRISM/LIVIN/ROOM that will be in the gallery til Jan.

Last week they showed Rapunzel in downtown Missoula on the Mercantile building during First Friday.

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Triumvirate!

at the Pelham Arts Center, Pelham NY

This will be an outdoor installation with fabric. The piece is a more energtic and vivacious piece compared to previous pieces. It works with the triangle forms and is also made from the donations at Pelham. This piece will be up Nov 14th.

More about Triumvirate!
November 14, 2014 – January 3, 2015
Triumvirate! is a multi-colored site-specific fabric installation that will hang on the facade of the Pelham Art Center, in Pelham NY. Using donated fabrics from Pelham and the surrounding areas, Triumvirate! will be a visual statement that buildings are not separate from the democratic life and spirit of the community.

The piece, referencing the three dimensional rectangular building, will be constructed from fabric donated by the residents of Pelham and assembled in public sewing day workshops. The immutable scale of the building is dramatized by the scale and independence of the triangles as well as the dimensional ambiguity of the fabric. The design creates a “shock of the new” with both color and form. As a collective we will rejoice in how something as small as a piece of discarded fabric can be rebuilt into an energetic architectural installation.




Najia Bagi: Playing art and making music

June 30, 2014 · Print This Article

najia baby art club

If you think the regular art crowd can be critical, spare a thought for Najia Bagi. The Manchester based musician and artist has been making work for babies. Now that’s a tough gig.

Baby Art Club is a collaboration with Naomi Kendrick at Manchester City Art Gallery. The duo have prepared multi-sensory installations based on current exhibitions. Lots of work goes into these and the audience may fail to respond at all.

“The first time I did baby art club was really difficult,” she tells me via phone. “They don’t do anything. They don’t really move around very much and they don’t want to create anything.” The audience were, as she says, “Incredibly challenging”

“I just thought, What do you do with these tiny little creatures who don’t want to make anything and don’t understand words!” And where verbal communication isn’t possible, received ideas about art go out the window.

Yet Bagi and Kendricks have perservered, creating stimulating environments which, thanks to their strong aesthetic sensibilities, rightly belong in a gallery. “Then you just watch what the babies do and whatever they do is right.”

If times get tough, Bagi has musical talents to fall back on. “I’ve twice played my guitar and sang, and had these really magical moments where tiny babies sing with me, making noise,” she tells me.

“But I felt like I had a lot more to learn from them than they did from me.” It is soon clear that Bagi is “genuinely interested” in child development. And the gallery treat her and Kendrick as artists, rather than educators.

So when the progressive Manchester venue wanted sound art to accompany a show of paintings of the Scottish Highlands, one half of Baby Art Club was right in the frame. “I was surprised at how well it worked,” she says of her evening event.

“One woman was in there for 45 minutes and people were standing in front of each painting for a really long time. They were allowing themselves to be absorbed.” One happy visitor described the experience as painting in four dimensions.

Thanks to mics, headphones and 150 objects (mostly spoons), the busy sound artist is currently adding an extra dimension to the family space at Tate Liverpool. The benefits, unlike most of those in art, are tangible

“In terms of being in an installation or in an art gallery with sound, you know that the other person in the same space is hearing what you’re hearing,” she points out. “And that creates a form of human connection which is really good for wellbeing”.

Next on the agenda could be a public artwork in the form of an interactive sound sculpture. Bagi has been inspired by the Scandinavian origins of the adventure playground, which, in the 1940s, were called Junk Playgrounds.

“It’s completely unthinkable now. You couldn’t do it because of health and safety but it was amazing. There were hammers and nails and tyres and nails and wood and saws and bricks”.

Bagi’s art playground will, of course, be a much safer space but she is still excited about the chance for kids to respond to the landscape buy creating sound. She envisions this project being realised in a central outdoor space in either Liverpool or Manchester.

“In my head they’re creating sound art and I would say it like that, but in their heads they’re just having a great time.” And that’s how to make art for people who have no interest in art.




Episode 401: Tony Labat

May 6, 2013 · Print This Article

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Tony Labat
This week: Brian and Patricia meet with artist Tony Labat who tries to teach PM how to roll her R’s.

Tony Labat was born in Cuba and came to the United States at the age of 15 in 1966. He has exhibited internationally over the last 30 years. Labat has received numerous awards and grants and his work is in many private and public collections. Labat has developed a body of work in Performance, Video, Sculpture and Installation. His work has dealt with and continues his investigations with the body, popular culture, identity, urban relations, politics, and the media.

This week has musical nods to the untimely passings of Kriss Kross’s Chris Kelly and Slayer’s Jeff Hanneman.




Episode 349: Suzanne Lacy

May 7, 2012 · Print This Article

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Suzanne Lacy (born 1945) is an internationally known artist, educator, writer, and former public servant. She describes her work, which includes “installations, video, and large-scale performances”, as focusing on “social themes and urban issues.” She also served in the education cabinet of Jerry Brown, then mayor of Oakland, California, and went on to become an arts commissioner for the city.




Episode 321: Pablo Helguera

October 24, 2011 · Print This Article

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This week: More Open Engagement “SoPra”! This week we talk to Pablo Helguera!

Pablo Helguera (Mexico City, 1971) is a New York based artist working with installation, sculpture, photography, drawing, and performance. Helguera’s work focuses in a variety of topics ranging from history, pedagogy, sociolinguistics, ethnography, memory and the absurd, in formats that are widely varied including the lecture, museum display strategies, musical performances and written fiction.

His work as an educator intersected his interest as an artist, making his work often reflects on issues of interpretation, dialogue, and the role of contemporary culture in a global reality. This intersection is best exemplified in his project, “The School of Panamerican Unrest”, a nomadic think-tank that physically crossed the continent by car from Anchorage, Alaska to Tierra del Fuego, making 40 stops in between. Covering almost 20,000 miles, it is considered one of the most extensive public art projects on record.

Pablo Helguera performed individually at various museums and biennials internationally. In 2008 he was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and also was the recipient of a 2005 Creative Capital Grant. Helguera worked for fifteen years in a variety of contemporary art museums. Since 2007, he is Director of Adult and Academic programs at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

He is the author, amongst several other books, of The Pablo Helguera Manual of Contemporary Art Style (2005), a social etiquette manual for the art world; The Boy Inside the Letter (2008) Theatrum Anatomicum ( and other performance lectures) (2008), the play The Juvenal Players (2009) and What in the World (2010).