Episode 559 Sam Hertz

August 31, 2016 · Print This Article

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Sound and Performance Artist Sam Hertz checks in on the Anthropocene and the Aerocene with Caroline Picard!

They carve away at our conceptions around Knowledge Production, Shamanism and Science, the Technosphere, Perception Structures, and various Epistemologies.

They also swing through the work of Thomas Saroceno, the Rain Room, and Sianne Ngai all while utilizing the ambiguous device to create a stanch autopoetic… Dig mother fucker, we are getting down at the House of World Cultures.
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Episode 558: Jenni Nurmenniemi

August 25, 2016 · Print This Article

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Finnish Curator Jenni Nurmenniemi and Caroline Picard rock it out with a wide ranging conversation about specialized residencies, Animism, copper, mining, systems of belief, magical thinking, ecological residencies, and the green Earth trilogy.

Links, images, and a little more robust show notes will come tomorrow. (update) it did not. Here are a few relevant links…

Frontiers in Retreat

ANIMISM

The Green Earth Trilogy

Magical Thinking

 

Episode 557: Bolen, Scott, and Yang take on Sensing and the Anthropocene

August 10, 2016 · Print This Article

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Jeremy Bolen, Emily Eliza Scott, and Andy Yang take on Sensing and the Anthropocene at the HKW in Berlin! We nerd out MoFos. With the brilliant Caroline Picard.

From their abstract…

With a critical eye to what aesthetics in/of/through the Anthropocene might mean, we will engage with ways that established forms of perceiving might be transformed in the broadest sense—toward new sensitivities of the long now, and the emergent technosphere that conditions our understanding of it.

“Aesthetics” is often understood as a matter of beauty or style, but the Anthropocene pushes us to reconsider the word’s original meaning (from Greek): to perceive by the senses or by the mind; to feel. Ideas of the Anthropocene have been shaped by a technospheric net of innumerable satellites, cameras, and detectors, resulting in an aesthetic regime composed of data that has been used to narrate profound changes to climate, landscape, and biodiversity over the past 400 years. But what comes after the GIS image? If quantification, abstraction, and the logic of evidential traces have been the means by which we’ve largely come to recognize our purported Anthropocene condition, then the question becomes how we might proceed so that our “sensing” is less “remote,” and forge aesthetics that incorporate not only the representational, but also the lived and affective experiences of various anthropo-scenes.

This workshop will pull at the aesthetics of the Anthropocene as they already exist, and as they might still be invented, exploring how we move from the analysis of specimens into integrated and dynamic forms of participation beyond spectatorship or mere comprehension. Through facilitated, small-group exercises and presentations the seminar will examine influential tropes (e.g. utopic, dystopic, photographic, metric, etc.) and ways that the Anthropocene reinforces or disrupts our default visual languages, and the definition of “aesthetics” itself. Engaging performance, para-fictional research, and design as well as visual art practices, this seminar aspires to mobilize aesthetics beyond the picture plane.

 

Names Dropped:

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Episode 556: Michael Rakowitz Part 2

August 2, 2016 · Print This Article

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Michael Rakowitz is a Chicago based artist whos works have appeared in venues worldwide including dOCUMENTA (13), P.S.1, MoMA, MassMOCA, Castello di Rivoli, the 16th Biennale of Sydney, the 10th Istanbul Biennial, Sharjah Biennial 8, Tirana Biennale, National Design Triennial at the Cooper-Hewitt, and Transmediale 05. He has had solo exhibitions at Tate Modern in London, Lombard Freid Gallery in New York, Alberto Peola Arte Contemporanea in Torino, and Kunstraum Innsbruck.

The works find their roots across history, architecture, and cultural exchange. They ask us to play remote witness to atrocity and triumph as we are made complicit in the challenges and trials of a globalized world.

Check out his current exhibitions at the Graham Foundation and Rhona Hoffman Gallery.

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Episode 555: Michael Rakowitz

July 28, 2016 · Print This Article

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This week: The amazing stupendous Michael Rakowitz!!

In a interrogative two part episode (555 and 556) we talk with Michael Rakowitz about the core of his practice and the evolution of his concerns.

Michael Rakowitz is a Chicago based artist whos works have appeared in venues worldwide including dOCUMENTA (13), P.S.1, MoMA, MassMOCA, Castello di Rivoli, the 16th Biennale of Sydney, the 10th Istanbul Biennial, Sharjah Biennial 8, Tirana Biennale, National Design Triennial at the Cooper-Hewitt, and Transmediale 05. He has had solo exhibitions at Tate Modern in London, Lombard Freid Gallery in New York, Alberto Peola Arte Contemporanea in Torino, and Kunstraum Innsbruck.

The works find their roots across history, architecture, and cultural exchange. They ask us to play remote witness to atrocity and triumph as we are made complicit in the challenges and trials of a globalized world.

Part 2: Here