What We Talk About When We Talk About Funk

February 13, 2013 · Print This Article

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This month’s On Moves YouTube Round-Up is about FUNK.  There’s no Funkadelic or Parliament because this isn’t about painting a portrait, it’s about juicing a feeling.  It’s not about a history lesson, what’s essential, or what’s relevant, accurate, etc. etc.  This is my own public research into the nature of Funk and you’re just along for the ride.  Is this an overshare studio diary kind of thing?  Some West-Coast feelings-meditation-slime-spill?  Probably.

Within the last few weeks, any number of people with the misfortune to be saved in the address book of my bargain bin cell phone have received brief text messages about Funk.  These messages are a sentence or less, a word, an idea, never an image because my phone can’t do that.  These Funk-waves from the void are research, like I said.  Rather than take notes in my sketchbook, I’m taking notes in our telecomfriendship.

Am I trying to find out what Funk really “IS” beyond just a genre of music?  Not really, I’m secure in my relationship to the Funk but I think I’m playing with it now, using it as a raw material, a building block towards something.  Where it comes from or who does it best and truest are irrelevant for my purposes and I believe for the purposes of intentional Funking everywhere.  It’s a conundrum.  As Bootsy says in “The Pinocchio Theory:” “If you fake the funk, your nose will grow.”  But Bootsy, if you won’t tell me what it is how do I know if I’m faking it?

Oh, well, if you say so.  Let’s look at some more examples of technique from Bernard Purdie and Buddy Hankerson (Slave, Aurra, Young & Co, etc.).

 

 

 

Uh-huh and now let’s look at this stuff in action, chronologic-ish.

 

I’ll be expecting your report.

xo
sd




Play By Play : What to Expect in the Coming Months

January 18, 2013 · Print This Article

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I came on as the Managing Editor of the Bad at Sports blog about a month ago. It’s been an exciting turn and I hope to do well by it. A few people have asked what my vision going forward is, and I thought I might say something about it here. I hope to continue reflecting on the dynamic energy in Chicago’s contemporary art world while connecting to conversations and aesthetic agendas in other cities and disciplines. That agenda was set in place a while ago and I believe I can continue to guide and focus that intention. There is room for experimentation in that vision, which seems necessary to me. Bad at Sports has never presented a tidy, singular package and as such, I believe it would go against the nature of the project to filter content and tone through a single, editorial lens. Its roots in independent, DIY and Punk Rock collectivism remain at the heart of the project’s vitality and the blog is a platform for unique and individual voices that pass through the subject of contemporary art and culture. As such it becomes a nexus of concerns and responses to culture at large. That is something I hope to preserve under my stewardship. As an artist-run forum, Bad at Sports has the unique capacity to reflect on a host of subjects, exposing the intellectual, aesthetic and social networks that define and subsequently influence cultural production. I believe it is our job to explore and discuss the contexts we inhabit. In doing so, we further establish a living touchstone and future archive of contemporary discourse.

Some changes should be apparent already — others will fall into place like pieces of a puzzle in the coming months. The process is organic, but I’ve been trying to set up a casual, thematic architecture  that unfolds over the course of a given week. Eventually, I hope to schedule two posts a day, one before 2pm and one after. Built in to this, is room for special occasions and guest writers — those posts would either go live in the evenings, or fill in existing gaps. To that end I’ve been inviting a number of new writers, many of whom I have admired for a long time.

Here is something of a loose schedule:

Mondays: Essays and reflections from old favorites Jeriah Hildewin, Shane McAdams and Nicholas O’Brien — writers who have been posting with consistent dedication. In addition, I’m excited to announce a new bi-weekly column by Dana Bassett, whom you may know for her ACRE Newsletters.

Tuesdays are dedicated to three subjects: Performance, Social Practice, Language (or the performance thereof) and Object Oriented Ontology. Confirmed participants include longstanding contributor Abigail Satinsky and Mary Jane Jacob (Social Practice), Anthony Romero and João Florêncio (performance), Gene Tanta (language), Robert Jackson (OOO).

On Wednesdays, we will read about artists and art in other cities. The following writers will post on rotation: Jeffery Songco is covering the Bay Area, Sam Davis continues to represent Bad at Sports’ Los Angeles Bureau, Sarah Margolis-Pineo is writing about Portland. Juliana Driever will be relaying posts, interviews and artist profiles about New York, and then we’ll bring it back to the Midwest with Kelly Shindler’s dispatch from St. Louis, and Jamilee Polson Lacy writing about Kansas City.

Thursdays herald our illustrious Stephanie Burke’s Top 5 Weekend Picks and a new monthly contribution from author/translator Johannes Göransson whose writing you can also find here.

Fridays have been set aside for art reviews and artist profiles with contributions from Danny Orendoff, Monica Westin, Abraham Ritchie and myself.

WEEKENDS will feature a range and flux of the above, plus Brit Barton’s Endless Opportunities, cultural reflections and short essays by Terri Griffith, continued posts from Jesse Malmed, in addition to a monthly contribution from the newly confirmed Bailey Romaine and Adrienne Harris.

My last note is this — there is room in this schedule for additional posts, posts that would feature special events, festivals and conferences in the city. That space would also be available to, at times, connect the blog and the podcast. As a first indication of this, we will be highlighting IN>TIME, a performance festival that is going on as we speak, from January until March.

Otherwise if you have any comments, suggestions or, even guest posts you would like to submit, please feel free to contact me at: caroline@lanternprojects.com




Top 5 Weekend Picks (10/14-10/16)

October 13, 2011 · Print This Article

1. Alberto Aguilar & Michelle Harris at Roots and Culture

Roots and Culture, 1034 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday 6-9pm.

2. dream, in, the, act at Kunz, Vis, Projects

Curated by Nicholas Steindorf, with work by Tom Costa, EJ Hill, Betsy Odom, Industry of the Ordinary, Mary Mattingly, Rusty Shackleford, Joey Weiss and Darren Will.

Kunz,Vis,Projects, 2324 w. Montana, in the garage. Reception Friday 6-9pm.

3. Subterranean Isle at Shane Campbell Gallery

Work by Jay Heikes.

Shane Campbell Gallery, 673 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Saturday 6-8pm.

4. SAIC Undergraduate Exhibition at the Sullivan Galleries

Work by Josef Aguilar, Michelle Anderson, Emilie Bennett-Kjenstad, Daniel Bertner, Alexandra Calhoun, Sarah Campbell, Edward Chong, Esther Chow, Tory Christopherson-Sommerfeldt, Francisco Cordero-Oceguera, Jessee Crane, Kristina Daignault, Theodore Darst, Sam Davis, John Deardourff, Stephanie Del Carpio, Claire Demos, Ben Dimock, Lara Dorsett, Kait Doyle, Jay Fernandez, Brandy Fisher, Charles Fogarty, Jasmine Grant, Christopher Grieshaber, Alison Groh, Yo Ahn Han, Zachary Harvey, Caitlin Hennessy, Danielle Jacklin, William Joyce, Ellie Younjeong Jung, Matthew Keable, Cindy Myung Jin Kim, Minkyung Kim, Elizabeth Kovach, Hyun Jee Kwon, Youjeong Kwon, Melissa Leandro, Christina Joorie Lee, Kang Hoon Lee, Kyusun Lee, Sulhwa Lee, Sarah Legow, Jiyeon Lim, Matthew Litwin, Elyse Mack, Elizabeth Mallery, Mark Mcwilliams, Caroline Moody, Alicia Moreno, Mara Mullen, Drew Noble, Eileen O’Donnell, Alp Oz, Mark Palmen, Jiha Park, Kaitlin Patterson, Heather Platen, Lou Regele, Thomas Roland, Camila Rosas, Nathan Scealf, Nicholas Schleicher, Jules Schmid, Noelle Sharp, Sam Sieger, Kollin Strand, Eric Tai, Geoffrey Thais, Claire Valdez, Sarah Welch, and Nayeon Yang.

Sullivan Galleries, School of the Art Institute, 33 S. State St., 7th fl. Reception Friday 6-8pm.

5. There is a Wanderlust Growing in Your Bones at Rotofugi Gallery

Work by Daniel Danger.

Rotofugi Gallery, 2780 N. Lincoln Ave. Reception Friday 7-10pm.