“Ferris Bueller” at BelieveInn

June 4, 2009 · Print This Article

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I recently had a chance to check out part of  BelieveInn’s “Out of Towners” lineup, their current show, Ferris Bueller, featuring work from Porous Walker, with Gabe Levinson and Timothy Pigott. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off was, coincidentally, the first (and probably the last) film I ever enjoyed on LaserDisc.

San Francisco–based Porous Walker said that he wanted  to bring to life parts of the film “that were never seen.” When I asked him why this film in particular, he said “Because it’s a great film, that’s all, simple.  And because I knew Camerons house was going on the market so I hoped the two could somehow mesh and help promote.” Artists with heart, that is what I like to see.

The BelieveInn space is the lower half of a house set back from the street. Three of the walls (and the ceiling) of the tiny immaculate front room was filled with Walker’s drawings, which are pretty damn funny caricatures of naked women with sagging breasts and hair clips, and naked men with either very large, or very small, penises. Clean in form and raunchy in content, the illustrations are like the jokes that come right after fart jokes but before you find your dads Playboy. And who doesn’t think about the cashiers at Trader Joe’s without their clothes on, really?


Gabe Levinson and Timothy Pigott’s work was orderly installed on one wall, adding a nice grid counterbalance to the rest of the room. Pigott’s portraits of “Characters Not in the Movie”, consisted of head shot sketches of dweeby men referencing different details of the film. Levinson’s piece, “Dudes Thinking About Dudes”, were depictions of just that, kind of a one liner homo joke framed in construction paper.

Overall, the show feels like an articulate, very naughty boy’s bedroom, and can pretty much be summed up in Levinson’s paper plane installation instructions: 1) Tear out a page 2)Make a paper airplane 3)Aim it at someone’s head 4) Don’t apologize.

I missed the opening of this show, but I’m planning on catching the closing on June 21st from 1-4 pm.




Little Red Riding Hood Told By Engineers

April 4, 2009 · Print This Article

Batmobama & Robiden

October 17, 2008 · Print This Article

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Grudge Match From Way Back

September 19, 2008 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports Boxing Match
If you ever wondered when Bad at Sports really started it was not in 2005. In reality it was in 1896 Richard’s GG Grandfather Josiah Holland and Duncan’s GG Grandfather Cyrus MacKenzie meet at a bar in St. Louis, MO both having tried to get the postal digits of a young barmaid. Both having struck out and blaming each other for the result the grudge that has lasted the centuries began.

Over 100 years later it has come to a head again. This time over the use of the word webby and interweb but this time only one can survive.

Who will win, vote this weekend and see.
Bad at Sports Boxing Richard HollandBad at Sports Boxing Duncan MacKenzie

Oh also that barmaid that won the hearts but not hand of our two hosts? Turns out she was the GG Grandmother of Christopher Hudgens, one Temperance Hudgens. Kaveh Soofi was the photographer who captured this epic moment in Art grudge history.




Episode 157: Ivan Brunetti

August 31, 2008 · Print This Article

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Bad at Sports Comic

First, Duncan sleepily laments about Richard waking him up at 1 in the afternoon, as this is “early” in McKenzie.

Next: FIGHT NIGHT IS ON PEOPLE!!!! Start training now. Bad at Sports calls dibs on Tony Fitzpatrick to be our collective trainer, you can’t have him.

THEN the main event: This week Anna Kunz drops in to aid Duncan in interviewing Ivan Brunetti about his works (Misery Loves Comedy, Haw, Schizo…) and the collections that he has been publishing with Yale University Press (An Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Cartoons, and True Stories:Volume 1 and 2.)
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