Episode 363: Hrag Vartanian & Hyperallergic

August 13, 2012 · Print This Article

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This week: Hyperallergic founder Hrag Vartanian live from NADA.

 

Hyperallergic is a forum for serious, playful and radical thinking about art in the world today.

Created by husband-and-husband team, Veken Gueyikian and Hrag Vartanian, Hyperallergic officially launched on October 14, 2009. It combines the best of art blog and magazine culture by focusing on publishing quality and engaging writing and images from informed and provocative perspectives.

The site was the winner of Best Art Blog at the 2011 Art & Reality Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia.

In 2011 alone, Hyperallergic was featured on major media outlets around the world, including television stations, like Al Jazeera, radio stations, like WNYC and 97X, newspapers, like New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, the Guardian, The Art Newspaper, Poland’s Onet Wiadomości, Hungary’s Origo and Israel’s Ynet.co.il, magazines and journals like The Nation, Art News, Italy’s Internazionale, The Brooklyn Rail, and not to mention dozens of websites, including Boing Boing, Kottke, Andrew Sullivan, Felix Salmon, CNN.com, Huffington Post, Memeorandum, Gothamist, Gawker, Kotaku, FoxNews.com, NBCSports.com, PSFK, Brooklyn365 and The Stranger’s Slog.

Hyperallergic also publishes a Weekend edition edited by leading writers and journalists. It offers a closer look at issues in art, books, films, theatre, dance and music.

In addition to the blogazine, our fast-growing Hyperallergic LABS is one of the largest art blogs on Tumblr. It is a visual laboratory that explores weekly themes through art and mines the internet for images, memes, quotes, links and videos. LABS is an online experiment that welcomes public submissions for its Talk Back Tuesday feature every Tuesday and its Events Thursday feature every Thursday. To submit content, visit hyperallergic.tumblr.com/submit

The Hyperallergic Podcast, known as Hyperallergic TV, features video & audio discussions of art, exhibitions, trends, the art blogosphere, and issues facing the art world. Hyperallergic TV is also available on iTunes.

The Hyperallergic Newsletter is sent out weekly and includes a letter from the editor with a recap of the most popular and important stories from the week. (Subscribe here) Newsletter subscribers also get first dibs on Hyperallergic events, that include discussions, parties, screenings and performances.




19 Students Arrested at New School Protest

April 10, 2009 · Print This Article

Wow. I thought this story might be cooling down, but instead it’s exploding! Check out this link-filled update by Hrag Vartanian on the occupation & arrests at The New School over the mass firings of adjunct fine art faculty calling for New School President Bob Kerrey’s resignation. UPDATE: (check out this website for statements issued directly by students and others involved in or sympathetic to the protests, rallies, occupation and other recent New School-related events).

Vartanian’s following the events closely via news, blogs, and Twitter updates from those on the ground. The New York Times has background on the story, plus video of the arrests and photos of the protest.

New York Times

New York Times




Friday Clip Show

April 3, 2009 · Print This Article

Are re-blogged links the blogger’s version of the sitcom flashback episode? Uh, maybe, but in any case, here’s a partial and purely subjective roundup of the past week in art, culture, etc. in Chicago and beyond, via a whole mess o’ handy links, of course….

*Artists selected for the 53rd Annual Venice Biennale have been announced; find the list here.

*New City art editor Jason Foumberg has a nice recap along with some thoughtful analysis of last week’s “The Invisible Artist: Creators from Chicago’s Southside” panel discussion at the School of the Art Institute. UPDATE 4/4: There is some very interesting, enlightening, and pretty damn sharp back-and-forth going on in the comments section of this article by panel participants and others who strongly disagree with (or have misunderstood) Foumberg’s assessment of the panel and the issues it addressed.

*The mass firings of adjunct fine art faculty at Parsons The New School for Design: blogger Hrag Vartanian’s coverage has been some of the most thorough thus far. Check out his posts here, here and here as a start.

*Time Out Chicago writer Lauren Weinberg has a piece this week on the ways in which Musuems in Chicago and elsewhere are using social media.

*Big yawn: on the Twitter front, an update on @platea’s Twitter happening I blogged about a few weeks ago. UPDATE 4/4: NewCity reported on what happened during the Twitter Island project discussed in that same blog post, here.

*A huge Pose slideshow available on The World’s Best Ever.

*Tyler Green of Modern Art Notes provides an excellent, two-part summary of a rare Robert Frank public talk this week with National Gallery of Art curator Sarah Greenough; part one and two.

*Via C-Monster: The Architecture of the Drug Trade. A fascinating look at  the landscape of weed and the architecture of the grow house. Especially loved the comparison of the latter to Max’s bedroom in Where the Wild Things Are.

*Paddy Johnson of Art Fag City writes for The L Magazine on why Jenny Holzer is not the patron saint of Twitter in her review of Holzer’s Protect Protect Project, which originated at the MCA and is now at The Whitney.

*Via ArchitectureChicago: iTunes offering free download of the first movement of John Cage’s 4’33”.

* Get your art on at Chicago Artist’s Resource (CAR)’s Creative Chicago Expo tomorrow (Saturday) from 10-4. Workshops and Consult-a-thons galore for individuals and arts organizations.

*And finally, the hermeneutics of “pin diplomacy”: via Artnet Magazine, Madeleine Albright’s pin collection to be shown at the Museum of Arts & Design in New York.  Pins weren’t mere jewelry for Albright, they added a subtle layer to her diplomatic efforts.  She wore a bee pin when talks were getting pointed, a balloon pin when she felt hopeful, and a snake pin after Sadaam Hussein’s people called her a serpent. I’m so there!