Dead Hare Radio Hour Interviews Duncan MacKenzie

March 28, 2011 · Print This Article

The Dead Hare Radio Hour is a new radio show originating from Poughkeepsie, NY. Focusing on the art/culture/thought/talk nexus, it is broadcast every Tuesday at 5pm (EDT) on 91.3 WVKR, Poughkeepsie, NY. Even better for those of us outside broadcast range, the folks behind the program are making each show available via iTunes, get it right here! Their first episode features interviews with Bad at Sports’ beloved co-leader Duncan MacKenzie, as well as with the kick-ass NY-based art journalist/blogger Carolina Miranda aka C-Monster.

I am lovin’ their whole Dead Hare rationale. Here’s an excerpt from the “About Us” page of their website:

Why ‘Dead Hare Radio’?

We settled upon Dead Hare for a number of reasons.  It is in part an homage to Joseph Beuys and his work 1965 performance “How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare.” The image of the hare (living and dead) has populated works throughout the history of art.   One aspect of Beuys’ piece is the allusion to this presence and, by default, we’re doing the same.

In regard to Beuys’ piece, the homage we’re paying  is to an aspect of that work that Beuys certainly did not intend; the futility of it all.  The futility of discussing visual culture on the radio is our project.

Another appealing quality of the name is its opacity.   For those unaware of its reference to Beuys’ work it renders a fugitive image in the mind of the beholder.  Hare or hair?  Indeed, there’s a strong relationship between the genre of radio station one listens to and the hairstyle one sports on one’s head and we are honoring that synchronicity.

Also, Dead Hare has a lovely semblance of the term “dead air” – a constant reminder to us now we’re on the radio.

The show is produced by artists Christopher Albert (also of MAYKR) and Matthew Slaats. Hooray for art on radio! And double hooray when it’s available for download!




Friday’s Link Roundup

July 3, 2009 · Print This Article

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David Hammons, U.N.I.A., 2000.

On this weekly roundup we check out Robogeisha, a surprisingly versatile robot, half a Century of Nuclear Explosions, and Brooklyn is burning. Actually this sounds like a rather apocalyptic roundup for Independence Day.

Buckminster Fuller closes This Sunday July 5th at the MCA Chicago.

Scientists tour Creationism Museum: “And there was a feeling of unhappiness, too, about the extent to which mainstream scientists and evolutionists are demonized — that if you don’t accept the Answers in Genesis vision of the history of Earth and life, you’re contributing to the ills of society and of the church.” via Boing Boing

Plural Blog has a video of Half a Century of Nuclear Explosions. 2053 atomic explosions have occurred. frightening and yet strangle hypnotic.

The Museum of Forgotten Art Supplies.

Glasstire breaks down the reasons why Jerry Saltz should have a blog.

Fan made Persepolis 2.0 documenting the post elections in Iran.

C-Monster linked to a pretty awesome aritcle on the new territory of Chelsea from a 1996 New York Magazine acticle titled,  “Chelsea! It’s the New SoHo! Maybe.

Brooklyn is Burning…”the one-night event takes gender bending to whole new heights, featuring the work of emerging artists interested in expanding the boundaries of sex, sexuality, the body and whatever is left in between.” via Cool Hunting

Art Fag City speaks with casting director, Nick Gilhool of Bavo’s new art reality show.

Robogeisha, narrated by someone that sounds eerily like Mike Benedetto . Ill take the Tengu Milk with the fried shrimp. via Sean Bonner





Friday Clip Show

April 3, 2009 · Print This Article

Are re-blogged links the blogger’s version of the sitcom flashback episode? Uh, maybe, but in any case, here’s a partial and purely subjective roundup of the past week in art, culture, etc. in Chicago and beyond, via a whole mess o’ handy links, of course….

*Artists selected for the 53rd Annual Venice Biennale have been announced; find the list here.

*New City art editor Jason Foumberg has a nice recap along with some thoughtful analysis of last week’s “The Invisible Artist: Creators from Chicago’s Southside” panel discussion at the School of the Art Institute. UPDATE 4/4: There is some very interesting, enlightening, and pretty damn sharp back-and-forth going on in the comments section of this article by panel participants and others who strongly disagree with (or have misunderstood) Foumberg’s assessment of the panel and the issues it addressed.

*The mass firings of adjunct fine art faculty at Parsons The New School for Design: blogger Hrag Vartanian’s coverage has been some of the most thorough thus far. Check out his posts here, here and here as a start.

*Time Out Chicago writer Lauren Weinberg has a piece this week on the ways in which Musuems in Chicago and elsewhere are using social media.

*Big yawn: on the Twitter front, an update on @platea’s Twitter happening I blogged about a few weeks ago. UPDATE 4/4: NewCity reported on what happened during the Twitter Island project discussed in that same blog post, here.

*A huge Pose slideshow available on The World’s Best Ever.

*Tyler Green of Modern Art Notes provides an excellent, two-part summary of a rare Robert Frank public talk this week with National Gallery of Art curator Sarah Greenough; part one and two.

*Via C-Monster: The Architecture of the Drug Trade. A fascinating look at  the landscape of weed and the architecture of the grow house. Especially loved the comparison of the latter to Max’s bedroom in Where the Wild Things Are.

*Paddy Johnson of Art Fag City writes for The L Magazine on why Jenny Holzer is not the patron saint of Twitter in her review of Holzer’s Protect Protect Project, which originated at the MCA and is now at The Whitney.

*Via ArchitectureChicago: iTunes offering free download of the first movement of John Cage’s 4’33″.

* Get your art on at Chicago Artist’s Resource (CAR)’s Creative Chicago Expo tomorrow (Saturday) from 10-4. Workshops and Consult-a-thons galore for individuals and arts organizations.

*And finally, the hermeneutics of “pin diplomacy”: via Artnet Magazine, Madeleine Albright’s pin collection to be shown at the Museum of Arts & Design in New York.  Pins weren’t mere jewelry for Albright, they added a subtle layer to her diplomatic efforts.  She wore a bee pin when talks were getting pointed, a balloon pin when she felt hopeful, and a snake pin after Sadaam Hussein’s people called her a serpent. I’m so there!




Paul H-O interviewed by C-Monster

March 22, 2009 · Print This Article

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One of my favorite blogs, C-Monster, has an interview with ‘Guest of Cindy Sherman’ director Paul H-O. “During a series of exclusive interviews, Paul and Cindy fall in love and begin a romance. Unexpectedly, the relationship forces Paul to confront issues of ego, gender and identity as he gets caught up in the aura of Cindy’s celebrity.With unprecedented access, the documentary places us in the company of the great artist. Spanning over 15 years and including more than fifty interviews with art world and entertainment luminaries…” The interview is a bit random. No mention of Sherman, mainly just some random questions but might be worth it if you like Paul H-O.

Guest of Cindy Sherman opens March 27th in selected theaters.

via C-Monster
C-M: What’s the biggest stereotype about art?
H-O: That tremendous macho attitude that someone like Picasso embodied. Martin Kippenberger established a certain style for himself that way, too. Then there’s Schnabel. People don’t think I like Julian Schnabel, but, in fact, I adore him. He’s given me great material. He is that larger-than-life figure. He adopts the attitude of being Picasso, and since he’s such a visible figure, Hollywood people see him and say, “Here’s an artist!”

Read the entire interview here.




MOCA Recap

November 24, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket Eli Broad at BCAM

Last week I reblogged that LA’s MOCA was having some serious financial problems. Here is a brief recap of last week’s events.

Following the report of MOCA’s woes Jeremy Strick sent an e -letter in response to the report. In the LA Time’s post a reader points out that MOCA’s 990 statement posted to Guidstar.com shows that Strick not only makes about half a million a year but also that the institution has loaned him about another half mill for a house. The comments are totally worth checking out.

On the 20th art critic Christopher Knight asked the two questions: “Are you freakin’ kidding me? What on Earth do you think you’re doing?”

Then it looked as if MOCA had been looking to LACMA for a bailout.

On Friday Eli Broad, who was a founding chairman for MOCA, had announced that he would be willing to help them out with a $30 million donation if other people would also help.

There have been a lot of good discussions going on Culture Monster’s (not to be confused with C-Monster) posts this past week. Many readers have been blaming the museum’s lack of publicity and what some have claimed to be too high of salaries for it’s directors. In the past 5 years or so MOCA has had some really big shows. They had the Warhol Retrospective in 2002, the Basquiat retro in 2005, Masters of American Comics in 2005, WACK in 2007, and Murakami’s huge show this past summer, all of which were packed when I saw them (I am from LA). Maybe they do not have as many visitors as the Art Institute but I’m sure their attendance rate is not hurting so bad, maybe I’m wrong. It just seems that all of this comes down to horrible financial planning and poor fundraising. If Broad does help them out, what is MOCA going to do to make sure this doesn’t happen again?