Ox-Bow? Its like adult Hogwarts for artists.

June 25, 2013 · Print This Article

Christian Kuras and I have been busily preparing for a class we should have called “The Decent into Awesome.” A class that brings together Avital Ronell, Silkscreens, and Juggalos/Celine Dion, publishing as form, and the new sincerity manifesto, so wrong it can only be right. It is going to be magic. We will make, talk, collaborate, share, and be awesome. (We will definitely figure out whether awesome is really something we want to be and no prior printmaking experience is necessary!)

Our friends at Ox-Bow just let us know that their are still a couple of slots open in our class and we thought we should remind you of the life altering good times that can be had at Ox-Bow. I am going to be polite and not mention the dance parties or Eric May’s (and co’s) amazing cooking or the blazing good times that will be had around the fire every evening. I will just mention that there are still slots available in the following classes and that it is one of the greatest experiences to give your art life.

Towards a New Sincerity with Christian “North” Kuras and Duncan MacKenzie (7/14-7/27)

Lithography with Mark Pascale  (8/11-17)

Egg Tempera with Carl Baratta (7/14-20)
Portrait as Starting Point with Andrew Winship (7/4-10)

If this was is not enough maybe you should check out these images and maybe you should come?

lagoon

ox_fall_0034

IMG_5718

ox_fall_001

IMG_0013

IMG_2076




Changes… Caroline Picard “tagged in” as Managing Editor for the text side of B@S and Meg Onli picks up a Warhol Grant! Oh my.

December 19, 2012 · Print This Article

Dear B@Sers,

We are super excited about a couple of things…

In the beginning of December, Caroline Picard began acting as the Managing Editor for the Bad at Sports blog. As you know she has been writing for B@S for about two years now and we are super excited to have her taking on this roll. The blog has made tremendous strides since Meg Onli jump started it in 2008. In the coming months — particularly in the month of January — new contributors will begin to emerge as we start to see her carve out a new monthly rhythm. She will tell you more about it as she gets rolling.

And while we are looking back to those magic days with Meg we must note that her Black Visual Archive (http://blackvisualarchive.com/) picked up a Warhol Grant. Hell Yes! Meg, we could not be more proud. More from her site here… http://blackvisualarchive.com/bva-awarded-arts-writers-grant/ (sorry it took us so long to post something.)

Your Pals,
Duncan and Richard.




Sita Sings the Blues

May 19, 2009 · Print This Article

Photobucket

This morning I found an email from Richard Holland that simply stated “utterly awesome” with a link. I clicked on the link and found myself at the home page for the film Sita Sings the Blues. I had seen the movie poster while I was at the Gene Siskle Film Center and had thought about seeing it based on the animation. But as usual I was too lazy and forgot about it. On the front page you are greeted with a letter to the audience: “I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.” The film came about when Nina Paley was dumped by her husband after he had moved to India via e-mail. The film is a recreation of the Indian story The Ramayana.

Wired has a great interview with Nina Paley:

Wired: What is your movie about?

Nina Paley: Sita Sings the Blues is a musical, animated personal interpretation of the Indian epic the Ramayana. The aspect of the story that I focus on is the relationship between Sita and Rama, who are gods incarnated as human beings, and even they can’t make their marriage work [laughs].

Wired: And that ties in with the film’s second narrative.

Paley: Right, and then there’s my story. I’m just an ordinary human, who also can’t make her marriage work. And the way that it fails is uncannily similar to the way Rama and Sita’s [relationship fails]. Inexplicable yet so familiar. And the question that I asked and the question people still ask is, “Why”? Why did Rama reject Sita? Why did my husband reject me? We don’t know why, and we didn’t know 3,000 years ago. I like that there’s really no way to answer the question, that you have to accept that this is something that happens to a lot of humans.

Wired: And this whole movie was rendered on a laptop?

Paley: I started on a G4 titanium laptop in 2002. I moved to a dual 1.8-GHz tower in 2005, moved again to a 2-by-3-GHz Intel tower December 2007, with which I did the final 1920 x 1080 rendering.

view the entire interview here.

I just downloaded it and am looking forward to watching it after the Blackhawks play the Red Wings tonight. Yeah, I like sports.