Episode 112: Trevor Paglen/ Pate Conaway

October 21, 2007 · Print This Article

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This week: Marc and Brian talk to Trevor Paglen.

“Trevor Paglen is an artist, writer, and experimental geographer working out of the Department of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. His work involves deliberately blurring the lines between social science, contemporary art, and a host of even more obscure disciplines in order to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to interpret the world around us. His most recent projects involve close examinations of state secrecy, the California prison system, and the CIA’s practice of “extraordinary rendition.”

Paglen’s visual work has been shown in galleries and museums including MASSMOCA (2006), the Warhol Museum (2007), Diverse Works (2005), in journals and magazines from Wired to The New York Review of Books, and at numerous other arts venues, universities, conferences, and public spaces. He has had one-person shows at Deadtech (2001), the LAB (2005), and Bellwether Gallery (2006).

Paglen’s first book, Torture Taxi: On the Trail of the CIA’s Rendition Flights (co-authored with AC Thompson; Melville House, 2006) was the first book to systematically describe the CIA’s “extraordinary rendition” program. His second book, I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to be Destroyed by Me (Melville House, 2007) an examination of the visual culture of “black” military programs, will be published in November 2007. He is currently completing his third book, entitled Blank Spots on a Map, which will be published by Dutton/NAL/Penguin in late 2008/early 2009.

Paglen has received grants and commissions from Rhizome.org, the LEF Foundation, and the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology. In 2005, he was a Vectors Journal Fellow at the University of Southern California.

Paglen holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is currently completing a PhD in the Department of Geography at the University of California at Berkeley.”

NEXT: Terri and Serena talk to Pate Conaway.

“Pate Conaway is an interdisciplinary artist from Chicago, Illinois. Conaway sees the act of art-making as a performance in itself. Conaway has produced art in gallery situations, including during a five-week stint at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago where he knitted a pair of nine-foot-long mittens. The artist, whose background is in performance and paper arts, continues to work in sculpture, installation, and interactive performance. Now learning to sew, Conaway is fascinated by the idea of applying garment construction techniques to bookbinding. Pate Conaway is a graduate of Chicago’s Second City Training Center and received his MFA from Columbia College, Chicago. He has exhibited extensively in the mid-west and his work can be found in the Artist Book Collection at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.”

Also Richard horribly mispronounces Mr. Conaway’s name and gives a profound apology from one Richard Wholand.

AND Mike B. has a rant to offer.
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Episode 111: Sympathy for Dominic Molon

October 14, 2007 · Print This Article

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downloadDominic smells like brimstone?
Duncan and Richard talk to Dominic Molon about, Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967. There are lots of “Rock out with your cock out!” kind of stupid comments. Paul Klein and Wesley hated it, hear from the curator go check out the show and see what you think.

From the MCA site:

“Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967 examines the dynamic relationship between rock music and contemporary visual art, a relationship that crosses continents, generations, and cultures. Since the late 1950s this unlikely hybrid of rhythm-and-blues and country music has had an undeniable impact on society while drastically changing with the times. Artists from the 1960s to the present have maintained a strong connection to rock, beginning with Andy Warhol’s involvement with The Velvet Underground (who released their Warhol-produced landmark album The Velvet Underground and Nico in 1967 — the same year the MCA opened its doors). More recently, artists such as Slater Bradley, Raymond Pettibon, and Mike Kelley have created album covers and music videos for rock bands, while many noted rock musicians such as John Lennon, Bryan Ferry, and Peter Townsend have emerged from art schools.

This exhibition is the most serious and comprehensive look at the intimate and inspired relationship between the visual arts and rock-and-roll culture to date, charting their intersection through works of art, album covers, music videos, and other materials. The exhibition addresses the importance of specific cities such as London, New York, Los Angeles, and Cologne; rock and roll’s style, celebrity, and identity politics in art; the experience, energy, and sense of devotion rock music inspires; and the dual role that many individuals play in both the sonic and visual realms. This exhibition is curated by MCA Curator Dominic Molon.”
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Episode 110: Around the Coyote?!?/ SF opening extravaganza

October 7, 2007 · Print This Article

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Is there an art scene in Wicker Park anymore? Why does Around the Coyote have such a crap reputation these days? Duncan asks the hard questions to Around the Coyote Executive Director Allison Stites and festival coordinator Jessie Cochran about what they are doing, what they are working on, and how they are trying to turn the program around, bring in quality curators and artists and make it relevant and interesting. They don’t shy away from straight answers.

This week the San Francisco Bureau introduces their new co-host, the fabulous Patricia Maloney, in a survey of the fall season exhibitions. Brian, Marc, and Patricia review a smorgasbord of shows including: Olafur Eliasson at SFMOMA, the opening of the new Ratio 3, Jessica Silverman Gallery, Ping Pong, Queens Nails Annex, Heather Marx Galley and a cavalcade of others. Meanwhile, Marc pitches in with a report of the LA Chinatown openings while Brian and Patricia debate anatomical merits of R. Crumb and Tom of Finland. Good Times!
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Episode 109: Roger Brown Study Collection

September 30, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and guest host Shannon Stratton talk to Lisa Stone curator of the Roger Brown study collection about what a kickass resource it is and what you can do, by simply clicking a mouse, to help save it.

Kathryn Born checks in from the Hyde Park Art Center about their current show.

Coming soon! Jim Elkins, Judy Ledgerwood, Dominic Molon on rock, Lee Bontecou, Tony Fitzpatrick versus Mike Benedetto and ever so much more!!!

Through a series of gifts and bequests The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) has become the primary repository of the personal, intellectual, and artistic effects of alumnus Roger Brown. His generosity to the School included a remarkable group of paintings and prints. Brown’s gift of paintings is organized into two groups: the Roger Brown Permanent Collection, a study collection of works that are available for study and exhibition, and the Roger Brown Estate Collection of Paintings and Prints. Works from the Estate Collections are offered for sale to museums and private collectors, and are available for loan to museum exhibitions. Proceeds from the sale of paintings and prints provide a major source of operating support for the Roger Brown Study Collection.

SAIC is in the unique position to share a wealth of artistic, personal, and intellectual resources from the RBSC Archive with collectors and institutions considering loans or purchases. The RBSC Archive includes Brown’s sketchbooks from early/student years to the early 1990s. From these we can often provide images from Brown’s creative process for a specific work or art, or a time frame in Brown’s career. We can often provide provenance, exhibition and publication histories, and at times we can find references to specific works or ideas in Brown’s writings.
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Episode 108: Marc Fischer

September 23, 2007 · Print This Article

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Marc Fischer love his Sabbath
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This week Anthony Elms and Duncan talk to Marc Fischer about the Public Collectors project and other things.

Then Marc LeBlanc and Brian Andrews talk about how Marc is turning Japanese, he thinks he’s turning Japanese, he really thinks so….

The intro discusses how Philip von Zweck is a thug.

Anthony, please, dear God, talk in to the mic, seriously.

The following blurbs were shamelessly stolen from PVZ’s site:

Marc Fischer is 1/3 of the group Temporary Services, 1/11th of Mess Hall- an experimental cultural center in Roger’s Park (where he co-organizes the Hardcore Histories series), and an artist who curated the prison-themed exhibition “Captive Audience” at Gallery 400 earlier this year. In addition to believing that vinyl remains the superior format for the appreciation of recorded music, Fischer still refuses to own a fucking cell phone.

Anthony Elms overcame his youth as just another punk in Michigan to become the assistant director of Gallery 400, the editor of WhiteWalls, and a writer whose works have appeared in like every freakin’ magazine ever (except Artforum, whatever), plus in some exhibition catalogs for stuff that didn’t happen at VONZWECK, but was still ok. He’s pimped himself out at times; and participated in some panel discussions, but I think the panel discussion is always a bad idea, always. Anthony agrees.

On Public Collectors:
VONZWECK- as an entity, doesn’t care about art. You know it, you always have. But VONZWECK likes administration, and… stuff. Especially other people’s stuff! So does Marc Fischer. He likes stuff so much he’s started a whole new initiative to get to see it, and, being the unselfish soul that he is, to share it.

It’s called Public Collectors and it is founded upon the concern that there are many types of cultural artifacts that public libraries, museums and other institutions and archives either do not collect or do not make freely accessible. Public Collectors asks people that have had the luxury to amass, organize, and inventory these materials, to help reverse this lack by making their collections public. It’s voluntary and it’s free. Not about selling, or buying and not restricted to art. It’s about getting to see something you might not have access to otherwise and exchanges of knowledge.

For this – the kickoff, the ribbon cutting, Marc will be sharing one of his collections: records. That’s right actual records, long players, vinyl, what have you. Many will be on display; many more will be brought to the space for listening on request.

But the idea isn’t just for you to see Marc’s stuff, it’s for you to share your collection(s) and view other peoples’. Other collections are online and many more will be added soon at www.publiccollectors.org.
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