Miami Beach news report [or] why I am not going to Art Basel this year.

October 17, 2007 · Print This Article

More to come as it unfolds…..

Episode 111: Sympathy for Dominic Molon

October 14, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and Richard talk to Dominic Molon about, Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967. There are lots of “Rock out with your cock out!” kind of stupid comments. Paul Klein and Wesley hated it, hear from the curator go check out the show and see what you think.

From the MCA site:

“Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967 examines the dynamic relationship between rock music and contemporary visual art, a relationship that crosses continents, generations, and cultures. Since the late 1950s this unlikely hybrid of rhythm-and-blues and country music has had an undeniable impact on society while drastically changing with the times. Artists from the 1960s to the present have maintained a strong connection to rock, beginning with Andy Warhol’s involvement with The Velvet Underground (who released their Warhol-produced landmark album The Velvet Underground and Nico in 1967 — the same year the MCA opened its doors). More recently, artists such as Slater Bradley, Raymond Pettibon, and Mike Kelley have created album covers and music videos for rock bands, while many noted rock musicians such as John Lennon, Bryan Ferry, and Peter Townsend have emerged from art schools.

This exhibition is the most serious and comprehensive look at the intimate and inspired relationship between the visual arts and rock-and-roll culture to date, charting their intersection through works of art, album covers, music videos, and other materials. The exhibition addresses the importance of specific cities such as London, New York, Los Angeles, and Cologne; rock and roll’s style, celebrity, and identity politics in art; the experience, energy, and sense of devotion rock music inspires; and the dual role that many individuals play in both the sonic and visual realms. This exhibition is curated by MCA Curator Dominic Molon.”
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Episode 110: Around the Coyote?!?/ SF opening extravaganza

October 7, 2007 · Print This Article

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Is there an art scene in Wicker Park anymore? Why does Around the Coyote have such a crap reputation these days? Duncan asks the hard questions to Around the Coyote Executive Director Allison Stites and festival coordinator Jessie Cochran about what they are doing, what they are working on, and how they are trying to turn the program around, bring in quality curators and artists and make it relevant and interesting. They don’t shy away from straight answers.

This week the San Francisco Bureau introduces their new co-host, the fabulous Patricia Maloney, in a survey of the fall season exhibitions. Brian, Marc, and Patricia review a smorgasbord of shows including: Olafur Eliasson at SFMOMA, the opening of the new Ratio 3, Jessica Silverman Gallery, Ping Pong, Queens Nails Annex, Heather Marx Galley and a cavalcade of others. Meanwhile, Marc pitches in with a report of the LA Chinatown openings while Brian and Patricia debate anatomical merits of R. Crumb and Tom of Finland. Good Times!
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Episode 109: Roger Brown Study Collection

September 30, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and guest host Shannon Stratton talk to Lisa Stone curator of the Roger Brown study collection about what a kickass resource it is and what you can do, by simply clicking a mouse, to help save it.

Kathryn Born checks in from the Hyde Park Art Center about their current show.

Coming soon! Jim Elkins, Judy Ledgerwood, Dominic Molon on rock, Lee Bontecou, Tony Fitzpatrick versus Mike Benedetto and ever so much more!!!

Through a series of gifts and bequests The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) has become the primary repository of the personal, intellectual, and artistic effects of alumnus Roger Brown. His generosity to the School included a remarkable group of paintings and prints. Brown’s gift of paintings is organized into two groups: the Roger Brown Permanent Collection, a study collection of works that are available for study and exhibition, and the Roger Brown Estate Collection of Paintings and Prints. Works from the Estate Collections are offered for sale to museums and private collectors, and are available for loan to museum exhibitions. Proceeds from the sale of paintings and prints provide a major source of operating support for the Roger Brown Study Collection.

SAIC is in the unique position to share a wealth of artistic, personal, and intellectual resources from the RBSC Archive with collectors and institutions considering loans or purchases. The RBSC Archive includes Brown’s sketchbooks from early/student years to the early 1990s. From these we can often provide images from Brown’s creative process for a specific work or art, or a time frame in Brown’s career. We can often provide provenance, exhibition and publication histories, and at times we can find references to specific works or ideas in Brown’s writings.
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Are gardens art? When do you own art? When can you destroy art?

September 24, 2007 · Print This Article

Chapman Kelley Garden before afterChapman Kelley calls the Chicago, IL Grant Park wildflower garden he created more than 20 years ago “my Mona Lisa.”

The 66,000-square-foot plot of 45 different kinds of species splashed yellow and purple when in full bloom was once called a “magnificent piece of art.” by then Mayor Harold Washington.

But is the garden — or was it, before the Chicago Park District halved it — art by legal definition? Can you own art, does the buyer/commisoner own it and therefor destroy it when it sees fit to? Those questions and more go before a federal judge today in regards to the lawsuit filed by Mr. Kelley.

In consideration is the federal Visual Artists Rights Act which protects the destruction or alteration of works of art of “recognized stature”. The city posits that the law awsa created to protect outdoor paintings, murals & sculpture and not to protect gardens. Mr. Kelley is stating that his garden is an environmental sculpture.

Kelley is a painter, but his garden in Daley Bicentennial Plaza, just east of Millennium Park, brought him his greatest praise. It appeared in travel guides. And at one point, the district compared Kelley to other “heroes of Chicago landscape” such as Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Jackson Park.

Is it protected art, what is the right of the artist, what is the right of the commissioner, if artists can not get longevity and recognition from public work will they continue to do it? If cities have to fear lawsuits and damages in the 6 figure or higher level when they redesign city areas will that put a freeze on public art commissions?