Episode 125: Tim Fleming/Art Reviews

January 20, 2008 · Print This Article

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Tim Fleming

100 minutes of raw power! Brian and Marc talk to Tim Fleming, Director of Art LA. If that weren’t enough for a whole show, we go that extra mile and knock your socks off!!!

Lori Waxman and Duncan check out the current batch of shows around the West Loop. Did they review your show, oh yes they did, you’d better listen.

Tim Fleming
Art LA
Artforum
Seven Three Split
Bucket Rider
Butcher Shop/Dogmatic
Pedro Velez
Jose Lerma
Scott Roberts
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
The Stray Show
Art Chicago
Tom Blackman
Melissa Schubeck
Joymore
Standard
David Roman
1/Quarterly
Daniel Hug
Heather Hubbs
Guido Baudach
Taka Ishii Gallery
Tomio Koyama Gallery
LA Art Show
FADA
Photo Miami
David Cordanski Gallery
China Art Objects
Alexis Johnson
Superflex
The Armory Show
Frieze Art Fair
Fred Snitzer
Patrick Painter
Michael Lett
Jeffrey Rosen
Bortolami Gallery
Hammer Museum
Dean Valentine
For Your Art
DAP
Mark Wallinger
Donald Young
Thomas Eakins
James Everett Stanley
Juan Angel Chavez
kavi gupta
John Isaacs
Nathan Mabry
Lorna Macintyre
Sterling Ruby
Felix Schramm
Michael Stumpf
Tony Tasset
Carrie Secrist
Ed Ruscha
Laura Owens
Bodybuilder and Sportsman
Phillip Guston
Portia Hein
Three Walls
Heather Mekkelson
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
Siebren Versteeg
Walsh Gallery
Zhang Qing
Navta Schulz Gallery
Jason Hackenwerth
Gescheidle
Nicolas Lampert

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_125-Tim_Fleming-Reviews.mp3

20 Responses to “Episode 125: Tim Fleming/Art Reviews”

  1. Long show, interesting show, nice Pixies cover.

  2. I remember the 7/3 split! Great shows! Deluxe Projects was part of the early Stray show too!!! Nice to see Tim rocking it in LA!

  3. atha clarke Says:

    What…you didn’t review the Academy Records show at Linda Warren? Is that against the secret society rules?

  4. Atha,

    Here is an idea, instead of whining how about you get off of your ass and contribute, you sad sack. Seems to me that BAS is made up of mere mortals, boo hoo they missed your or your pals show. I bet if you did a review they’d run it.

    Shame on you.

  5. Good point Balzac. It appears you are adamant about hiding your real identity, which is a shame, because I think YOU would make a great contributor. Perhaps you could distort your voice? Or do it in print mostly.

  6. I have a voice for text blogging. Like Mickey Mouse meets Tom Waits.

  7. spot on about the Fearful Objects show

  8. atha clarke Says:

    i think balzac would make a great contributor too. Reads like it at least.
    maybe he could return form the grave and litter us wiht all kinds of romantic prose? Effervescent effrontery? Loaming literature for the maddening crowds of art mavens everywhere? maybe we can stick Rimbaud in there too somewhere? I hear he’s great at one liners.

  9. Ann Onymous Says:

    Who doesn’t love Rimbaud. Sure he was involved in the slave trade. Nobody is perfect.

  10. The reviews, btw, were great! Lori is a wonderful addition to the team. Clear, crisp, not afraid to state opinions and never says “sorta” or “kinda like.” Really, please Lori and Duncan, do that more!

    “Irony is not content.” One of the greatest pithy statements I have heard in ages. I’m going to quote that often.

  11. Hey where is it Mike Benedetto! We miss to him sooo muchhh! When he comes back for more?

  12. Ann Onymous Says:

    No doubt. We like Mike.

  13. Rumor is Mike B. will be back soon. I went to his house and beat him within an inch of his life for his tardiness. The doctors say he will make a partial recovery and will be recording in no time.

  14. Richard keeps sending me these home made movies of him to review. It’s making me really uncomfortable.

  15. Ssssh. That was a secret.

  16. atha clarke Says:

    Rimbaud had slaves?
    whadya know?!?!

    what a douchebag

  17. Actually, Rimbaud’s connection to the slave trade has been disputed, although certainly he was involved in business awfully close to the slave trade if not directly involved…

    RE: RIMBAUD: A BIOGRAPHY by Graham Robb

    “On the issue of Rimbaud’s involvement in slave –trading in Africa, he announces, “The file should now be reopened. Although Rimbaud never tried to profit directly from the slave-trade, it is quite clear that no European could do business in Abyssinia without it.” He goes on for some few convoluted pages, proving at best that Rimbaud may have been, at least once in 1888 for three or four days, in the same city with a caravan run by a notorious slaver.”

  18. “In his essay on Rimbaud, Marías says that posterity has the advantage of enjoying the work of writers without having the bother of putting up with the writers themselves. Rimbaud never changed his clothes and therefore smelled disgusting, left any bed he slept in full of lice, drank constantly (preferably absinthe), and rewarded his acquaintances with nothing but impertinence and insults.” And we can ignore his likely association, at least peripherally, with the slave trade.

  19. Maybe the less we know about the actual artist behind work the better. When I worked in the 20th Century department at the AIC we had a saying “The best artist to work with is a dead one” they complained a whole lot less than the living ones.

  20. yess! loved the line about irony not content as well, and the phillip guston if he did landscapes one. Made the whole show worthwhile. However, please don’t “not address” things. If you’re not gonna address it, then don’t address it. Don’t announce that you are “not going to address it.”

    Please. It comes off annoying and insidery. Like, you know what you’re talking about, and you just hung it in front of me and told me that I am not going to know what you are talking about.

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