Endless Opportunities (Or Something)

July 26, 2012 · Print This Article

Curatorial practice is in the air this week. Word came from the awesome people over at HATCH Projects as part of the Chicago Artists Coalition that applications are up for both the curatorial and artists residencies. Elsewhere in the world of curatorial-ness, something is going down in Paris, and Frieze wants someone badass to hire.

Reminder: PROPELLERFUND-AUGUSTFIRST-HURRRRRRRRY

_______
Chicago:

Hatch Projects curatorial residency application: August 15th
Hatch Projects artists residency application: October 1st

HATCH Projects (2012-2013) is a yearlong, juried incubator for contemporary Chicago artists and curators that strives to support an ecology of curatorial and artistic practice. A pioneering initiative of CAC, HATCH Projects fosters shared experimentation, exchange and creativity to produce ground-breaking exhibitions and programs.

The Curatorial Residency is a new component of the program, designed by an Advisory Committee of local curators, artists and arts administrators who identified a need for professional development opportunities for emerging curators.

Artist Residents are divided into groups of six to work with one Curator Resident throughout the year. Selected artists will participate in two exhibitions curated by the group’s assigned Curator Resident. Each Artist Resident receives professional development through dynamic exhibitions, one-on-one studio visits, public programs, and community building to develop a sustainable creative practice.

Mentor Curators will provide experienced mentorship to selected Curator Residents throughout the year: Romi Crawford, (Ph.D.) Associate Professor, Visual Critical Studies and Liberal Arts and Graduate Director, Visual Critical Studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Lisa Dorin (Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Art Institute of Chicago); Sarah Herda (Executive Director, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts); and Lisa Yun
Lee (Director, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum). Tricia Van Eck (founder and Director, 6018 North) will act as the HATCH Projects Advisor.

High five woman curator power.
chicagoartistscoalition.org/hatchprojects/ for HATCH Projects application guidelines.

____
Elsewhere:

Young Curators program, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, EU
Deadline September 30th
(hell yes: no application fee, must be under 40)

Dedicated to the emergence of the newest forms of contemporary art as it is, the Palais de Tokyo sees participating in the renewal of the ecosystem of art as part of its remit. This is why it undertakes to seek out and support new players, and new directions.
Thus in the summer of 2013 the Palais de Tokyo is entrusting its entire program schedule to young curators. Selected on the basis of the proposals they submit, the winners will bear witness to the perpetual reinvention of the issues involved in curating an exhibition, their scouting talent, and their ability to dream up new ways of relating to art. This event is likewise intended to demonstrate the dynamism of Paris and the surrounding area as part of a joint initiative involving a great many partners and institutions.

for more info on file sizing, etc:
youngcurators@palaisdetokyo.com
http://www.palaisdetokyo.com/

Curator, Frieze Foundation
London, UK

Frieze Foundation is seeking an experienced curator to devise the programme of special commissions at Frieze London, including: Frieze Projects, Frieze Film, and the selection and production of the Emdash award. The curator will have sole responsibility to deliver a high-profile and innovative art programme at the London fair.

Application: 
To apply for this position please send a CV and covering letter to hr@frieze.com with ‘Curator, Frieze Foundation’ in the subject line.

http://www.frieze.com/vacancies/#91486

 




Endless Opportunities (Or Something)

June 9, 2012 · Print This Article

Lately there has been more grants and prizes than you can shake a stick at. Beginning with the Frieze prize, I’d say it’s the perfect time to devote yourself to writing. If you’re lazy like me though, you take pictures and should apply for the Humble grant for emerging photographers. If you’re just straight up post modern (read: into ‘net art) you should apply to the new Creative Commons prize, notably titled “The Liberated Pixel Cup.” If you’re a painter…well, I just don’t know what to tell you. More info below!

 
It’s also worth noting that there’s a new video up of the ENTIRE how-to-win-the-Propeller-Fund workshop AKA, “Funding and Creating Your Independent Projects.” Check it out here.

OR, be there in person:

Saturday, June 16, 2pm
Hyde Park Art Center
5020 South Cornell Avenue, Chicago

Wednesday, June 27, 6pm
Mess Hall
6932 North Glenwood Avenue, Chicago

Wednesday, July 18, 6pm
Gallery 400, UIC
400 South Peoria Street, Chicago

 

 

____

Frieze Prize 2012
deadline: July 20th

Aspiring writers are invited to submit an unpublished 700-word review in English of a recent contemporary art exhibition. Applicants must be over 18 years old and must not have had more than three pieces of writing on art published in a newspaper or magazine. The winner will be awarded £2,000 (a lot of American dollars) and commissioned to write a review for an upcoming issue of frieze.

http://www.frieze.com/writersprize/

Humble Foundation’s New Photography Grant
deadline: June 29th

Given twice annually (fall and spring), the grant is a $1,000 cash award that recognizes the strongest new proposal in contemporary art photography as submitted to Humble Arts Foundation.
Funded projects can be new or ongoing and with visual strength and clarity of proposal.

http://hafny.org/grant/guidelines/

THE LIBERATED PIXEL CUP
deadline: June 30th

Liberated Pixel Cup is a two-part competition: make a bunch of awesome free culture licensed artwork, and then program a bunch of free software games that use it. Liberated Pixel Cup brings together some powerful allies: Creative Commons, Mozilla, OpenGameArt, the Free Software Foundation, and you.

http://lpc.opengameart.org/

 

 
p.s.

I definitely missed the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation grant program for arts writers, but with that said, there is always next year. It’s basically amazing and I think everyone involved in the arts should enter.
http://artswriters.org/home.html




Somewhere In Time : Wool & McPhee at Corbett vs Dempsey

November 24, 2010 · Print This Article

There is nothing I enjoy more than the intersection of musical performance and visual work. At Sound on Sound, a Christopher Wool exhibit at Corbett vs. Dempsey, I watched Joe McPhee activate that intersection. As stated in the CvD press release, “the title of [Wool's] show comes from a 1968 recording of [McPhee's] that has never been issued,” a gesture that echoes in Wool’s wall-length abstractions which play with what is, is not and what was there. With those paintings as a backdrop, McPhee ‘s performance created a touchstone of literal, temporal experience–a positive reminder that history is not simply a spectral projection.

Wool’s larger abstracts pay homage to modernist painting just as they undermine that homage. The focus is on surface rather than paint. The paintings are flat and slick. The action of the paint appears to have taken place behind the surface–an implied, impossible-to-reach space. A space the viewer can never touch. These paintings ask you grasp for an idea–to strain through the mark-making, and parse their accumulated gestures. While the more obvious marks are high contrast–blocks of white paint that seem applied with a paint roller, or finer snaking black lines that seem straight from a can of spray paint–the meat of the work is behind those singular pronouncements. The meat of the work is the background wash, variant erasure-marks where singular phrases might have existed before. It is about what Wool erased–a project of deduction for any viewer bordering on a Rorschach print: while some of those deductions are accurate, any number of personal associations come into play, disguising the process. Looking at Wool’s work is like shadow boxing–what becomes a metaphor for his project of painting abstracts at all.

The contemporary abstract painter must account for The History of Painting. Wool seems to suggest, via these spectral works, that history is impossible to grasp, elusive in it’s Truth, unstable, even, as it is reliant on a present’s interpretation. History becomes more an image of one’s self than any real vision of what was. The viewer parses Wool’s process, (or the history of each specific painting) just as Wool is reflecting and parsing the history of painting. In either case the result is subjective and, even, maudlin. It will never be requited. There is no true history.

Larry Clark, by Christopher Wool

Images of Wool: The giant bare room with countless paintings lined up along the walls. The boxing bag hanging on the periphery of a studio shot. Photographs of broken-down cars. Artist in a El Paso tank top with a breathing mask and paint gun. Wool is a painter’s painter; in a frieze article his nose is discussed at length as an ideal, “A seriously tremendous nose, something a rock climber would gaze at in awe, especially if it were on the scale of Mount Rushmore. How would one begin to climb it?” All of these images, both self-created and perpetuated by others amount to a decidedly male tradition; it echoes of Pollack and yet, as one of many in a patriarchal succession: how to fill the shoes of a predecessor? How to achieve some recognition? Especially when the death of said predessor boasted a simultaneous “death of painting.” A death no one really believes in, but nevertheless enjoys to bat around. (An article I read years ago, I wish I could remember suggested that every ten years we exume the body of painting to see if, indeed it is dead, before reburying it). Wool is not asking if painting is dead or alive, instead he presents ghost-paintings: after-images created out of smoke. He admits the smoke-and-mirrors archetype, while nevertheless being married to its tradition.

Last Saturday, McPhee served as a kind of in-between orator, one who played directly with the Wool’s themes while creating a connection between Wools contemporary-image-of-the-past and the present moment. There was something grounding about McPhee’s presence–a positive gesture on this side of the paintings. McPhee is real. He is not a ghost. His relationship to history, while profound (he came on the scene in the 60s and 70s and boasts a significant reputation as one who integrated emotional content with experimental improvisation), is nevertheless active, contemporary, literal. At the same, his work with recording equipment–particularly this devise of “sound on sound”–speaks directly to Wool’s process, wherein an improvised (and emotional) recording of gesture is layered on top of other temporal gestures to create unpredictable layers.

McPhee stood between the work and the audience–a man of medium height. He wore a baseball cap and carried a soprano saxophone. The beak of his saxophone was dressed in a little furry hat–a fake animal head with two plastic yellow eyes. I liked imagining the saxophone, animated with this “hat” and McPhee in his basement, staring at the yellow eyes: no doubt they have a deep relationship. He carried the audience through a range of sounds, using the saxophone’s percussive potential with windy toots and bellows; sometimes it sounded like he was blowing through a large metal pipe.

photo by Angeline Evans

At the beginning of the performance, he called the thought of Houdini into the room, mentioning his name and encouraging the audience to close their eyes: he promised to make sounds about illusion and suggested a literal connection between himself and Wool. “We are both interested in illusions,” he said. He played the saxophone and, with my eyes closed, the notes seemed to come from various directions at once despite his standing in one place the whole time. In other instances, McPhee played two songs at once, blowing through the reed just as he hummed simultaneously; eliciting a crying underbelly-sound that followed the upper sax-melody. These discordant melodies struggled to overcome one another other; neither one strong enough to do so. Like Siamese twins sharing a heart, the melodies shared one finite breath. Then this too would break off into a new song with sometimes sharp and shrill passages of music, like a fast forward bird–McPhee activated my inner ear, so that I heard the notes occurring outside of me, while experiencing an interior wiping sensation/sound inside of your head. And suddenly I recognized a passage–he played God Bless The Child, with some trembling, discordant defiance, pleasing in it’s surprise. He took us on abstract tangents only to return in time to rescue any listener from doubt with the refrain. He then read a poem.

Joe McPhee at Corbett vs Dempsey video by Angeline Evans

I think it’s important to remember any abstract improvisation can illicit a insecurity–the viewer/audience can’t know where it is going. It’s a little like going on a hike as a kid and not knowing where you’ll end up, only that you’re supposed to follow and trust the adult ahead of you. Here again there is an image of the Elder, the person showing you the steps, the person you must trust. Whether it’s the history or experimental jazz, or the history of painting, we are walking down a familiar path, trying to contextualize ourselves to that history, to understand where the contemporary “I” fits in it and figure out what the next step is. Part of learning that history is falling in love with that history, just as one must recognize a life in the present, where that history is only a shade. Like Christopher Reeve’s character in Somewhere in Time (1980), one must, in the end, let go old ghosts.

Somewhere in Time




The Naked Roundup

November 5, 2010 · Print This Article

McGinley-Tom Golden Tunnel

Tom (Golden Tunnel)" 2010 by Ryan McGinley

Photos from Artissima, Turin’s contemporary art fair
“We make money not art” has uploaded a few of the many images they took at Artissima, Turin Italy’s contemporary art fair. If the photos shown are indicative of the rest of the show it looks to be something not to be missed. Read more here

This week in “Can’t Muster the Engergy to Not Even Care About This” is a toss up
Cant decide which is of less interest, work begins on Lady Gaga’s 8 wax figures at DC’s Madame Tussauds or Sophie Crumb (daughter of Robert Crumb) releases a book of drawings that make her father look like Albrecht Durer. Read more here & here

Someone is selling off their VIP Access to Art Basel Miami Beach
Someone has put their VIP packet up on Craigslist for a minimum of $500 which gets you access to all the major events hosted by Art Basel and the Satellite Fairs. It doesn’t get you into the Delano Hotel though unfortunately you still need an even rarer commodity to do that, an actuall young & sexy woman on your arm to get the pleasure of paying $16 for a mojito. Buy your way in here

The British Government denys export license in effort to keep a Turner Painting Sold in Auction to Getty Trust  in British Hands
The British government has announced Wednesday that the required export license for “Modern Rome – Campo Vaccino,” which Turner painted in 1839, will be held up through Feb. 2, and potentially until Aug. 1, to give potential buyers who want to keep the painting on British soil a chance to match the J. Paul Getty Trust’s bid. Read more here

Rochelle Slovin Director of Museum of the Moving Image To Step Down After Renovation
Read more here

Amedeo Modigliani Nude Painting fetched a record-setting price of nearly $70 million
A wise woman with striking red hair told me a few weeks back that the nude is coming back stronger then ever and she may just be right. Amedeo Modigliani’s Nu assis sur un divan (La Belle Romaine) [Nude Sitting on a Divan (The Beautiful Roman Woman)], a canvas from an important series of nudes, drew five telephone bidders into a heated competition at the fall sale of impressionist and modern art ultimately selling to an anonymous buyer for $68.9 Million US. Read more here & here

The New York Times covers Olivier Zahm & Purple magazine
Read more here & here NSFW

The LA Times Wrings it Hands over Art Walks
The LA Times asks do Art Walks help or hurt the local scene, they might as well ask does wine production effect gallery openings; its a zen question that keeps getting asked and its ultimately pointless. Just be glad people show up at all since the overlap between the two worlds is so small if it was a Venn diagram it would look like a pair of spectacles. Read more here

The Art Newspaper Asks Does Sex Sell at Frieze
Read more here




Friday’s Twitter Roundup | 10.16.09

October 16, 2009 · Print This Article

Photobucket

Kilian Rüthemann & Niklaus Wenger

On this week’s roundup I looked at some work by Kilian Rüthemann & Niklaus Wenger, watched a fist fight between two women on a bus, and read about Ken Isaacs’ Knowledge Box on the Wall Street Journal. I am finishing up a long day at work and getting ready for openings in the west loop. Hope to see you there.

I couldn’t agree more. @TylerGreenDC on the hetero-normalizing of David Hockney.

The WSJ on Ken Isaacs’ Knowledge Box at Sullivan Galleries.

For all of you history nerds. 

Uhh…this makes me feel uncomfortable in a way I can not describe.

That’s a mouthful | Public Water Purification Island via @pruned

There is nothing I love more than a fist fight on a bus. (via @TWBE)

http://twitpic.com/li0qe – @artfagcity The only thing that could compliment “God Bless America”, Victoria secret runway wings.

I am sort of into this installation from Kilian Rüthemann & Niklaus Wenger.

Christopher Knight discusses right wing attacks on the Obama’s new painting by Alma Thomas. 

RT @cmonstah A new arts website http://hyperallergic.com/ by @hragv debuted this mornin’…

Just what the we need, another art school movie.

Best start to a Hirst review ever. “These paintings are dreadful.” I couldn’t agree more.

Ian Baldwin on London’s recent updating to the tube map. 

@artfagcity has an interview with Frieze Executive Director Amanda Sharp. Check out that hideous font. ( photo was changed after thiw tweet)