Top 5 Weekend Picks! (1/9-1/11)

January 8, 2015 · Print This Article

1. Outliers at The Mission

MAINIMAGE_1419265589

Work by Erica Bohm, Natalia Cacchiarelli, Gustavo Díaz, Susan Giles, Adam Gondek, Larassa Kabel, Jeroen Nelemans, Michelle Prazak, and Missy Weimer.

The Mission is located at 1431 W. Chicago Ave. Reception Friday, 6-8pm.

2. Lands End at Logan Center Gallery

Lands End Theresa Ganz Web 1

Curated by Zachary Cahill and Katherine Harvath with work by Carris Adams, Raymond Boisjoly, Sarah Burwash, Gillian Dykeman, Theresa Ganz, Hans Haacke, Susan Hiller, Oliver Lutz, Claire Pentecost, Dan Peterman, Carrie Schneider, Andreas Siqueland and Eric Watts.

Logan Center Gallery is located at 915 E. 60th St. Reception Friday, 6-8pm.

3. Modi • Operandi (on recipes, intimacy, trauma & other investigations) at Chicago Artists Coalition

Modi Operandi- promo1 resized and cropped second version

Work by Delaney DeMott, Hope Esser, Rami George, Dan Paz, Megan Stroech, and Jenyu Wang.

Chicago Artists Coalition os located at 217 N. Carpenter St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

4. A Ride West at Links Hall

10442514_10205902752834838_4772801131965037354_n

A film be by Valentina Vella.

Links Hall is located at 3111 N. Western Ave. Screening Friday, 7pm.

5. A/B at Julius Caesar

max_width_venn

Work by Naama Arad and Kendall Babl.

Julius Caesar is located at 3311 W. Carroll Ave. Reception Sunday, 1-4pm.




Dan Peterman’s Running Table Returns to Millennium Park

June 29, 2009 · Print This Article

petermanrunningtable97b

Chicago artist Dan Peterman’s Running Table begins installation in Millennium Park’s Chase Promenade today, and will be ready by Thursday, July 2nd, just in time for the Park’s Independence Day picnic and musical festivities. The Table will be available for public use for the rest of the Park’s 2009 summer season.

The one hundred foot long picnic table was first installed in 1997 in Grant Park.
Made from “the equivalent of two million recycled milk bottles,” Peterman’s table emphasizes the communal aspects of park experiences and public space in general.

Laurie Palmer described Peterman’s Table in a 1997 issue of Frieze:

“On close inspection, the surface of the table is rough to the touch, chaotic and unfamiliar – the swirls and strings of re-melted plastic asserting themselves. Stepping back, you can see subtle undulations in the extruded panelling: unlike wood, once-again plastic remains supple – as thick as you make it, it will still want to sag. Like other works by Peterman made of recycled plastic and suggesting infinite progression, the table is of modular construction so that, by implication, it could keep going for as long as there is space to accommodate it. Supply of materials is not a problem, since what the table is in part designed to be used for – consumption – provides the raw material for its continual extension. Here, the modular form is interlocking, so that the table can’t be broken up into separate tables of reasonable size—if you took it apart, you’d have slivers of tables, like puzzle pieces, a design feature that ensures the integrity of the idea. (The bench components, however, built into the overall design, are discrete, to allow for swinging the legs around, and some semblance perhaps of smaller groupings within the collective whole).”

You can read the full text of the Frieze article here, and more about Peterman’s work and the Running Table here.