Top 5 Weekend Picks! (6/18-6/19)

June 17, 2010 · Print This Article

This week I do have a full Top 5 for you, and this isn’t all there is out there worth seeing this weekend. Golden Gallery is opening a new show, as well as their annex. HungryMan is hosting a solo exhibit curated by Jason Lazaus. NoCoast and Perigrineprogram are both rocking out with new shows over in Pilsen. Revolution Tattoo looks like it’s hosting some fucked-up version of the Muppet show, and the grand ole’ ‘Tute is beginning a fantastic tribute show to Louis Sullivan. And to top it off, you can go see punk-folk at CvsD. And this isn’t even the Top 5 picks yet! It’s squaring up to be a good weekend. No sitting at home drinking beer, get off your ass and go see some art!

1. Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is…A LOVE STORY at Western Exhibitions

The second iteration of a joint show featuring the works of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and Daniel Albrigo. Also opening that night at WesEx: The Power of Selection, part 2, curated by Ryan Travis Christian and featuring the work of Evan Gruzis, Denise Kupferschmidt, Keegan McHargue, and Dana Dart-McLean.

Western Exhibitions is located at 119 N. Peoria St., suite 2A. Reception is Friday from 5-8pm.

2. My Funhouse at Eastern Expansion

Oh ICP, you will never cease to inspire amazing things. My Funhouse, a series from Johanna Wawro and Andy Resekis, is a photo and video installation about the Juggalo Family.

Eastern Expansion is located at 244 W 31st St. Reception is Saturday from 7-11pm.

3. Remembering the Future at The Hills Esthetic Center

And I quote, “A conglomeration of new photographs, drawings, sculpture, moving image and sound by the founding members of ACRE, Chicago’s newest Artist Residency (that takes place in the great state of Wisconsin!).” Including the work of Caitlin Arnold, Olivia Ciummo, Scott Cowan, Kyle Cronan, Melissa Damasauskas, Rachel Ettling, Aron Gent, Henry James Glover, John Paul Glover, Emily Green, Brieanne Hauger, Katy Keefe, Jason Lazarus, Greg Stimac and Nicholas Wylie.

The Hills Esthetic Center is located at 128 N Campbell Ave, G. Reception is Friday from 8-11pm.

4. Passionate Holiness at La Llorona

And I quote, “The images depict influential, yet highly overlooked and occasionally controversial Christian figures who, had they lived in the present, might have been a source of inspiration to gays and lesbians.” Work by Robert Lentz, Lewis Williams, William Hart McNichols, and David Lee Csicsko.

La Llorona is located at 1474 W. Webster Ave. Reception is Friday from 6pm-1am.

5. New Directions in Collage “Contemporary Collage” at the NEIU Fine Arts Center Gallery

And I quote, “Contemporary collage inspired work by Juan Angel Chavez, Lydia Diemer, Stephen Eichhorn, Clark Ellithorpe, Chad Kouri, Alexis Mackenzie, Leslie Mutchler, and Neva Sills.”

NEIU Fine Arts Center Gallery is located at 5500 N St Louis Ave. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (6/4-6/6)

June 2, 2010 · Print This Article

R.I.P. Louise Bourgeois and Dennis Hopper. A depressing weekend two-fer. Well, what can ya do? My solution: go get drunk off free gallery booze and look at some weird shit. Mmmm…box wine.

1. Patrick Ryoichi Nagatani and Carolyn Bernstein at the International Museum of Surgical Science

Perhaps some archaic chromatherapy to cure what ails you. Two shows opening at IMSS: Patrick Ryoichi Nagatani’s Chromatherapy and Carolyn Bernstein’s Yew Tree Project.

The International Museum of Surgical Science is located at 1524 N. Lake Shore Dr. Reception is Friday, from 5-8pm.

2. Sense Objects at Noble & Superior Projects

Another exciting paring at the corner of Noble and Superior. This round they present Kate O’Neill’s Third Law and Rebecca Kressley’s ON THE SOUTH LOCK OVER SHINE.

Noble & Superior Projects is located at 1418 W. Superior St. Reception is Friday, from 6-10pm.

3. Post-Cursor at ThreeWalls

New work at ThreeWalls by Chicago-based artist Eric Fleischauer, including video and an artist book.

Threewalls is located at 119 N. Peoria St., #2A. Reception is Friday, from 6-9pm.

4. Our First Sixty-Nine at Monument 2 Gallery

A quick turn around from last week’s show for another collaboration. This weekend Natalie Labriola and J. Patrick Walsh create Our First Sixty-Nine. How intriguing.

Monument 2 Gallery is located at 2007 N. Point St. Reception is Saturday, from 6-10pm.

5. Exhibition 7.06052010 at MVSEVM

Another chronologically, numerically titled show from the MVSEVM kids of Humboldt Park. The dance card is packed for this one, including the work of: Chad Kouri, Rachel Niffenegger, Jes Takla, Omair Hussain, Brookhart Jonquil, Robert Andrade, Luke Willard, Scott Jarrett, Carson Fisk-Vittori and Mark Beasley.

MVSEVM is located at 1626 N California Ave, #2. Reception is Saturday, from 6-10pm.




Off-Topic | The Post Family

May 13, 2010 · Print This Article

Off-Topic invites artists, curators, writers, and cultural workers to discuss a subject not directly related to the practice of making art. We would like to welcome The Post Family as our latest participants. They will be shedding some light on their favorite childhood games.

SMEAR THE QUEER by Chad Kouri

Smear the queer is a variation of another school yard game widely known as Tag or It. Also known as Kill The Carrier or Muckle, the rules are actually the exact opposite of Tag; all of the other players chase ‘it’ also referred to as all-on-one. There are no out of bounds, no teams and no winners.This player who carries the “it’ object (most commonly a football) does there best to avoid being tackled or smeared by the other players who are attempting to take the ball away. Once the ball leaves the hands of the carrier, the “it” position is filled by whomever has the guts to pick up the ball. More often than not the name of the game is repeatedly yelled out while playing. Seeing how there are no real winners, technically the game is endless but most games only last one recess period. Kids have also been known to sabotage a friendly game of catch by tossing the ball and yelling “smear the queer” immediately making the receiver of the catch a target. There is some debate over whether or not the name is offensive because the idea is everyone wants to be the queer and the point is to be the queer longer than anyone else but we can probably assume that it was not named with good intentions.

Smear the queer is not the only offensive term that is found in the school yard. Other derogatory sayings have snuck into child vernacular after decades of use by adults without us noticing like Indian Giver (one who gives something only to take it back with obvious negative implications against Native Americans) and “Yellow”(a coward or traitor with suspect origins in the early American hatred of Oriental immigrants). Of course one day the children grow up and more than likely understand the meaning of the words and stop using them but I can’t help but think how twisted all of it is. Oh well, it was a fun game and I have not had a sudden urge to tackle any gay people so I assume I’m no worse for wear.

FOOT TAG by Sam Rosen

A school wide phenomenon at Lincoln Hall Junior High School (circa 1997). While other schools were focusing on more conventional sports such as Football or Basketball, even conventional one-hand tag, Lincoln Hall students were pioneering a new sport, a sport with the speed of tag and the strategy of hide and seek. Read more




Mark Your Calenders | Beyond Walls: Nontraditional Ways of Making a Living as an Artist

August 14, 2009 · Print This Article

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Looks like former BAS guest Chad Kouri of The Post Family will be speaking on a panel at the Cultural Center. This looks like it is worth checking out.

via the Cultural Center

“There’s a wide world of opportunity outside of galleries and many artists are making a full time living by diversifying their practices. Three Chicago artists and an on line gallerist explain how they do it. Lynn Basa (moderator) creates works that adapt in setting and scale from intimate studio paintings to site specific public art commissions in terrazzo and mosaic.

She is the author of The Artist’s Guide to Public Art: How to Find and Win Commissions. Nikko Moy is the curator of Ashes & Milk, an online gallery founded on the premise that a lot can be made from very little. Lee Tracy is an artist who explores many mediums and formats of expression to make varied points that resonate from one voice. Local insomniac Chad Kouri of The Post Family is a freelance illustrator and Art Director of Proximity Magazine.”

Thursday, August 20, 6 – 7:30 pm

Chicago Cultural Center
78 E. Washington St., 1st Floor Garland Room
Chicago, IL 60602

For more info check out the Cultural Center’s site