Long Time No Talkie

January 29, 2009 · Print This Article


After a very long holiday the Bad at Sports blog is back again. We have a couple of new things coming in the month of February including a new resident blogger on some picks for the upcoming month.

I hope everyone has had a good start to the new year.

Chicago Artist? Roundtable

January 8, 2009 · Print This Article


I just received an email about The Renaissance Society’s roundtable “Chicago Artist?”. It will take place on Sunday, January 11th, at 2:00pm. Looks like something that is worth checking out.

via the Renaissance Society:
“Location: Swift Hall, Room 310, University of Chicago (Swift Hall is directly East of the gallery)
Admission: free

As this question warrants, this roundtable will feature an all-star cast including Elizabeth Chodos, Director of Three Walls; Paul Klein, critic; Chuck Thurow, Director of The Hyde Park Art Center; Philip von Zweck, artist, and many more waiting in the wings.”

Links Roundup

January 8, 2009 · Print This Article


Things have been a little slow around here. I don’t have many pressing news to reblog so here is a roundup of the things I did not post while on vacation.

I Love Typography reflected on the abundence of posts relating to the typography in film titles. I’ve noticed a bunch of sites and even segments in NPR mentioning it. Art of the Title (screen shot above) seems to have a pretty good selection.

Reference Library shows us the inside of Donal Judd’s kitchen and Le Corbusier’s Studio

The Met’s new director, Thomas Campbell, makes a YouTube video.

MOCA names Charles E. Young new CEO, for now.


January 6, 2009 · Print This Article


PBS will be showing Gary Hustwit’s documentary Helvetica tonight. The film is a documentary that gives the viewer a history and a wide array of opinions on the font. I saw Hustwit premier the film in Chicago last year at the Gene Siskel Film Center. As a fan of typography I really enjoyed the movie and is worth checking out if you have a television.

via PBS Independent Lens
“The Helvetica font was developed by Max Miedinger with Edüard Hoffmann in 1957 for the Haas Type Foundry in Münchenstein, Switzerland and quickly became an international hit in the graphic arts world. With its clean, smooth lines, it reflected a modern look that many designers were seeking. At a time when many European countries were recovering from the ravages of war, Helvetica presented a way to express newness and modernity. Once it caught on, the typeface began to be used extensively in signage, in package labeling, in poster art, in advertising—in short, everywhere. Inclusion of the font in home computer systems, such as the Apple Macintosh in 1984, only further cemented its ubiquity.”

Please check PBS for local listings

Happy Holidays

December 22, 2008 · Print This Article


Everyone at the BAS blog would like to wish you a happy holiday. We won’t be back until the new year. Hopefully we will have some new things in store.