Personas: Visualizing Your Digital Footprint

August 25, 2009 · Print This Article

PersonasOver the years many people have created data scrapers to collect and display in an interesting way the data that matches your name or search terms on the net. Year after year they get more cleaver and better. The latest of which and 2nd that I know of to come from M.I.T is Personas. Personas takes the data that it collects about you and parses and categorizes the data it finds to create a kind of Karyotype Taxonomy (somewhere in the world Duncan’s ears are burning) of where your influence or activities lie.

So have fun check it out and share your results.

Chicago Galleries Toughing Out Recession, See Hope in Upcoming Season

August 22, 2009 · Print This Article

The Chicago Tribune’s Sunday edition includes a lengthy article by Mark Caro and Lauren Viera on on how Chicago’s art galleries are weathering the recession.  According to the Trib, many gallery owners in the River North area are reporting that business took a downturn last summer and has stayed that way so far. Yet a number have also seen enough positive economic activity of late to feel glimmers of hope about the future.

“Compared with New York, where The New York Times reported in June that more than 20 galleries had closed, Chicago’s leading art districts have remained relatively stable. River North, the most established gallery area, has seen some businesses move or otherwise constrict their operations, but the bulk are still standing. The West Loop has suffered a few closings, while empty storefronts dot Pilsen‘s developer-designed art district.”

The article notes that Chicago galleries are using various recessionary strategies to stay in business. David Leonardis offered a buy-one-get-one-free sale earlier this summer, while other galleries have also offered special discounts. Still others, like Zolla/Lieberman, are highlighting more modestly-priced works for collectors feeling gun-shy about spending a lot of money during financially anxious times. And in line with what’s happening nationally, dealers who specialize in high-end artists, like Richard Gray, have found the market to be as strong as its ever been for “really rare, really fine, highly exceptional works of art.”

The arts district in Pilsen has not fared nearly so well, with numerous ‘For Rent’ signs on storefronts. Also highly worrisome news: UIC’s non profit I space Gallery may be in trouble. Its private foundation support “dried up,” and director Mary Antonakos is quoted as saying she’s worried the space will close.

It should be noted that although the Trib’s article includes numerous interviews with Chicago dealers in various media and price-points, it’s noticeably thin on accounts from dealers outside the River North area (the piece does include a quote from Carrie Secrist, whose gallery is located in the West Loop, but none from her neighbors Tony Wight, Kavi Gupta, Monique Meloche or Rhona Hoffman–prominent Chicago dealers all).

In the end, however, a gallerist’s actions probably speak louder than his or her words. The fact that all of the above-mentioned dealers are planning strong new shows to inaugurate the new fall season suggests that everything remains on track, for now anyway. Chicago art dealers appear to be hanging in there–holding their breath, to be sure, but hanging in there. Read the Tribune’s full story here.

Twitch Flicks for the Twitter Generation

August 21, 2009 · Print This Article

Three Frames condenses feature length films into what is essentially a three-frame money shot (I’m using the polite term here)–animated .gifs consisting of only three film frames. There’s something about the twitchy, jerkily repetitive results that’s fittingly pornographic–each of these ultra compact micro-films instantaneously delivers what you came for. Although there’s a bit too much emphasis on horror flicks (too obvious, imho), I find a number of these to be surprisingly compelling. Not to get too overly analytical of what’s essentially a novelty web site, but some of these animations remind me of Paul Pfeiffer‘s early video works.

Three Frame’s movie treatments actually work best when viewed in isolation from one another. You can also better judge which animations work best on the meta level of representing the spirit of an entire film in just the three frames.

They’ve even given the Three Frames treatment to The Fabulous Stains!!! Anyone remember that one? Anyone??

*Apologies, but I cannot remember where I learned about Three Frames. There should be a via credit here, and I’ve been searching through my .rss feed for the past hour trying to find the goddamn original link, and I’ve got to get on with my evening. Again, all apologies, I usually try to be careful about this.

Friday’s Twitter Roundup

August 21, 2009 · Print This Article

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On this week’s roundup we check out the always fantastic Chip Kidd discussing comic book covers, a chimpanzee reenacts a scene from the ring, and a call for proposals for the seventh art shanty project. Have a great weekend.

Chip Kidd on comic book covers.

RT @findings The Whitney lays of 8% of its staff, plans new satellite building near the Highline. 

A Chimpanzee reenacting the Ring.

BAS favorite “Sita Sings the Blues” sourcefiles are now online.  via boingboing

RT @hragv Oh graffiti, when did you become the hobby of rich people? “Though tagging, also known as graffiti-art…”

“Have you ever thought about the ironic fact that soft bread goes hard when old and hard bread goes soft?”

Daniel Fuller On Triple Candie’s Maurizio Cattelan is Dead: Life and Work, 1960 – 2009. 

Call for proposals for the Seventh annual Art Shanty Projects.

Is it necessary to see Guernica in 3D?

RT: TylerGreenDC Addressing the future of arts journalism — if there is one:

Participate in a National Survey on Artists and Economic Recession

August 21, 2009 · Print This Article

Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC), a decade-long national initiative to improve conditions for artists (which includes efforts to connect artists to greater health insurance options and maintain spaces for art and artists in community development projects, among others) is conducting an online survey on artists and economic recession. They’re inviting artists to share their experiences under the current economic climate. It’s all completely anonymous, of course, and the survey is being overseen by by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. More on the survey, from LINC’s website:

Is the recession over for you, or still going strong? LINC wants to make sure the conditions artists are facing in the current economic climate are being heard and addressed.


LINC, in partnership with Helicon Collaborative, has developed the Artists and the Economic Recession Survey to invite artists to share their current experience. This survey will provide hard data for all of us who believe that arts and culture are important so that we can achieve the changes in policy, funding, and information dissemination necessary to improve the working lives of artists nationwide.

If you have 15 minutes or so, think about participating–you don’t even have to leave your chair (if there’s a computer in front of it, anyway). The wider the range of artists’ voices, the more meaningful the survey’s results (and the analysis that follows) will be. The survey closes on September 4th, 2009, so there’s not much time left.

(Via College Art Association News).