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October 19, 2006 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports Base Camp @ ThreeWalls

In addition to recasting creative types’ lack of ability (or interest, really) in athletics as an unassailably cool attribute, local artists and podcasters Amanda Browder, Richard Holland, and Duncan MacKenzie of Bad at Sports have galvanized the expansive Chicago art scene with their weekly interviews, reviews, ruminations, and shenanigans. In the first of an experimental series of residencies (Fri 10.20 – Fri 11.24) for “site-less” artists and projects, ThreeWalls gallery hosts the BaS team as it records live interviews with artist Kerry James Marshall, gallerist Rhona Hoffman, and MCA curator Franceso Bonami. The group also moderates salons on Chicago art and its place in the art world at large, kicking off the BaS Book Club with a discussion about Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and exhibiting a “map” of the local art scene, with all its eccentric and interconnected characters.

-AM

BAS on Time Out Chicago

October 19, 2006 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports
Podcasters set up camp at ThreeWalls.
Time Out Chicago / Issue 86: Oct 19–Oct 25, 2006

The nonprofit ThreeWalls has been offering studio space to artists from around the world as part of its residency program since 2004. For the next six weeks, the artists-in-residence will be Bad at Sports, the year-old local art podcast hosted by Richard Holland, Duncan MacKenzie and Amanda Browder.

From their temporary “base camp” in the West Loop, the BASters will host panel discussions, record interviews before a live audience—and cook us pancakes.

For their first event on Friday 20, artists Tony Fitzpatrick, Bill Conger, Phyllis Bramson, and curators Mark Pascale and Gregory Knight will speak to this question: What the heck do you mean “Chicago art”? It’s what the trio refers to as the “James Yood challenge.” This all goes back to an early program when the Northwestern University art critic was asked if there was a “Chicago art” and responded, in short, that place matters. “It’s the ultimate question,” says Kathryn Born, who joined the group recently and proudly calls herself the “publicist.” BAS is about as grassroots as it gets. Born met cofounder Holland via the art listserv The Other Group. “We’ve been arguing for years,” she says. And Browder stumbled into BAS during an art stroll. “Amanda was walking down a street in the West Loop while Richard and Duncan were recording.”

The first live recording will be with artist Kerry James Marshall on Tuesday 24 at 7pm. Gallerist Rhona Hoffman will be November 7; curator Francesco Bonami will be on November 21. The pancake breakfast on October 28 at 10:30am is circled on our calendar.—Ruth Lopez

ThreeWalls is at 119 N Peoria St between Randolph Ave and Washington Blvd. For the complete schedule of BAS events, check out www.badatsports.com or www.three-walls.org.

Episode 59: Lisa Boyle & Reviews

October 15, 2006 · Print This Article

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This week: Lisa Boyle talks about her gallery’s recent move. She schools our listeners on how emerging artists should and should not approach galleries. She tells us about the fascinating game(?) Bird Horse Muffin which totally blows Richard and Duncan’s tiny little minds.

Michael Benedetto: our new 30 second film critic reviews The Proposition.

Richard, Duncan and Amanda review shows at Kavi Gupta, Carrie Secrist (during which Richard apologizes to Missy), they talk about why they were mystified by their shabby treatment at Kraft/Lieberman gallery AND why Mark Rowland of Rowland Contemporary knows how to treat gallery patrons right, and lastly Kasia Kay Art Projects Gallery. The phrase “Shitty Drawing” is thrown around way way way WAY too much. Wow.

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Episode 59: Lisa Boyle & Reviews

October 15, 2006 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


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This week: Lisa Boyle talks about her gallery’s recent move. She schools our listeners on how emerging artists should and should not approach galleries. She tells us about the fascinating game(?) Bird Horse Muffin which totally blows Richard and Duncan’s tiny little minds.

Michael Benedetto: our new 30 second film critic reviews The Proposition.

Richard, Duncan and Amanda review shows at Kavi Gupta, Carrie Secrist (during which Richard apologizes to Missy), they talk about why they were mystified by their shabby treatment at Kraft/Lieberman gallery AND why Mark Rowland of Rowland Contemporary knows how to treat gallery patrons right, and lastly Kasia Kay Art Projects Gallery. The phrase “Shitty Drawing” is thrown around way way way WAY too much. Wow.

This just in………

October 9, 2006 · Print This Article


Spread the Word!!! All local housing/land-use activists need to be made aware of this event!!!

AREA Chicago Infrastructure Lecture
#3: Community Land Trusts and Housing Strategy

a presentation and discussion with San Francisco based Author-Organizer James Tracy
October 22, 2006 2pm-5pm
at In These Times offices
2040 N. Milwaukee Ave. Chicago, IL 60647

Concerned about land-use and affordable housing? Wondering who has the right to the city?
Join the discussion!

Over the past decade, Community Land Trusts (CLT) have grown in
popularity as an affordable housing model. The CLT has the potential
to build consensus across the political divide-combining homeownership
with progressive vision of affordability and participatory democracy.
As the CLT movement grow, organizers are faced with several key
questions: How can we work to preserve communities in an era of
rapid-fire (and seemingly permanent) gentrification?; How can CLT’s
preserve resident control against very real pressures to
bureaucratize?; and in an era of cuts to the social safety net will
CLT’s work to challenge privatization or simply become a tool of it?

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