Process Notes: Part 2 with Tatyana Tenenbaum

Process Notes: Part 2 with Tatyana Tenenbaum

Guest Post by Hannah Verrill Tatyana Tenenbaum is an interdisciplinary artist whose work examines sound and movement within a shared perceptual, historical, and dramaturgical framework. Her most recent piece, Private Country, premiered this past October at The...
How We Work: An Interview With Sara Drake

How We Work: An Interview With Sara Drake

Guest post by A.Martinez I was introduced to the work of Sara Drake at my first Brain Frame event, March 2012. Brain Frame is an event series that invites comic artists to explore the performative side of their work. That night, Sara’s shadow puppet performance...
DON BAUM IT: Money And Relevance In Art In Chicago

DON BAUM IT: Money And Relevance In Art In Chicago

Guest Post by Britton Bertran The art economy in Chicago – specific to the visual art market – is busted.  It doesn’t work and hasn’t worked for a long time.  Yes, this a provincial observation as we are in a global society, but ask any commercial gallery...

“I’d be safe and warm if I was in LA…”

Towards the end of The Function of Criticism, Terry Eagleton suggests that the “role of the contemporary critic,” which is of course a different thing than the function of criticism – right? a role and a function are different things, but of course the function of something might be to provide a role, or a role might be to serve a function, in both cases it seems like function is greater than, trumps or possibly dictates, role – is to reconnect “the symbolic to the political,” by which he means “engaging through both discourse and practice with the process by which repressed needs, interests, and desires may assume the cultural forms which could weld them into a collective political force.” He is emphatic in pointing out that this role, this idea, is not new at all, but – like many ideas around a liberatory role for art, theory, etc – harks back to an earlier historical moment.