Episode 276: Hubert Neumann

December 13, 2010 · Print This Article

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This week: Tom, Amanda, and Duncan talk to super collector Hubert Neumann. He’s candid, he doesn’t mince words and he knows a ton of stuff, don’t miss it.

Also, Richard thinks that the Smithsonian and National Portrait Gallery are striving to redefine “spineless cowards” in their role in the museum word. Great job guys, I look forward to seeing what a Fox News curated museum looks like!

Please be sure to take a moment and e-mail the following people your thoughts on their caving in to political censorship.

Bethany Bentley
Public Affairs Specialist
bentleyb@si.edu

Julia Zirinsky
Public Affairs Assistant
zirinskyj@si.edu

Sherri Weil
Director of Development
and External Affairs
weils@si.edu

Charlotte Gaither
Deputy Director of Development
gaitherc@si.edu

Kristy Snaman
External Affairs Specialist
snamank@si.edu




SAIC Curators Explore the Meaning of Having and Being Had

December 9, 2010 · Print This Article

Tomorrow students at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago will unveil four new exhibitions in the Sullivan Galleries, including Having and Being Had, a show that explores “the ritual of curatorial practice and meaning-making in museums.” The latter exhibition also includes a website featuring Q&As on curatorial practice with Chicago curators, cultural practitioners, and me, whose ‘practice,’ such as it is, falls into neither category. All four shows look really interesting – an opening reception for them all will take place tomorrow evening, Friday, December 11, from 4:30-7:00 p.m. in the Sullivan Galleries, 33 S. State St., 7th floor. Read on below for details on Having and Being Had, along with descriptions of the three other shows on view.  All shows run through January 22nd (note that the galleries will be closed for the holidays from December 24 – January 2nd).

Having and Being Had

Having and Being Had stages a performance on the ritual of curatorial practice and meaning-making in museums. As the title suggests, curators and audiences are as much authors of a legitimizing narrative as they are framed by it. The curators of this exhibition complicate our expectations of museum display by inviting the dynamic participation and active imaginings of the viewer. Having and Being Had invites audiences to reconsider the ways in which language, collections, object value, and display technique seduce audiences with illusions of access and objectivity. Art exhibitions educate and entertain, but do they also mislead and deceive the viewer? Having and Being Had exposes curatorial hierarchy, dismantles curatorial voice, and manipulates display space to engage audiences in the power of their own experiences. On display are the ethics of curatorial practice and the viewers’ imagination.

All the best,

This exhibition features new work by the artists and writers in Text Off the Page 2010, including collaborative projects, performances, installations, and language-based projects.
Featured artists: Shanita Bigelow, Troy Briggs, Annette Elliot, Sarah Jones, Nazafarin Lotfi, J.M. Lowe, Joel Parsons, David Scheier, Corkey Sinks, Jillian Soto, Hurmat Ul Ain, and Colin Winnette.
An evening of Readings/Performances in response to works in the exhibition will be held on Saturday, December 11 at 6:00 p.m. in the Sullivan Galleries.

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The eight artists participating in the Video Installation course attempt to investigate, analyze, and confront various aspects of this practice by focusing on issues of separation and contact. Their work tackles formal questions emerging from constructing multichannel installation, as well as from the intersection of a single-channel, time-based medium with a given space and performed actions.

Featured artists: Emilie Crowe, Lindsay Denniberg, Marco Godoy, Mikey McPariane, Brianne Milder, MZL, Wang Ye-Feng, and Courtney Bird Ziegler.

Stories of Relativity

How do we relate to one another? The nine artists in this exhibition explore the complex nature of human connectivity, considering how time, identity, and interpersonal tensions shape our relationships and affect our interactions.

Featuring recent work by: Hope Esser, Jang soon Im, Je Je Je Jiyeon Lim, Zihan Loo, Cheryl Pope, Casilda Sanchez, Chryssa Tsampazi, Andrew Norman Wilson, and Wei-Hsuan Vicky Yen.

Curated by Amelia Love (MA 2013), Curatorial Assistant, Department of Exhibitions




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (12/10-12/12)

December 8, 2010 · Print This Article

Select Media Festival 9: Infoporn II Exhibition & BYOB (Bring your own Beamer) at Co-Prosperity Sphere

Select Media Festival 9: Infoporn II Exhibition includes work by work by Tom Burtonwood, Dayton Castleman, Caleb Charland, Jeremiah Chiu, The Center for Urban Pedagogy, Column Five Media, Theodore Darst, Louis Doulas, David A. Garcia, Firebelly Design, Francesco Franchi, Cody Hudson, Gary Kachadourian, Derek Lerner, The New City Reader Classifieds project by Kazys Varnelis and Joseph Grima & others, MaTeVoS, Serifcan Ozcan, The Present Group, The PMIRL library Infoporn Collection, Adam Lonczynski, Adam Lonczynski and Joshua Clarfelt.

Opening is Friday night from 8pm – 1am. $6

BYOB (Bring your own Beamer): “We take down the Infoporn II exhibition and leave the gallery walls blank for use in Chicago’s first Bring Your Own Beamer (BYOB) event. BYOB is a series of exhibitions hosting artists and their projectors. Started by Berlin-based Rafaël Rozendaal, we are excited to host the Chicago version during SMF9. Please show up with a projection source and a projector.”

BYOB is Sunday night from 6pm – 10pm. FREE

Co-Prosperity Sphere is located at 3219 S Morgan St.

2. While What Waits at ROOMS Productions

The second performance of While What Waits featuring performers Holly Bittinger, Erin Briddick, Veronica Bruce, Jim Dee, Chad Duda, Aaron Gang, Danielle Lavoy, Gino Marconi, Vince McClelland, Katy Nielsen, Rebecca Pyles, Christopher Smith, Jackie Sestak, James Strzelinski, and Adam Todd.

ROOMS Productions is located at 1835 S. Halsted St. Performance is Friday from 7-10pm.

3. A Loss Like the Rome of Waiting at Linda Warren Gallery

Work by Matthew Woodward. Jennifer Presant: Surface Tension in the project room.

Linda Warren Gallery is located at 1052 W. Fulton Mkt. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

4. Wet Affairs at Swimming Pool Project Space -

Work by Jesse Butcher.

Swimming Pool Project Space is located at 2858 W. Montrose Ave. Reception is Saturday from 6-9pm.

5. Melodie Provenzano and Rachel Hovnanian at Carrie Secrist Gallery

Two still life painters showing minimally colored works.

Carrie Secrist Gallery is located at 835 W. Washington. Reception is Saturday from 4-7pm.




Art:21 Blog’s In-Depth Exploration of William Kentridge

December 8, 2010 · Print This Article

I’ve mentioned art:21′s current film William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible a few times already, but I wanted to bring art:21′s project to your attention once again in order to point out the website that accompanies the film, which offers a range of educational resources that help flesh out the film’s explorations.  I’ve contributed an essay to the site, too – I tried my hand at writing about opera – Kentridge’s production of The Magic Flute, to be exact. It was really hard to write! But satisfying. There are a bunch of really fantastic pieces on the site that address Kentridge’s prints, his tapestry projections, his production of Shostakovich’s opera The Nose, and the proverbial much, much, more, including an essay providing background on the making of the film Anything Is Possible itself. You can also watch the full, feature-length film in its entirety on the website.

As always, don’t forget to check out Bad at Sports’ ongoing column Centerfield: Art in the Middle with Bad at Sports on art:21 blog. We post on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month.

William Kentridge. The Magic Flute, 2005. Performance at Le Théatre Royal de la Monnaie, Brussels. Opera with back and front projection. Photo by and © Johan Jacobs.




Remembering Margaret Taylor Burroughs, co-Founder of the DuSable Museum

December 7, 2010 · Print This Article

The Chicago Weekly has a lengthy and moving obituary of artist Margaret Taylor Burroughs, who died on November 21st at her Bronzeville home. Burroughs was co-founder of the DuSable Museum of African American History and also helped found the South Side Community Arts Center.

The DuSable Museum will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Margaret Burroughs this Saturday, December 11, 2010 from 10:00am until 5:00pm. The day’s events will include filmed interviews about Margaret Burroughs, a symposium on her life, children’s workshops, musical and spoken word performances, and exhibition tours.Admission to the event is free; please R.S.V.P. at (773) 947-0600 ext. 627.

A brief excerpt from the Chicago Weekly piece on Dr. Burroughs follows:

In 1940, at age 23, Burroughs became the youngest founder of the South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC). During the Depression, with money from the Work Projects Administration, a coalition of Bronzeville community members sought to turn a former railroad men’s club into a public art center. The 3831 South Michigan address was across the street from the coach house she and Goss were renting, and the couple quickly became leaders in the effort. Burroughs, her husband, and other artists including Fred Jones, Charles White, and Archibald Motley Jr. worked with local businessmen to raise the money necessary to purchase the property and organize the renovation.

In 1941, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt inaugurated the center at a ceremony broadcast on national radio. Burroughs addressed the crowd. “Now, in this critical wartime period, we have our own plan for defense; a plan in the defense of culture. The opportunities which we have now, in the coming of the art center, we did not have before. This quickens our determination to see it that this art center, the first of it’s kind on the South Side, and one of the few in the country shall stand and flourish.”

The SSCAC made Bronzeville a mecca for black artists in Chicago. Even after federal money ceased in the early ’40s, the center sustained itself, sometimes barely, through the support of patrons. Burroughs said of the energy that went into the center, “We believed that the purpose of art was to record the times. As young black artists, we looked around and recorded in our various media what we saw. It was not from our imagination that we painted slums and ghettos, or sad, hollow-eyed black men, women and children. They were the people around us. We were part of them. They were us.” Today the SSCAC is in its 70th year, and is the only remaining arts facility from the WPA days.

Burroughs attended the Art Institute of Chicago, where she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1946 and a Masters in art education in 1948. In her studies she came across the Taller de Gráfica Popular. The Mexican muralists’ use of social commentary inspired her work. In 1953, Burroughs travelled to Mexico City to study printmaking and art under Leopoldo Méndez, a prominent printmaker of the Diego Rivera circle.  The influence of Mexican muralists helped her to develop the distinctive style she used in her iconic white-on-black prints of African and American history. The social aims of the Mexican muralists also had an impact on her philosophy of art; throughout her life, Burroughs made art about a world she shared with others. (Read more at The Chicago Weekly).