Art Loop Open: Vote Early, Vote Often; The Chicago Way

October 22, 2010 · Print This Article

The Chicago Loop Alliance has announced their short list of 10 artists to win the $50,000 in cash prizes for the inagural Art Loop Open.

All of the Artists on the short list have done amazing work and many that were not included deserved to make the final but this isn’t really about awards its about engaging the public. To that end Bad at Sports has officially come off the bench to support one canidate to win and that would be Steve Hamann’s History of ‘Bad at Sports’ (Work on Paper).

I know reading that you might think we are biased but that could not be further from the truth; I hate Steve Hamann. He is an annoying artist that has been the bane of my existance for longer then I would like to admit so when I ask you to vote 6 or 7 or even 10 times for his work at theWit Hotel (hell get a room and just vote everytime you cross the lobby) you will know that I do so on the merits of the work and no other reason. How great must that work be for me to ask the thousands of readers of Bad at Sports to reward a man that reads dead baby jokes in nursery wards. I may not love the artist but I salute the art.

Now having established that we will all vote for Steve “The Ego from this point out” Hamann to win lets spend some time on the great artists that should get second and third. They are hard working artists the lot of them and deserve more attention then even this is giving them, starting with a old friend Bernard Williams.

Steve Hamann - History of Bad at Sports

Bernard Williams: Buffalo Chart (Installation)
Block 37

Catherine Jacobi: Forgetting (Sculpture)
Block 37

Daniel Lavitt: Till We Meet Again (Sculpture)
Chicago French Market – MetraMarket

Giovanni Arce: Bush (Painting)
Block 37

John Dempsey: “The Great American Landscape” (Painting)
Macy’s

Joseph Ivacic: Staying Connected (Sculpture)
Hotel Burnham

Lauren Brescia: Surprise… (Installation)
Block 37

Len Upin: Helen (Work on Paper)
theWit Hotel

Yva Neal: WAKA: Wall Altat of Kismet Abundance (Installation)
W Chicago – City Center




Two Danes, A Nude & A Hotdog Place

October 22, 2010 · Print This Article

danes-nude-hotdog

Guggenheim gets turned down on its plan to create the Hot Dog Stand Frank Lloyd Wright would have built
The Guggenheim Museum considered the hot dog vendors outside its NYC landmark designed by Wright to not be in keeping with the look and style of the venue and in that vein pitched an idea to the city to build their own. Reports say that they thought the benefits would be increased revenue and a elimination of the generic style brightly colored stands. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission turned down the plan unanimously though saying “It detracts from the landmark and causes it to compete with the main building,” Robert B. Tierney, chairman of the commission, said of the proposed kiosk. “All of our standard appropriateness tests are not met here.” Too bad since I would have loved to see what they would have done, someone needs to publish the spec drawings for that plan. Read more here

TED Prize this year goes to Street Photo-Grafitti Artist “JR the Photograffeur”
Part of me is just glad that the joke awarding of food pundit Jamie Oliver is past and Jr is actually interesting albeit I wish I knew more about his work prior to now. NPR’s blog “The Picture Show” does a good job of covering a broad array of his work so I won’t say more then check it out. Read more here

Stereotypical Art Show Award Goes To Sue Williams: ‘Al-Qaeda Is the CIA’
I read about her show in the New York Times (a article with not a single image?) and was both annoyed by the lack of photos but more so curious as to what this show looked like. After looking up the official 303 Gallery website I enjoyably went through every photo. Sadly not for ascetic reasons or conceptual ones but the show is a virtual cornucopia of the current trends, tropes & stereotypes of the gallery scene today all in one places. There is the mish-mash theme, publicly antagonizing titles,  the glory in “shitty drawing”, the mix of rich color highly elaborate wallpaper with monochromatic underplayed items, the go to masturbation references, war of the sexes & ironic elevation of the sensational and banal. I would have been able to win my Art World bingo game for the month but was just missing either deer illustration, skull illustration, taxidermy animal or human silhouette. Maybe next time. Read more here & See more here

NUDE in Chicago
Part of the Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA) exposition this year in Chicago (Nov 5th-7th) will be a exhibition of sculpture being built at booth 920 with help from the audience.  Chicago artist Dana Major Kanovitz will be building the sculpture out of paper that the audience will hand to her. This is part of the larger series on show at the Perimeter Gallery which is showing a group show of artist who are looking to take a new stab at the oldest of genres in art, The Nude. You can read the press release and see images here

Danes get upset over Lego Sex
Employees at the town hall of Roskilde near Copenhagen have taken offence at the work on show in the building, paintings of two men made of Lego figures having sex. According to Danish press reports, artist Svend Ahnstrøm’s piece, which shows ‘Kurt and Anders’ pleasuring themselves in a public park, has prompted three internal complaints. But no objections have been raised about Lego depictions of Adolf Hitler and Osama bin Laden. “It’s hard to believe that something like this can offend people in today’s Denmark,” said Ahnstrøm. Deep down I wonder if his real thought was “Three people? a lousy three people?
Seriously people are too lazy to protest….” cause look at the work and sing “One of these things is not like the others, One of these things just doesn’t belong” the artist even agrees since he places Kurt and Anders at the bottom of his page last on his site. See more here

Mall in Manchester, England creates replica of Pharaoh Tutankhamun’s Tomb & Treasure
Read more here

Dutch Venice Biennale 2010 – Dutch pavilion
The Dutch pavilion is very interesting this time round and “we make money not art” does a good job of covering it. Read more here




William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible Premieres This Week on PBS Stations

October 21, 2010 · Print This Article

Art21′s feature film documentary William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible premieres on PBS this week. The national broadcast premiere is scheduled for October 21 at 10:00 p.m., though broadcast times will vary by region -  check your local listings to find out when the program will air. Also make sure to dig into all the extra content Art21 has organized in conjunction with the film: slide shows, video clips, and special essays commissioned from Art21′s regular writers. You can keep up with this material by subscribing to Art21′s special William Kentridge website’s RSS feed, by signing up for Art21′s email newsletter or hookin’ up with them on Facebook and Twitter.

William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible gives viewers an intimate look into the mind and creative process of William Kentridge, the South African artist whose acclaimed charcoal drawings, animations, video installations, shadow plays, mechanical puppets, tapestries, sculptures, live performance pieces, and operas have made him one of the most dynamic and exciting contemporary artists working today. With its rich historical references and undertones of political and social commentary, Kentridge’s work has earned him inclusion in Time magazine’s 2009 list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

This documentary features exclusive interviews with Kentridge as he works in his studio and discusses his artistic philosophy and techniques. In the film, Kentridge talks about how his personal history as a white South African of Jewish heritage has informed recurring themes in his work—including violent oppression, class struggle, and social and political hierarchies. Additionally, Kentridge discusses his experiments with “machines that tell you what it is to look” and how the very mechanism of vision is a metaphor for “the agency we have, whether we like it or not, to make sense of the world.” We see Kentridge in his studio as he creates animations, music, video, and projection pieces for his various projects, including Breathe (2008); I am not me, the horse is not mine (2008); and the opera The Nose (2010), which premiered earlier this year at New York’s Metropolitan Opera to rave reviews.

With its playful bending of reality and observations on hierarchical systems, the world of The Nose provides an ideal vehicle for Kentridge. The absurdism, he explains in the documentary’s closing, “…is in fact an accurate and a productive way of understanding the world. Why should we be interested in a clearly impossible story? Because, as Gogol says, in fact the impossible is what happens all the time.”




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (10/22 & 10/23)

October 20, 2010 · Print This Article

As I sit here, snuggled up in my polar fleece blanket against the growing chill, I am reminded that the end of comfortable gallery cruising season is almost here. For those intrepid crawlers like Jeriah and myself, this doesn’t mean the end of going out, no no, to us it just means thicker socks and heavier coats. But for many, the onset of cold fall and impending winter slows their gallery crawl motivation. SO my dear friends out there in TV land, get your ass out there before it starts to snow, ‘cus there is still lots of good shit going on!

1. The Level Eater at Co-Prosperity Sphere

A bad ass mix of gaming inspired art and real-time playing. Come to see the work, come to play. Work by Jeriah Hildwine, Luke Willard, Michael Garcia, Nick Bahr, and Sam Sieger.

Co-Prosperity Sphere is locate at 3219 S. Morgan St. Reception begins at 8pm on Friday, gaming begins at midnight.

2. The Uhaul Show at, well, multiple places

A roaming show featuring the work of Kirk Faber, Max Garret, Susie Kimball, Joe Mault, Tim Schade, Qing Yang and Chris Bradley.The people in the above picture are the artists. No, they’re not.

Friday, October 22, The Uhaul show will be parked on Columbus Drive between Monroe and Jackson just East of the Chicago Loop (6-10pm). Saturday, October 23 it will be parked just north of Division at the intersection of Damen and Chrystal (2-6pm). Sunday, October 24 it will be parked outside of our new location (3710 N. Marshfield) just a block northwest of Ashland and Addison (2-6pm).

3. Transformation Opera at Antena

Super crazy video weirdness created by artist Amelia Winger-Bearskin.

Antena is located at 1765 S. Laflin St. Reception is Friday, from 6-10pm.

4. David Maisel and Kim Keever at Carrie Secrist Gallery

Erie landscape imagery by David Maisel and Kim Keever.

Carrie Secrist Gallery is located at 835 W. Washington Blvd. Reception is Saturday from 4-7pm.

5. everything after at Kavi Gupta Gallery

Conflict zones brought to you with a twist by Curtis Mann.

Kavi Gupta Gallery is located at 835 W Washington Blvd. Reception is Saturday from 5-8pm.




Raychael Stine at McAninch Arts Center Lobby Gallery

October 19, 2010 · Print This Article

I’ve written a piece on painter Raychael Stine in this week’s issue of New City.  I’ve been interested in Stine’s work ever since she was included in Columbia College’s Object of Nostalgia exhibition last year. She has a nice selection of paintings up in the lobby gallery at the McAninch Arts Center, College of DuPage through December. Here’s the intro to the piece; just click on over to New City to read the full profile:

“There’s a lot of excess baggage that comes with being a young female painter who makes paintings of her dogs. Just ask Raychael Stine. A 2010 graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago’s MFA program, Stine is sometimes asked if she does commissions—“I have a Chihuahua too! Can you paint him?” When she was an undergrad at UT Dallas, Stine was referred to as “The girl who paints her dogs.” Even more vexing is the persistent assumption that Stine’s representational approach to painting is something she has yet to “outgrow,” as if it were not, in fact, a tactic she has consciously chosen for its ability to encapsulate emotionally inchoate and often covertly personal subjects within forms that have themselves been cast off as degraded, subservient, less-than.”

Raychael Stine. "Food For the Moon," 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas

Can I also just add that the exhibitions Barbara Wiesen has been organizing at the McAninch Arts Center have been rocking my world as of late? What I especially admire and appreciate about Ms. Wiesen’s programming of the Gahlberg Gallery space is the consistent attention she is paying to Chicago’s mid-career artists. The College of DuPage, which is located in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, can be a bit of a hike to get to – but the exhibitions here are never less than totally worth the effort, and as a perk parking is free and easy-peasy.