Episode 116: Scott McCloud!

November 18, 2007 · Print This Article

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Critic and Curator Jeff Ward joins Duncan and Richard in interviewing Comic theorist, artist, educator and all around kickass guy Scott McCloud.

From Scott McCloud’s website (www.scottmccloud.com)

“At the age of 15, I remember telling my friend Kurt Busiek “I’ve decided to become a professional comic book artist.” It was the Summer between 10th and 11th Grades. My previous decision to become World Chess Champion had proved impractical, but this time I knew I could pull it off and a year and a half out of college, I finally did.

Today, I’m probably best known for:

Understanding Comics. A 215-page comic book about comics that explains the inner workings of the medium and examines many aspects of visual communication along the way. Understanding Comics has done well in stores, is in over 15 languages and, while not universally liked, is about as close to it as I’m ever likely to see. A favorite of interface, game and Web designers despite the fact that it doesn’t mention computers once. (Published 1993).

Reinventing Comics. The controversial 242-page follow-up to U.C. advocates 12 different revolutions in the way comics are created, distributed and perceived with special emphasis on the potential of Online Comics. Nearly every page seemed to step on somebody’s toes, and the debates in the comics industry over comics on the Web have gotten increasingly heated since its publication. Reinventing Comics is the only book I’ve ever written that’s been actually described as “dangerous.” (Published 2000).

My Online Comics. They’re all here (or at least linked to from here). Take a look.

Public Speaking and Teaching. Click to find out more.

Zot!. My first series ran for 36 issues at California’s Eclipse Comics. Though ostensibly a superhero story, Zot! had an alternative flavor and featured some unorthodox storytelling and compositions. “A cross between Peter Pan, Buck Rogers and Marshall McLuhan” is how I usually describe it. (1984-1991)

My Inventions. Over the years, I’ve created a number of strange, comics-related, um… things. Enough that I decided to give them their own section of this site. Check it out.

My Other Comics.Though not numerous, I have done other printed comics including 1985′s Destroy!!, a 12 issue stint writing Superman Adventures, in the mid-90′s, a bizarre and generally disliked graphic novel about Abraham Lincoln, some mini-comics, short pieces, and various comics-style articles in magazines like Wired, Nickelodeon, Computer Gaming World, Wizard and Publishers’ Weekly.

Depending on who you ask, I’m either comics’ leading theorist or a deranged lunatic, but life continues to be very interesting for me and the ideas that I’ve raised continue to provoke reactions throughout the comics community and — increasingly — beyond it. Pick up Understanding Comics (or look for it at your local library) to begin finding out why.”

ALSO: Mark Staff Brandl checks in to review art with his students from the Central European Bureau!

Lastly Duncan and Joanna act wacky and Joanna has some interesting ideas.
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Episode 91: Gregg Bordowitz and David Getsy on “queer”

May 27, 2007 · Print This Article

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This week Terri talks to Gregg Bordowitz and David Getsy about queer art, queer theory and what it means to be queer in 2007. Duncan and Meg were there too, but it is mostly Terri, Gregg and David’s show.

Gregg Bordowitz is a writer, AIDS activist, and film-and videomaker. His work, including Fast Trip, Long Drop (1993) and Habit (2001), documents his personal experiences of testing positive and living with HIV within the context of a personal and global crisis. His writings are collected in The AIDS Crisis is Ridiculous and Other Writings:1986-2003. He is currently on faculty in the Film Video and New Media department at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

David Getsy is an author, theorist and Assistant Professor of 19th and early 20th Century Art Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago
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Episode 82: David Robbins

March 25, 2007 · Print This Article

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This week Duncan and Richard talk to David Robbins.

David Robbins has had 30 solo exhibitions of his work internationally and has recently been included in exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. He has published four books, including a novella, The Ice Cream Social (1998), and his essays and satires have been published in Artforum, Parkett, Art Issues, and numerous other magazines and catalogs. He received his degree in American Studies from Brown University. He currently lives in Milwaukee.

His forthcoming book on concrete comedy sounds like one of the most interesting things ever and I personally have pre-ordered 400 copies on Amazon.

David Robbin’s most recent book “The Velvet Grind: Selected Essays,
Interviews, Satires (1983-2005)” comprises the last 22 years of his
imaginative and challenging departures from the conventional Art
wisdom.

Book Description (Borrowed from Amazon.com)
Asked to contribute to Artforum’s “Top Ten” column, David Robbins used
one of his entries for “Electricity: That we don’t annually celebrate
Electricity Day is unfathomable.” That sense of whimsy, even amid an
advanced critical sensibility, makes this collection of essays from
the past quarter century a great read. A regular contributor to
magazines such as Real Life (in the 1980s), Purple Prose (in the
1990s), and Artforum, Robbins is one of the first artists and critics
to investigate the art world’s entrance into the culture industry. His
work reflects on the spectacle, the transformation of the position of
the artist in the visual system, and the future role of the spectator
in art. This publication also brings together his key interviews with
Richard Prince, Allan McCollum, and Clegg & Gutman; his writings on
television, Hollywood, and Warhol; and contributions to his “Institute
for Advanced Comedic Behavior.”

It can be purchased here…
Amazon.com Website
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_82_Robbins.mp3




Episode 71: van Straaten/ Hoke

January 7, 2007 · Print This Article

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Holy guacamole fun times! This week Kathryn Born interviews Natalie van Straaten. Mark Staff Brandl talks about Jeff Hoke’s kickass book-website-museum Museum of Lost Wonder. Mike Benedetto gives a DOUBLE FEATURE REVIEW. Lastly there is a special bonus treat at the end of this week’s show, it is a surprise.

Natalie van Straaten has been a professional writer on arts subjects for more than 30 years and founded Chicago Gallery News in 1983. A curator, educator, administrator and organizer, she serves on various arts advisory boards and is a frequent juror in art competitions. She served as Executive Director of the Chicago Coalition for Arts in Education (1983-1986), and co-directed an art gallery for fourteen years.

Shamelessly and apologetically lifted from Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Every now and then, a book comes along that’s almost impossible to categorize, like Hoke’s beautifully illustrated gem, a strange marriage of alchemical lore and psychology, science and “wonder.” Hoke, an artist and a senior exhibition designer at California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium, writes that the eclectic museums and curiosity cabinets of the 1600s inspired him, and that he wants to return us to a time before “science became a belief system unto itself,” a time when artist-alchemist-scientists were able to search for inner truth via mystical experiences and experiments without being ridiculed. Guided by the Greek muses and lured by his lovely color illustrations, readers are beckoned into seven “exhibition halls,” named for the stages of alchemical transformation from base matter to divinely inspired knowledge. Each exhibit also includes a pull-out interactive paper model, such as a “Do-It-Yourself Model of the Universe” in chapter one, where Hoke playfully addresses various creation myths. The chapter on dream states, visions and hypnosis is particularly fascinating. This is a book to linger over; it gradually reveals itself as a sly philosophical meditation on human consciousness, bringing in concepts from Tibetan Buddhism and quantum physics.

Coming soon! Rodney Graham!!!
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