EDITION #36 – Minnesota Nice

August 25, 2014 · Print This Article

Minnesotan Artists Decent at Sports

If anyone understands the preciousness of summertime, it’s our fellow neighbors in the Midwest. All across Minneapolis WTT? discovered artists and creatives playing Minnesota “Nice.”

Tuesday Night Music Club at the Lyndale VFW.

Our week in Minneapolis started correct when on Tuesday friend and former ACRE resident, Cris Cloud, invited us to the Tuesday Night Music Club, a post-kickball dance party at the VFW by Lyndale and Lake Street (FYI- also the name of a ’93 Sheryl Crow album). Not just any TNDC, this evening was the after party for the annual kickball game between the Kennwood Kickball Club and the team from Uptown who were decked out in full clown regalia.

Fraternizing with the locals outside TNMC.

Not a party for the faint of clowns.

In addition to the annual kickball game TNMC’s MC Jacobs was celebrating his last night at the club before leaving MN for China. The night’s sets started off with The Artist Formerly Known As jams and escalated into full booty dancing on the ol’ VFW juke box kinda night. Scantily dressed clowns danced alongside the somewhat dejected Kennwood-ers, who exhibitied true Minnesotan-sportsmanship.

Possibly the best ever use of Nite Brite.

When questioned about their lack of costumes in the face of the triumphant clowns, one player retorted, “Do you know how much planning that takes and how much we don’t give a fuck?” A teammate added, “They go hiking for fun.” Either way, the party was worth it and there’s always next year.

Later that week the T? got in on the game. Having beefed up on our Basketball Bidness all summer on the Stueben courts, it was awesome to ball at the regular Thursday afternoon game played by the Artist Basketball League at Lyndale Farmstead Park. We ran into artist Jesse Draxler near the California studios on the way and he assured us that the game was collegiate. “Sometimes we play 11 year olds,” he said as we parted ways.

Draxler wasn’t kidding, at the half court game there were four artists and ballers Malachi, 11, and Xavier, 8. What he didn’t mention is that 11 year olds are sharks, just running back and forth steady scoring. Informing me that he “didn’t like art,” Malachi showed me his moves, the low dribble, the layup. Xavier followed suit, dribbling between his legs along the side of the court. Impressive.

Artist Basketball League’s Thursday game.

Serendipitously, that day our old tubing buddy, Sara Caron, got in touch right around the time of the game to invite me to the Blue Dress Cup. If you didn’t already know, Blue Dress Cup is an annual competition to determine the Best Artist in Milwaukee.

We’re pretty sure you don’t have to be from Milwaukee to be the best artist in the city, so why not apply now? We definitely think Malachi has a fighting chance despite his aesthetic apathy (maybe in part because of it). I want to see what happens when Minnesotans meet Wisconsinites meet Illinoisians (?) on the field of battle. See you on September 20th in Milwaukee for the summer and sports’ real final hurrah. Tri-state tournament anyone?

T around Town(s)

After visiting Minneapolis recently for Bad at Sports’ participation in Open Field at the Walker, WTT? was excited to return for a longer and more in depth visit to the MN art scene. After a week we don’t know the true definition of “Minnesota Nice”, but we found MN dwellers to be genuinely nice, chill people to hang out with. Oh yeah, and the art wasn’t half bad either. We found the artists we met to be a proud and supportive group with just enough buzz. It’s kind of like being in Chicago, but nicer, and cuter (super compliment) and with better bike trails. Here’s just a sampling of what we saw on our TC getaway.

First on our Nathaniel Smith sponsored tour was Soo Visual Art Center in Uptown we were caught Lovesickness with Trees: Recent Work by Sophia Heymans and Garrett Perry.

We had heard about SooVAC and Soo Local from Negative Jam on our last trip, so we checked it off our list first thing. Word on the street is that the Local space is pretty rad, but we unfortunately just missed the closing of Congruent Influence, a collaborative show between Mark Schoening and Drew Peterson. Carolyn Payne was way cool, we talked shop and it seems obvious that Soo’s got big things coming on the horizon.

Work by Sophia Heymans on view at what the locals call “SooVAC.”

Work by Garrett Perry on view at what the locals call “SooVAC.”

SooVAC ED, Carolyn Payne with Nathaniel Smith in the gallery.

We also managed to battle our way into a few studios during our trip. An old friend from our SAIC daze, printmaker Drew Peterson, invited us to lunch at the teeniest Tiny Diner and then showed us his to his studio in the Powderhorn neighborhood, east of Uptown. We were stunned by the surprisingly painterly pixel paintings of Mathew Zefeldt at his studio at the University of Minneapolis. Right before we left we were able to squeeze in a visit with Nate Young, more on that later.

We want to tell you all about the beet tagine we had with Drew at Tiny Diner, but this isn’t Instagram.

The Weatherman Report

Work by Drew Peterson, from his series Waterworks 2013-14.

Our favorite work, a sweet and sold(!) fire butt by Garrett Perry.

Peterson’s Waterworks series in his studio.

Peterson has been busy since we both left SAIC. This and the other unique screen prints he showed me are destined for the artist’s solo show in the fall.

Peterson in his studio, the type of tight and well organized space you’d expect from a seasoned screen printer.

Mathew Zefeldt’s studio at the University of Minneapolis. The artist is working on his upcoming show at the Minneapolis Institute of the Art, opening October 16th. We heard there’s wallpaper involved. Excited.

Zefeldt looking svelte in his studio.

Not only were these paintings clearly a glorious mindfuck, they also include the last two video games I remember playing as a child. I fucking loved killing Nazis in Wolfenstein.

Despite the digital feel of the paintings, Zefeldt doesn’t even touch photoshop. This “mood board” is his way of testing out aspects of the painting before committing them to canvas.

We had a chance to visit some of the major cultural institutions, most notably the Walker (can’t get enough!) and the Minnesota State Fair, where you can see sculptures made of butter and “The Miracle of Life” barn (too real for this city mouse). We partook of all of the mini donuts and cookie buckets we could muster at the fair and had our minds freaking blown away by the awesomeness of the Walker. The Flux exhibit was pretty cool but the Radical Presence exhibition was well, radical (as you might expect), featuring 36 artists and over 100 works spanning the 1960’s to the present there were a ton of blockbusters, lots of Chicago favorites. It’s an exhibition that really can change the way you think about art. Oh yeah, and OMG! The Clock! Who even needs the east coast? We have everything we need right here in the middle.

No caption necessary. At the Minnesota State Fair.

There were more items and artifacts from Lorraine O’Grady than we’ve ever seen it one place. It was resplendent.

A image from O’Grady’s series Mlle. Bourgeoise Noire.

Detail of sculpture/video work Jacolby Satterwhite on view in Radical Presence at the Walker.

Installation view of work in Radical Presence.

Video by Kalup Linzy at Radical Presence.

Saturday night, David Petersen Gallery had an opening that we were tipped off too by our buddy Nathan Coutts from Midway. Probably the most chi-chi thing we did in MN, the exhibition, What Was The Question was replete with NY artists, Joshua Abelow, Sadie Laska, MacGregor Harp and Adrianne Rubenstein mingling with the Minneapolitians. We were particularly fond of Rubenstein’s beach umbrellas and I don’t think we were the only ones.

The turnout for What Was the Question at David Petersen.

Midwest meets Midwest. Andrea Hyde and Cory Schires at the Petersen opening Saturday night.

Aforementioned paintings by Adrianne Rubenstein.

B@S fan Nate Lee with Rubenstein and Joshua Abelow at What Was The Question.

Last but super not least, we were lucky to meet up with Nate Young on his way back from the Black Artist Retreat in Chicago on our way back to the city. Everyone in Minneapolis was pointing us to The Bindery Projects in St. Paul, the space that Young runs with his wife and fellow artist, Caroline Kent. Young was MN nice enough to open up the space for us so we could see Zachary Fabri’s solo show, Video is Dead (he’s also in Radical Presence at the Walker). The spacious and industrial alternative space has two large exhibition spaces, installed with images and a game board/ assemblage of dice and painted chicken bones in one room and a video called The Execution of Lady Jane Grey, which was shot outside the Apollo on the day Michael Jackson died in the other. We also got to check out Young’s studio in the background and even explore the old factory building a bit before emarking on the long ride home.

Installation view of Fabri’s show at Bindery Projects.

Detail of Morgan Freeman image from Fabri’s ongoing series, Aureola.

The formidable Young in his studio.

Work by Nate Young in his studio.

Our last minute trip to The Bindery Projects was definitely the most clutch way to close our trip to the Twin Cities. We’re happy to finally wind down in Chicago, but this summer we’ve learned there’s good T to be had all over the Midwest. Until next time, Wisconsin, Twin Cities!




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (8/16-8/18)

August 15, 2013 · Print This Article

1. LA INTRUSA DANZA at Defibrillator

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Performance by Delta Victor, Rojo Manso, Sara Holwerda and Sara Zalek. Presented by Spain Arts and Culture and Defibrillator.

Defibrillator is located at 1136 N. Milwaukee Ave. Performance Saturday & Sunday, 8-11pm.

2. Think First, Shoot Later: Photography from the MCA Collection at Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

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Work by Thomas Ruff, Andreas Gursky, and Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, Rodney Graham, and Stan Douglas, Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, Ana Mendieta, James Welling, Wolfgang Tillmans, Torbjorn Rodland, and Elad Lassry.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is located at 220 E. Chicago Ave. Exhibition runs from May 18 to Nov 10.

3.The Universe Next Door at Art Institute of Chicago

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Work by Abelardo Morell.

Art Institute of Chicago is located at 111 S. Michigan Ave. Exhibition runs from June 1 to Sept 2.

4. Cliff (2012) and Better (2013) at Logan Center for the Arts

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Work by William Pope.L

Logan Center for the Arts is located at 915 E. 60th St.

5. Transfiguration at 33 Contemporary Gallery

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Work by Alfonso Piloto Nieves.

33 Contemporary Gallery is located at 1029 W. 35th St. Reception Friday, 7-10pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (4/26-4/28)

April 25, 2013 · Print This Article

1. Forlesen at The Renaissance Society

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Work by William Pope.L.

The Renaissance Society is located at 5811 S. Ellis Ave. Reception Sunday, 4-7pm.

2. Anyone Who’s Everyone at DOCUMENT

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Work by Suara Wilitoff.

Document is located at 845 W. Washington Blvd. #3f. Reception Friday, 5-8pm.

3. Breathing at Tritriangle

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Work by Hiba Ali, Evelin Garza-Luna, HaeJoo Jung, Eunice Kim, Robin McKay, Peter Nichols, SunMin Park, Nathaniel Stone, Liang Su, Sarah Verhoeve, Blanche Vivian Villarouge, Jason Williams and Darya Zorina.

Tritriangle is located at 1550 N. Milwaukee Ave. Fl. 3

4. the fiction is outside at PSA Projects

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Work by Dan Paz.

PSA Projects is located at 2509 N. Lawndale Ave. Reception Sunday, 8-10pm.

5. Apocalypto Nouveau at Firecat Projects

 

Work by David Tanimura.

Firecat Projects is located at 2124 N. Damen Ave. Reception Friday, 7-9pm.