Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/13 & 7/14)

July 12, 2012 · Print This Article

1. Heaven Gallery’s Twelve Year Anniversary Exhibition at Heaven Gallery

Work by Marvin Astorga, Jason Lazarus, Stephen Burks, Max Reinhardt, Robert Burnier, Matt Sauermilch, Jessica Taylor Caponigro, Morgan Sims, Stephen Eichhorn, Greg Stimac, Adam Hoff, Kelly Walker, and Scott Jarrett.

Heaven Gallery is located at 1550 N. Milwaukee Ave. 2nd Fl. Reception Friday, 7-11pm.

2. Nowhere Woods at Chicago Printmakers Collaborative

Work by Sanya Glisic.

Chicago Printmakers Collaborative is located at 4642 N. Western Ave. Reception Saturday, 5-8pm.

3. Installed at Catherine Edelman Gallery

Work by Keliy Anderson-Staley, John Cyr, Elizabeth Ernst, Myra Greene, and Gregory Scott.

Catherine Edelman Gallery is located at 300 W. Superior St. Reception Friday, 5-8pm.

4. Slumscapes at Bert Green Fine Art

Work by Jeff Gillette.

Bert Green Fine Art is located at 8 S. Michigan Ave. Suite 1220. Reception Saturday, 4-7pm.

5. Un Body at Happy Dog Gallery

Work by Young Joon Kwak and Josh Minkus.

Happy Dog Gallery is located at 1542 N. Milwaukee Ave. 2nd fl. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/22 & 7/23)

July 21, 2011 · Print This Article

1. Habitual Growth at Fill in the Blank Gallery

Work by Alexis Ortiz, Julia Gootzeit, and Katie Schofield.

Fill in the Blank Gallery is located at 5038 N. Lincoln Ave. Reception Friday, from 7-11pm.

2. On the Beach: Works in Progress Slideshows at Iceberg

Work by Zoe Strauss.

Iceberg is located at 7714 N. Sheridan Rd. Reception Saturday, from 6-9pm.

3. For a long time, all I could do was surrender at Spoke

Work by Marissa Perel.

Spoke is located at 119 N Peoria St, 3D. Performance Saturday, from 5-8pm.

4. Chromophobia Summer Reception at Chromopobia

Work by Eric Kaepplinger, Eric Cortez, and Joseph Palmer.

Chromopobia is located at 2303 N Oakley #1B. Reception Friday, from 6-10pm.

5. Heaven Gallery turns 11 at Heaven Gallery

Work by Montgomery Perry Smith, Adam Hoff, Stephen Eichhorn, Max Reinhardt, Matt Sauermilch and more.

Heaven Gallery is located at 1550 N Milwaukee Ave #2. Reception Friday, from 7-11pm.




Mantras for Plants: An Interview with The Plant Journal

June 20, 2011 · Print This Article

Next up in our Mantras for Plants series, artist Heidi Norton and I interview Cris Merino, Isa Merino and Carol Montpart, the directorial team behind The Plant Journal, a biannual magazine based in Barcelona, Spain (The journal’s editor is Cris Merino, and its art directors/graphic designers are Isa Merino and Carol Montpart).  The Plant Journal’s editorial statement describes the publication as follows:

Besides providing botanical contents in a simple, personal and cozy way, The Plant Journal offers to plant lovers a new look on greenery by featuring the works of creative people who also love plants. As a curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery, the magazine presents a monographic on a specific plant and brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers and visual artists, both established and emerging, from all over the world, to share with The Plant Journal their perceptions and experiences around plants.

We love that their focus is simply on “plants,” yet that subject alone can take them in an infinite number of cultural directions. Also note that Plant Journal’s Spring/Summer 2011 issue features the mind-blowing photo-collages of Chicago artist Stephen Eichhorn! You can subscribe to this print-only journal by going here. We want to thank Cris, Isa, and Carol for answering our questions!

 

Heidi Norton: How was The Plant Journal conceived? Who are your readers? What types of people, places, things are featured?

Editors: We suppose everything began when we realized that every time we had to make a gift, it was a plant. And our friends do the same with us. Plants arrive to your home, you care of them and you establish quite a special relationship with them. Furthermore, as we love publications, especially in paper,  we thought that it will be a beautiful idea to create a magazine completely dedicated to plants, since we didn’t find any that gave plants the relevance and the approach we had in mind.

The magazine is addressed to people more or less like us, who enjoy plants even if they seem incapable of keeping them alive, people who feel inspired by greenery and whose creativity is open to establishing connections with plants. That’s why in The Plant Journal you can find photographers, illustrators, designers, chefs, etc. Probably they are also our readers. On the other hand, since plants spread out whenever they want to without asking anyone’s permission, we look for them wherever they are, in their own natural habitat, but also in our cities, homes, offices, etc.

Claudine Ise: Yes, I really like how you use the subject of plants as a jumping off point to talk about a range of subjects — music, art, film, and other areas of culture. The essay that looked at how houseplants were arranged in some of Eric Rohmer’s films as a way to investigate his approach to formalism is a great example of this. Can you talk about how you solicit articles for the journal – what kinds of essays hold appeal?

Eds: We were thinking about the connections between cinema and plants, so we looked for Lope Serrano (from Canada productions www.lawebdecanada.com). He writes articles for a cultural magazine from Barcelona, and we knew about his vast visual and cinematographic knowledge. And it was Lope himself, during a chat, who suggested the connection between the ethical and aesthetic formalism of many of Rohmer’s films and the plants that appear in some scenes. As we admire Rohmer’s films, we loved this approach. The result is a very academic and didactic article that completely fits with the aim of the magazine. But in general, there’s a little bit of everything in the articles. There are some that are proposed by its authors and others cases when we explain a general idea to the writer and then, after exchanging ideas, we reach an agreement. In the case of sections such as “My plants by” or the interviews, our work is about finding the right person. That’s why it is very important for us to have a wide network of contributors who share our interests.

 

HN: The introduction that you use to promote the journal states, “providing botanical contents in a simple, personal and cozy way.”  Can you explain what you mean by “cozy”? I ask because, there is something “cozy” about plants,  an unpretentiousness that makes places, objects, spaces, and materials more accessible.

Eds: With ‘cozy’ we want to emphasize and vindicate the affection for plants. At least in Barcelona, people don’t use plants as much as we would like in the way that you explain. So we think it’s not always obvious that plants are cozy by nature. You sometimes have to stop and think about it, and that was one of the reasons to create The Plant Journal. We had an example of this a few days ago. We created an installation with plants and macramé for the magazine launch party in Otrascosas de Villarosàs gallery in Barcelona. The space also contains the meeting room for an important advertisement agency, with its typical big table and nothing else. Well, yesterday Marc (who is responsible for the space) told us that since plants were there, people want to have the meetings next to them, and they even asked him to leave them there. That’s nice, because plants have made that room a better place. And nobody there thought about it until now! That’s why we thought we must emphasize the coziness of plants.

 

Launch party at Otrascosas de Villarrosas. Photo by Adrià Cañameras

CI: Your journal’s content isn’t available online. Do you think it’s important, conceptually or otherwise, that the journal remain a paper publication that is circulated “on the streets,” as opposed to via cyberspace/the internet?

Eds: As we love publications, we like to go to a bookshop or a newsstand, choose a book or a magazine and then read and enjoy it calmly in your place. You can get it back whenever you want to, you can collect them, write on them, cut them out, etc. It might be fetishism or nostalgia, but we think that the experience of paper is more accessible, relaxed and intimate. It is obvious that the Internet offers a lot of opportunities for a publication (starting with the production costs, always more expensive in paper), but we never doubt it: the magazine is printed in paper, an object that in addition is beautiful. We will create some different contents for our site, but they will be more casual and fast consuming contents specifically created for the Internet. For us, it is priceless: the Sunday aperitif with the daily papers and that feeling is something a screen will never give you, no matter what the possibilities that an iPad can give to you.

HN: What things are inspiring you today, right now?

Eds: We are now very interested in rediscovering traditions that seem to be ignored because of the high-speed way of life and the anxiousness for new stuff. That means we get inspired by and enjoy cooking for friends, going on a trip looking for mushrooms in the countryside, caring for our little gardens, knitting macrame, etc. All kinds of domestic, simple and everyday activities that make your life better. As music, cinema, arts and books also do.

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Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/30-8/1)

July 29, 2010 · Print This Article

It’s a slim weekend, and one I’m going to miss entirely because I’m headed out to Nevada City (no, it’s not in Nevada). But if I were here, these are what I’d try and hit up. In order of appearance…

1. Religare: Artists explore the concept of Religion at Antena

And I quote, “”Religare”: according to Tom Harpur and Joseph Campbell the word Religion derives from the Latin word “ligare” which means “bind, connect”, and combined with the prefix “re”= re-ligare, i.e. re (again) + ligare or “to reconnect”. For this art exhibit, artists will create work that analizes and critiques the concept of religion.” Works by Saul Aguirre, Eddie Alvarado, Miguel Cortez, Rakel Delgado, Rocky Horton, James Jankowiak, Antonio Martinez, Laura Olear, Josue Pellot, Polly Perez, Jenny Priego, Elvia Rodriguez-Ochoa, and Sebastian Vallejo.

Antena is located at 1765 S Laflin St. Reception is Friday, from 6-10pm.

2. Stephen Eichhorn at A+D Gallery

For the conclusion of this summer’s Digital Artist Residency Program at Columbia College, Stephen Eichorn will be presenting work in the A+D Gallery. Eichorn was the Summer Resident Artist and will be presenting collages created during his residency. A one night only event.

A+D Gallery is located in  Columbia College Chicago, 619 S. Wabash Ave. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

3. Sixth Annual Printers Ball

The Printers Ball is back! Presented annually by the Center for Book & Paper Arts at Columbia College, this all night Friday event is not to be missed. Make sure you check the calendar for lead up events as well. The Ball presents thousands of publications, music, readings, demonstrations, and much more.

The Printers Ball will be held at The Ludington Building at Columbia College Chicago, 1104 S. Wabash Ave. The main event is Friday, from 6-11pm.

4. Double Face Fantasy at Thomas Robertello Gallery

A new installation “best viewed after dark from the sidewalk” at Robertello. Collaborators Jason Robert Bell and Marni Kotak, “[use] the application of paint to uncover flesh, the lovers find themselves quite literally emerging through the eyes of their soulmate. The messy sensuality of this play showcases their obvious pleasure, but also probes deeper issues of connection, self, and spiritual union.”

Thomas Robertello Gallery is located at 939 W. Randolph St. Show begins on Saturday night.

5. The bottom of photos that look up at the sky and other observations at Julius Cæsar

The title says a lot of it. A descriptive text based show of work by Carrie Gundersdorf.

Julius Cæsar is located at 3144 W Carroll Ave, 2G. Reception is Sunday, from 4-7pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (6/25 & 6/26)

June 24, 2010 · Print This Article

1. In A Plain Brown Wrapper at Johalla Projects

Not for kids. Literally, you have to be 18 or over to enter. Work by Steven Frost, Elisa Garza, Elise Goldstein, Emerson Granillo, Jesse Hites, Jacob King, Ivan Lozano, Joelle McTigue, Karina Natis, Clare O’Sadnick, Edward Rossa, Joshua Sampson, Talaya Schmid, Kristen Stokes, Jaroslaw Studencki, Bu Tu, Wayama Woo, and Meredith Zielke. Organized by Barbara DeGenevieve.

Johalla Projects is located at 1561 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Saturday from 7-10pm

2. Ox-Bow Centennial Two-fer: Historical Works at Corbett vs. Dempsey and Contemporary Art at Roots and Culture.

Two exhibitions celebrating the Centennial festivities for the Ox-Bow Summer School of Art.

Corbett vs. Dempsey is located at 1120 N Ashland Ave. Reception Saturday from 5-9pm. Roots and Culture is located at 1034 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Saturday from 6-9pm.

3. There, Now It Will Last Forever at The Family Room

Work by Stephen Eichhorn, James Ewert Jr, Ron Ewert, Mike Fortress, Jenny Kendler, Michael Ruggirello, Molly Schafer, Ben Speckmann, Davey Sommers, Scott Thomas and INDO.

The Family Room is located at 1821 W. Hubbard St., #202. Reception Friday from 7pm-12am.

4. Sangre, Sudor y Papeles: Artists examine the immigration issue at Antena

Work by Saul Aguirre, Adriana Baltazar, Miguel Cortez, Salvador Jiménez-Flores, Jaime Mendoza, Jenny Priego, and Elvia Rodriguez-Ochoa.

Antena is located at 1765 S Laflin St. Reception Friday from 6-10pm.

5. No Money No Pancakes at Second Bedroom

Something weird’ll be going on. BYOB but there’s free waffles.

Second Bedroom is located at 3216 S. Morgan St. Reception Saturday from 7-11pm.