Top 5 Weekend Picks! (5/10-5/12)

May 9, 2013 · Print This Article

1. Black Damp at Johalla Projects

soap-600x505

Work by Jessica Taylor Caponigro.

Johalla Projects is located at 1821 W. Hubbard St. Reception Saturday, 7-10pm.

2. No Gods No Masters at Chicago Artists’ Coalition

Butcher_GodsMasters_HighRes

Work by Jesse Butcher, James Green, and Christopher Meerdo.

Chicago Artists’ Coalition is located at 217 N. Carpenter St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

3. Abstracting the Seam at Hyde Park Art Center

Ozinga_20quilt_20small

Work by Shannon Kerrigan, Christopher Michlig, Patrick McDonough, Sarah Nishiura, Andrew Rigsby, Hans Sundquist and Stacia Yeapanis.

Hyde Park Art Center is located at 5020 S. Cornell Ave. Reception Sunday, 3-5pm.

4. DARK STAR at Roots & Culture

show72

Work by Tim Brown and Rimas Simaitis.

Roots & Culture is located at 1034 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

5. Calamity at Chicago Art Department

TW_Banner1-600x369

Work by Thomas Wolfe.

Chicago Art Department is located at 1932 S. Halsted St. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (5/11-5/13)

May 11, 2012 · Print This Article

1. The Long Stare at Andrew Rafacz Gallery

Work by Greg Stimac

Andrew Rafacz Gallery is located at 835 W. Washington. Reception Saturday, 4-7pm.

2. Over and Over Again at Chicago Artists’ Coalition

Work by Stacia Yeapanis

Chicago Artists’ Coalition is located at 217 N. Carpenter St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.  

3. Kristina Paabus and David Leggett at Hinge Gallery

Work by Kristina Paabus and David Leggett

Hinge Gallery is located at 1955 W. Chicago Ave. Reception Saturday, 6-9pm.

4. 1:1 at Happy Collaborationists Exhibition Space

Work by Olivia Valentine

Happy Collaborationists Exhibition Space is located at 1254 N. Noble St. Reception Saturday, 6-10pm.

5. Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing at Public Works

Work by Aesthetic Apparatus, Ashkahn, Scott, Barry, Deanne Cheuk, Josh Cochran, Michael Coleman, Jim Datz, DEMO, Rachel Domm, E. Rock, Anna Giertz, J. Namdev Hardisty, Steven Harrington, Maya Hayuk, Andrew Holder, Gluekit, Cody Hudson, Imeus Design, Jeremyville, Kaleidophant, Landland, Daniel Luedtke, David Maron, Marque & Anna Wolf, Blake E. Marquis, Scott Massey, Garrett Morin, Rinzen, Andy Mueller, Chris Silas Neal, Mike Perry, Pietari Posti, Luke Ramsey, Seripop, Chris Rubino, Nathaniel Russell, Joel Speasmaker, Marcroy Smith, Andy Smith, Sonnenzimmer, Jim Stoten, James Victore, and Hannah Waldron.

Public Works is located at 1539 N. Damen Ave. Reception Friday, 7-10pm.




Off-Topic | Stacia Yeapanis

December 3, 2009 · Print This Article

Off-Topic invites artists, curators, writers, and cultural workers to discuss a subject not directly related to the practice of making art. We would like to welcome Stacia Yeapanis as our latest guest with her post, “My Feminism is 80s Teen Movie Favored”. Stacia is a Chicago based interdisciplinary artist who’s first monograph was recently published as part of The Museum of Contemporary Photography’s Midwest Photographers Publication Project this past spring.

My Feminism is 80s Teen Movie Flavored

Stacia Yeapanis

Not many people remember the teen movie The Legend of Billie Jean. Expected to be a box office hit in the summer of 1985, it disappointed producers, earning a measly $3.5 million, and has yet to be released on DVD. This movie is why I still own a VCR.

The plot is simple: Billie Jean Davy is a teenage girl from a trailer park, who becomes an outlaw after being involved in an accidental shooting. She goes on the run with her friends and cuts her hair and becomes a celebrity hero seeking justice. The tagline, according to IMDB, is “When you’re seventeen, people think they can do anything to you. Billie Jean is about to prove them wrong.”

I was 7, not 17, when it was first released. I can’t remember exactly when or where I watched it for the first time. I remember that I believed the main conflict was between kids and adults. There’s no doubt the movie was marketed to the MTV generation. The theme song, Invincible by Pat Benatar, had already made it to #10 before the movie was released. I probably related to the movie because I was a kid and because life constantly feels unfair when you’re a kid.

But when I re-watched The Legend of Billie Jean at age 31, it was obvious to me that this overlooked teen movie is about more than a rebellious teen’s sense that her parents aren’t fair because they make her clean her room or get off the phone and do her homework. For me, it’s one of my earliest feminist texts (and a scathing critique of capitalism, but that’s another post). Watching it was like having myself and my experience of the world mirrored back to me. I don’t mean that I’ve ever cut my hair short or been an outlaw or slept at an abandoned mini golf course. I just mean that I must have learned something watching this movie over and over again. And it’s something I value. Read more




Chicago Curators’ “Performance Anxiety” on Souvenirs from the Earth TV

December 2, 2009 · Print This Article

James Murray, "Electrical Performances: Push It."

James Murray, "Electrical Performances: Push It."

Wanna talk about new modes of global curation? Chicago-based arts writer Alicia Eler and video collector Jefferson Godard have teamed up to curate Performance Anxiety, a program of seven short videos by  Chicago and New York City-based artists which can only be seen in Europe via Souvenirs from the Earth, a cable television station broadcast in France on the freebox 129 station and in Germany on Unitymedia/Kabel BW. (Eler and Godard are currently in discussions about screening the program in Chicago sometime in January).

Eler is the Arts and Culture Community Manager for the Tribune-sponsored Chicago Now blog network, and Godard is a video art collector,  architecture professor and a founding member of EMERGE, the MCA Chicago’s Collector’s Forum. They met during Video as Video: Rewind to Form, a video art show that Eler curated with Peregrine Honig at Swimming Pool Project Space last Fall, and bonded over their mutual love of video art. When Godard invited Eler to his home for a tour of his collection, she was struck by the fact that so many works of video art were actually on display. “There’s always video art on in Jefferson’s home–he’s admittedly obsessed with the medium. A video might play on two flatscreen televisions while a video projection screens in another room; or a video might play on an actual television while Jefferson views new video art online.” Most of the videos in Performance Anxiety have been drawn from Godard’s superb collection (for more on Godard’s collecting habits, read Jason Foumberg’s 2007 article in New City here). Read more




Friday’s Twitter Roundup

July 24, 2009 · Print This Article

Photobucket

Friday’s Links Roundup is now becoming Friday’s Twitter Roundup. It just makes more sense. On this week’s short roundup  we have drunk people in yoga positions (ouch!), The Renaissance Society posts a video with director Susanne Ghez, and I reveal that I was in a steel drum band in high school. Have a great weekend everyone.

Drunk People Yoga Positions. Entertaining in a sad way.

Oxymoron of the day: custom Channel motorcycle.

Watching a demo of the Augmented Reality app on Plural Blog.

Did anyone check out MP3 II: Curtis Mann, John Opera, Stacia Yeapanis at the MoCP this weekend?

I was in a steel drum band in high school. This brings back memories. (via TWBE)

RT: @RenSoc New RenSoc video: Director Susanne Ghez interviews artist Judy Ledgerwood.

Yes! Newberry Book Fair starts tomorrow. Be sure to check it out before it ends this Sunday

RT @ChiGalleryNews Randolph St. Market takes place in the West Loop this weekend. Happy hunting!

Zaha Hadid’s delayed Burnham Plan Centennial pavilion in Millennium Park might still open in early August.