Tony Matelli Lectures at Columbia College WEDNESDAY

November 1, 2010 · Print This Article

Chicago-born, NY-based artist Tony Matelli, who was a guest on Bad at Sports’ Episode 140, will lecture at Columbia College this coming Wednesday, November 3rd. On Matelli, from the the A + D website: “his hyper-real, playful, and often dark sculptural works and installations invite viewers to look at scenes that are overlooked, ignored, or altogether avoided.” This should be good, so mark your calendars as follows:

TONY MATELLI
Wednesday, November 3
6:30 pm
Hokin Lecture Hall
623 S. Wabash, Rm. 109
A reception with the artist will take place immediately after the lecture in the A+D Gallery.

Tony Matelli. Josh, 2010. Silicone, hair, fiberglass, steel and clothes.




Louise Bourgeois 1911-2010

June 1, 2010 · Print This Article

louise-bourgeoisLouise Bourgeois passed away Monday in New York’s Beth Israel Medical Center at the age of 98 two days after a heart attack.

Her collection of work is widely known, diverse, fun and she will be missed.

Louise who was inducted into the U.S. National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2009 is survived by two sons, Alain & Jean Louis, as well as by two grandchildren and a great-grandchild. Her husband and a third son, Michel, predeceased her.




Christophe Roberts’ Nike Shoe Box Sculptures

May 8, 2010 · Print This Article

You saw Christophe’s work in the Next section of Art Chicago this year but maybe you didn’t know much about the Chicago based artist behind it? Here is a few videos to help clear that picture.




Sculptor Chris Antemann Awarded $35,000 Grant

May 2, 2010 · Print This Article

Antemann Detail - Tea Party - Ferrin GallerySculptor Chris Antemann will receive the first prize grant award of $35,000 from the Virginia A. Groot Foundation offered since 1988 to artists working in 3D.

Antemann, a sculptor creates contemporary erotic works in porcelain dealing with intimacy, love, and power in post-modern relationships.  Inspired by 18th C. porcelain figurines, their place in the home, and the social contexts that are inherited by such materials & history.

Represented by Ferrin Gallery, Antemann is exhibiting recent sculpture and photography from her series “Battle of the Britches” at Art Chicago through Monday, May 3.




Interview with Ali Bailey

April 14, 2010 · Print This Article

Ali Bailey, "It's the Real Thing," installation view at Andrew Rafacz Gallery

I profiled Ali Bailey last year on the occasion of his solo debut in Chicago at Golden Gallery, an exhibition titled “You are Young” (the piece appeared in New City; you can read it here). Bailey is definitely what I’d consider to be ‘a comer.’ (Isn’t that a terrible word to apply to artists? It has such unfortunate equine associations). His works sold well at last year’s Next Fair at Art Chicago – no small feat in an extreme down market – and he’s already busted out with his second Chicago solo show, at Andrew Rafacz: a startling new body of work that he thinks is his most complicated to date. I agree. Bailey’s sculptures have changed a lot since his first exhibition, and I wanted to talk to him in greater depth about the progression from that last body of work to this one.  Sadly for Chicago, Bailey’s next big move is a geographic one: he’ll be setting up digs in Los Angeles soon because his wife, artist and curator Kristen Van Deventer, will be attending graduate school there. I am very grateful to Ali for taking the time to provide such well-considered answers to my often clumsy and inordinately detailed questions. His show continues through May 8th at Andrew Rafacz Gallery.

CI: The most obvious shift or change that’s apparent in your new body of work at Andrew Rafacz is that it is much more abstract than the group of sculptures shown at the “You Are Young” show at Golden last year. That earlier work drew upon recognizable and sometimes even iconic imagery: a basketball and a baseball, an ice cream cone, a tree stump covered in gum and graffiti. Your latest work still gives me the feeling that there are exterior referents at play but now they seem more art historical and less pop-cultural. For example, I saw in your use of the grey felt material in the piece East Meets West / Worked Out a little Beuys joke, I loved how it’s slung over a sculpture that looks like a looming, abstracted version of a Stairmaster or some other type of exercise equipment that quickly becomes ‘useless’ and soon comes to function primarily as a clothes hanger. Can you tell me a little bit about this shift between the two bodies of work — what have you been thinking about lately that’s caused this move towards less immediately recognizable forms?

AB: You’re right about there being a distinct move toward a more abstract language, both in terms of subject and form and in a way, this shift is a direct result of problems that I’ve created for myself. For me, the last body of work operated in two different ways and that was very important. On one level it was about objecthood in a broad sense, making (and the presence of the hand), and a kind of tension resulting from a push-pull dynamic between inherent contradictions in the work and a kind of Gober-esque uncanny. The other prominent characteristic of the work was a pop-cultural critique and I suppose that this is where you could talk about the poetic content and the more accessible qualities the works had. In these ways I think the work was successful. The thing that really didn’t work and this is what I’ve been battling with recently, is being able to convey a distancing or a kind of knowing-naivety or to set up a dialogue that talks about authenticity. In my mind, it was clear that what I was presenting was not authentic in any sense nor was it really concerned with being ‘truthful’ – I was trying to examine certain narrative tropes but instead ended up giving people an easy out – they often never got further than the narrative or the overt poetic strand of the idea. Read more