Episode 534: Jitish Kallat

December 4, 2015 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download

jitish_kallat_eclipse
This week, Mumbai-based artist Jitish Kallat returns to Bad at Sports, this time from San Francisco, where he sits down with Patricia Maloney. Listeners may remember Kallat’s first appearance on the podcast on the eve of the opening for his large-scale installation, Public Notice 3 (2010-11), in the Fullerton Hall stairwell of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Kallat, one of the most prominent figures of contemporary Asian art, works across a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, and video. He was the curator for the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, India in 2014. This year, Kallat has had several solo exhibitions, including Jitish Kallat: Public Notice 2, at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney. His Paris exhibition, The Infinite Episode, opened at the Galerie Templon in September 2015. Kallat’s large permanent public sculpture unveiled in Austria in October 2015.

Jitish-Kallat-in-Studiosmall

His solo exhibitions include Epilogue (2013-14) at the San Jose Museum of Art; Circa at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne, Australia (2012); Fieldnotes: Tomorrow was here Yesterday at the Bhau Daji Lad Museum, Mumbai, India (2011); Likewise at Arndt, Berlin, Germany (2010); The Astronomy of the Subway at Haunch of Venison, London, UK (2010); Aquasaurus at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, Paddington, Australia (2008) and Lonely Facts at the Kunsthalle Luckenwalde, Luckenwalde, Germany (1998).

 

Kallat has participated in major exhibitions, including: India: Art Now at the Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark (2012-13); Indian Highway IV at MAXXI, Rome, Italy (2012) and at Musée d’art contemporain de Lyon, Lyon, France (2011); The Empire Strikes Back: Indian Art Today at Saatchi Gallery, London, UK (2010); Chalo! India: A New Era of Indian Art at Essl Museum – Contemporary Art, Klosterneuburg, Austria and at Mori Art Museum, Tokyo (both 2009), as well as Indian Highway at the Serpentine Gallery, London, UK (2008-09); Die Tropen. Ansichten von der Mitte der Weltkugel at Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany (2008); Urban Manners at Hangar Bicocca, Milan, Italy

(2007) and Century City at Tate Modern, London, UK (2001).




Episode 504: Tanya Zimbardo

April 27, 2015 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download
Tanya Zimbardo
This week Brian and Patricia sit down with curator Tanya Zimbardo during her residency at Krowswork, a center for Video and Visionary Art, in Oakland. Tanya is a San Francisco-based curator. Her research and writing is primarily centered on conceptual art and experimental media in California in the 1970s and 1980s. She is co-curating the group survey Public WorksArtists’ Interventions 1970s – Now at Mills College Art Museum this fall.

As the Assistant Curator of Media Arts at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, she curated select film and video screenings and co-organized the past two SECA Art Award exhibitions and overview Fifty Years of Bay Area Art: The SECA Awards, among other exhibitions. She has contributed essays to several SFMOMA publications, most recently West Coast Visions(2015, Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul). As a guest contributor to Open Space (2012?14), Zimbardo highlighted various site works, public interventions, and artist-run spaces in the Bay Area, including Receipt of Delivery, her weekly series featuring exhibition mailers.

The Krowswork Residencies feature a diverse range of visionary artists and artwork—from graffiti to poetry and from elaborate sci-fi video installations to Kabalistic painting. These Krowswork Residents present their own work, host conversations and events, and in some cases present the work of others. Each Resident is implicitly or explicitly in conversation with those who come before and after, as well as in dialogue with the total arc of the year.

http://krowswork.com/tanyazimbardo.html




Episode 456: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon

May 27, 2014 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download
201403_jkgordon_object1_590_0
This week: BAS west coast checks in from the YBCA for a chat with Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon.




Episode 431: Takeshi Murata and Robert Beatty

December 2, 2013 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download

This week: San Francisco checks in with a great interview. Bad at Sports contributors Brian Andrews and Patricia Maloney sat down with artist Takeshi Murata and sound designer Robert Beatty on November 9, 2013, at Ratio 3, in San Francisco, to discuss Murata’s most recent digitally animated video, OM Rider(2013). OM Rider follows two animated creatures: a wizened old man that Andrews describes as “half the Curious George Man in the Yellow Suit, half like the butler from Rocky Horror Picture Show,” and a hipster wolf, which rides a moped through a barren landscape and performs other aimless tasks. The video begins with the creature playing a synthesizer that gives the video its title. Om Rider contains Murata’s characteristic absurd humor and aesthetic, which mixes highly attuned lighting and composition with more retro modeling and minimalist, almost antiseptic spaces.

Takeshi Murata was born in 1974 in Chicago. In 1997, he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design, where he studied film, video, and animation. He currently lives and works in Saugerties, New York. Murata has exhibited at the New Museum, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy; Sikemma Jenkins & Co., New York; Gladstone Gallery, New York; and Salon 94, New York. Murata’s work is featured in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art, Athens; and The Smithsonian Museum of American Art.

FYI, AP will post an excerpted text version of this interview on Dec. 3, and the link for that conversation should be:

http://www.artpractical.com/column/interview-with-takeshi-murata/

And here is a related review Brian wrote for his previous show: http://www.artpractical.com/review/get_your_ass_to_mars_andrews/

431




Wandering SF: SF Public Library

November 13, 2013 · Print This Article

sf-public-library-1

The best thing about living in San Francisco is that I can step out of my apartment and, without any planned route, find an art exhibition that I had no idea was happening.  At the beginning of every month, I like to walk my rent check to my property manager’s office by the Civic Center.  The Civic Center is a cultural crown of jewels in this city with a symphony, ballet, opera, library, and museum surrounding City Hall.  SF is so cool that the city closes the Civic Center for massive events like a concert by Deadmau5 or the 2013 X Games Dew Tour complete with a skate park and dirt bike course.

City Hall

City Hall

Louise M. Davis Symphony Hall

Louise M. Davis Symphony Hall

War Memorial Opera House

War Memorial Opera House

On this particular rent-check-walk, I decided to check out the main branch of the SF Public Library at the Civic Center.  If you’ve seen the 1998 movie City of Angels starring Nicolas Cage and Meg Ryan, then you’ll understand this: it’s the same library that all the angels in black coats visit to read books and stand around looking creepy!  Little did I know that there would not only be one exhibition, but five!  Stumbling across these exhibitions in a space like a public library brought me back to undergrad and learning about the idea of curating.  It’s an interesting position to be curating a show at a library — a local history and audience are engaged primarily with something else in the space (the books) but are somehow casually distracted, entertained, and educated by the exhibition.

SF Public Library main branch

SF Public Library main branch

A part of the exhibition, Three Artists Witness the Occupy Movement: A Plein Air Story.

A part of the exhibition, Three Artists Witness the Occupy Movement: A Plein Air Story.

The first exhibition I accidentally saw was called Three Artists Witness the Occupy Movement: A Plein Air Story.  If it weren’t for the table jutting out in the middle of the walkway, I would have kept on going about my tour of the library, but I paused to see what the enclosed case had to offer.  It was lovely paintings by three different Oakland artists who documented the Occupy Oakland and Occupy San Francisco events.  The placard said “Exhibition continues in cafe wall display case, lower level,” so I decided to see what else was in this show.

The other part of the exhibition, Three Artists Witness the Occupy Movement: A Plein Air Story.

The other part of the exhibition, Three Artists Witness the Occupy Movement: A Plein Air Story.

John Paul Marcelo, The Port Shutdown, 2011. Oil on wood.

John Paul Marcelo, The Port Shutdown, 2011. Oil on wood.

Anthony Holdsworth, Occupy the Port of Oakland, 2011. Oil on Board. 20? x 28?.

Anthony Holdsworth, Occupy the Port of Oakland, 2011. Oil on Board. 20? x 28?.

Jessica Jirsa, Closing of the Ports, December 12th, 2011. Oil on Canvas.

Jessica Jirsa, Closing of the Ports, December 12th, 2011. Oil on Canvas.

The painting show was a lot of fun.  It’s unclear who curated the show based on the text provided, but a little googling on the Internet leads me to believe that the show was originally presented as Occupy: The Plein Air Story and curated by Eric Murphy at Oakland’s Joyce Gordon Gallery last November.  This exhibition cleverly puts three different artists side-by-side for a comparison of the same subject depicted in varying styles. John Paul Marcelo’s The Port Shutdown is an eerie march of shadowy dark figures, Anthony Holdsworth’s Occupy the Port of Oakland (2011) is a bright pastel palette of folks walking towards the sunlight, and Jessica Jirsa’s Closing of the Ports (2011) is a colorful cartoon-like gathering of characters.

 

 

sf-public-library-11

sf-public-library-12

A Little Piece of Mexico: The Postcards of Guillermo Kahlo and His Contemporaries

A Little Piece of Mexico: The Postcards of Guillermo Kahlo and His Contemporaries

After looking at the painting show, I turned around to discover the Mr. and Mrs. George F. Jewett, Jr. Exhibit Gallery and an exhibit titled A Little Piece of Mexico: The Postcards of Guillermo Kahlo and His Contemporaries.  In a place like a library, the contributing parties to making the show possible are a paragraph in itself.  Here’s who is billed as presenting the show: The San Francisco Public Library, the Consulate General of Mexico in San Francisco, the Department of Latina/Latino Studies in the College of Ethnic Studies and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs of San Francisco State University, and City Lights Foundation.  Wow!

sf-public-library-14

sf-public-library-15

sf-public-library-16

 

 

 

The exhibition makes a fantastic case that the cultural identity of Mexico was shaped by the popularity of the photo postcard at the turn of the 20th century.  With images from international photographers like Guillermo Kahlo, Abel Briquet, F. Leon, and CB Waite, the exhibition honors the iconic images that undoubtedly shaped the current contemporary branding of Mexico’s visual identity.  The significance of this show to the local Mexican and Mexican-American population is palpable, while also revealing the country’s heavy influence on San Francisco’s own architecture and landscape design.

sf-public-library-17

sf-public-library-18

 

 

As I walked upstairs to check out a show about tennis, I noticed another show with fabulous architectural renderings.  An exhibition titled UNBUILT: San Francisco spans five venues throughout the city and presents proposals for various buildings and urban spaces within the city that were never realized.  My dad is an architect, so genetically so am I, and so this show was really interesting to me.  Architects also have the best handwriting in the world, so there’s something about architecture and text that is always aesthetically amazing.  As a resident and avid walker of SF for almost five years, I genuinely appreciated seeing these renderings and sketches for spaces that I’ve come to call home — it’s like walking into an artist’s studio or flipping through your old sketch book and seeing thoughts and ideas for past work that just never made it off the page.

sf-public-library-19

sf-public-library-20

Finally, and coincidentally enough for me as a blogger for a blog called Bad at Sports, there were two exhibitions highlighting sports — They Were First: African Americans in Sports and Breaking the Barriers: The ATA and Black Tennis Pioneers.  Both exhibitions provide a more historical context (rather than visual) of the obstacles and triumphs of a marginalized group of athletes.  Simple timelines line the walls of the library with photos and text reminiscent of a history museum show or even the waiting lobby to the “Soarin’ Over California” ride at Disneyland.

Adena Cartsonis, age 9, 2nd place winner for 7-11 category.

Adena Cartsonis, age 9, 2nd place winner for 7-11 category.

The best part of this entire SF Public Library multi-exhibition day was seeing artwork from the winners of an art contest for kids coinciding with Breaking the Barriers.  Northern California kids aged 7 to 18 were asked to portray how they have broken barriers.  As cynical as I’ve become now that I’m 30, there will always be a special place in my life in memory of the art opportunities I got when I was a kid.  Growing up, my suburban New Jersey town offered plenty of art opportunities for kids that I completely devoured: art classes at school, annual art exhibitions at the mall, and contests for different purposes like a banner at an elementary school or the yearbook cover or the town’s New Year’s Eve celebration logo.  How many high school students enroll in AP Art or go through the lengthy submission process for a college art application?  It’s awesome that the library exhibition included this artistic component for the local kids, and its something I believe will be a special introduction for every participant, especially the winners.  Watch out Hugo Boss Prize 2035!

Conclusion?  Who knew a day at the library could be so fun and artsy!