Underfull Table Cloth by Kristine Bjaadal

February 25, 2010 · Print This Article


It seems the big talk coming out of the 2010 Stockholm Furniture Fair is the “Underfull Table Cloth” by Norwegian designer Kristine Bjaadal’s simple damask pattern table cloth with a twist.

Built into the table cloth is a layer with a separate pattern and absorption level so that when a colored liquid is spilled the hidden design (in this case a butterfly pattern) shows through in line with the spill mark. The item is looking for a production agreement but the possibilities are endless and it’s pretty original for a product over 2000 years old.






Hey Norway it is me, Asshat.

September 4, 2008 · Print This Article

isnt it nice?

isn't it nice?

Have you ever wanted to yell out over a valley and a village?  To just let them know your alive and harsh their day?  Well you still can and all you need is a phone.

From Unsworn Industries…
Telemegaphone Dale stands seven meters tall on top of the Bergskletten mountain overlooking the idyllic Dalsfjord in Western Norway.

When you dial the Telemegaphone’s phone number the sound of your voice is projected out across the fjord, the valley and the village of Dale below. PH: +4790369389

Check it out here… http://www.unsworn.org/telemegaphone/




Art stolen for the sum of it’s parts

February 27, 2007 · Print This Article

Canvas hanging in gallery

The banknotes proved too much of a temptation for the thieves

A Norwegian artwork featuring banknotes glued to a canvas has been stolen from the Oslo gallery where it was on show.

The work by artist Jan Christensen, entitled Relative Value, was made up of notes worth 100,000 kroner ($16,300, 12,400 euros).

The robbers got into the gallery by breaking a window.

They then cut each note off the canvas individually and left the 6.5-by-13ft (two-by-four-metre) frame behind.

The work had already been sold to a Norwegian buyer at face value.

“The piece was sold for nothing basically. It was just an exchange,” Mr Christensen told the BBC News website.

“I wanted to make a blunt work with the intention of creating a discussion about the value of art, and about capitalism, and how the art world works,” he said.

Mr Christensen said he did not know whether he would make a replacement.

Frame with artwork removed

The artist wanted to create a discussion about the value of art

“We were afraid something like this might happen,” he said.

“I didn’t want to compromise the artwork but I realised it might cause some problems.”

The thieves managed to make off with the money despite security measures being in place when they broke in late on Sunday.

Mr Christensen believes that the presence in Oslo of many high-profile guests for the King of Norway’s birthday celebrations had diverted many of the city’s police from their usual duties.

Despite the double blow of losing an artwork made up of his own money, Mr Christensen says he finds the theft “interesting”.

“It proves my theory that I have made an artwork that has a value outside the gallery space.”

“It means a lot to me that the myth can continue,” he said, referring to the fact that the notes could end up in general circulation.

He said he found it puzzling that someone might wish to risk jail for relatively small amount of money, and is unsure as to what type of person would have stolen his art.

“It could be a drug user, but at least it’s one who’s interested in art,” he said.