TOP V. WEEKEND PICKS (1/19-1/25)

January 19, 2017 · Print This Article

“A distinctive feature of the exhibition is the artist’s transposition of two-tone color palettes, often used in the interiors of institutional spaces, onto the gallery walls. Social hygiene movements and hospital reforms at the turn of the 20th century inform the artist’s selection of colors as well as the work of Chicago-born color consultant and color theorist Faber Birren. A student in the College at UChicago in the early 1920’s, Birren later established a consulting company, advising on the use of color in industry and the workplace. Drawing from color design studies by Faber Birren and Company held at the University of Chicago’s Special Collections Library, Kiwanga thereby recalls the application of color theory to the conditions of work, learning, surveillance, healing, and care. ”

-Yesomi Umolu, Exhibition Curator Logan Center

 

1. The sum and its parts


January 20, 2017, 6-8PM
Work by: Kapwani Kiwanga (Curated by Yesomi Umolu)
Logan Center Exhibitions: 915 E 60th St, Chicago, IL 60637

 

2. Kjell Theøry: Prologue


January 20, 2017, 5:30-7PM
Work by: Anatomical Theaters of Mixed Reality (ATOM-r): Mark Jeffery (choreography), Judd Morrissey (text and technology), Justin Deschamps and Christopher Knowlton (collaborators/performers); and collaborations by: Grace DuVal (costumes); Elena Ailes, Claire Ashley, Bryan Saner, Laura Prieto-Velasco, Stephen Reynolds, and Oli Watt (objects); Leonardo Kaplan (performance), Mev Luna (research assistant), Joshua Patterson (sound)
International Museum of Surgical Science: 1524 N Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, IL 60610

 

3. Dark Light


January 21, 2017, 1-3PM
Work by: Nadia Hironaka and Matthew Suib
Cleve Carney Art Gallery: 425 Fawell Blvd, Glen Ellyn, IL 60137

 

4. Social Choreography and Performing the Self


January 23, 2017, 7-9PM
Lecture by: Bojana Cvejic
Sector 2337 + Green Lantern Press: 2337 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, IL 60647

 

5.  Chicago on My Mind


January 20, 2017, 6-8PM
Work by: Hebru Brantley, Shani Crowe, Stephen Flemister, Lamont Hamilton, Dayo Laoye, Harold Mendez, Melissa Potter, and Kara Walker (Curated by La Keisha Leek and Sadie Woods)
Arts and Public Life: 301 E Garfield Blvd, Chicago, IL 60637

 

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Episode 316: Maud Lavin

September 20, 2011 · Print This Article

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This week: We talk to Maud Lavin about her most recent book and more!

Lifted from elsewhere:

 

In the past, more often than not, aggressive women have been rebuked, told to keep a lid on, turn the other cheek, get over it. Repression more than aggression was seen as woman’s domain. But recently there’s been a noticeable cultural shift. With growing frequency, women’s aggression is now celebrated in contemporary culture—in movies and TV, online ventures, and art. In Push Comes to Shove, Maud Lavin examines these new images of aggressive women and how they affect women’s lives.

Aggression, says Lavin, is necessary, large, messy, psychological, and physical. Aggression need not entail causing harm to another; we can think of it as the use of force to create change—fruitful, destructive, or both. And over the past twenty years, contemporary culture has shown women seizing this power. Lavin chooses provocative examples to explore the complexity of aggression: the surfer girls in Blue Crush; Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect; the homicidal women in Kill Bill and artist Marlene McCarty’s mural-sized Murder Girls; the erotica of Zane and the art of Kara Walker; the group dynamics of artists (including the artists group Toxic Titties) and activists; and YouTube videos of a woman boxer training and fighting.

Women need aggression and need to use it consciously, Lavin writes. With Push Comes to Shove, she explores the crucial questions of how to manifest aggression, how to represent it, and how to keep open a cultural space for it.




Tuesday’s Video Pick | Kara Walker

September 1, 2009 · Print This Article

In this week’s pick we check out Kara Walker discussing her piece Fibbergibbet and Mumbo Jumbo: Kara E. Walker in Two Acts created at Fabric Workshop in 2004. The installation consists of one of Walker’s first videos. In this video she discusses the move from flat works to installations and incorporating a moving image.

via The Fabric Workshop

“The installation consists of a theatrical stage set made of a cloth backdrop on which a landscape has been painted in washes of coffee and pigment. Before the backdrop stands the painted wooden silhouettes of willow trees and a signpost, which bears a series of aphorisms which are either misleading, or dead ends in their own right. From behind the backdrop, a fiery light casts the shadows of Walker’s characters against the painted landscape as her narrative unfolds beneath a spirited moon.”

For more on this video please check out Fabric Workshop’s site.




Kara Walker speaks at University of Chicago Tonight

May 13, 2009 · Print This Article

Kara Walker, "African American," 1998

Kara Walker, “African American,” 1998

As part of the University of Chicago’s Artspeaks program, Kara Walker will talk with associate professor of history Amy Dru Stanley. Click the link above for full details; tickets are $20 to general public, $5 to students with i.d.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 | 7:30 pm
Kent Hall, Room 107
University of Chicago
1020 E. 58th Street
View map

From the University’s website:

“Walker will reflect on her work in a presentation and dialogue with Amy Dru Stanley, Associate Professor, Department of History, who’s research and teaching focus on capitalism, slavery and emancipation, and the historical experience of moral problems.

Known for exploring the raw intersection of race, gender and sexuality, Kara Walker unleashes the traditionally proper Victorian medium of the silhouetted figure. Her installations create a theatrical space in which her unruly cut-paper characters fornicate and inflict violent acts upon one another. With one foot in the historical realism of slavery and the other in the fantastical space of the romance novel, Walker’s nightmarish fictions simultaneously seduce and implicate its audience. A 1997 recipient of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Achievement Award and a 2008 United States Artists Fellow, Kara Walker’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Walker lives in New York where she is on the faculty of the MFA program at Columbia University.”