Episode 512: Kochi-Muziris Biennale

June 26, 2015 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download
back bone art work by Shantamani Muddaiah kochi - muziris biennale 2014
On December 12, 2014, the Second Kochi-Muziris Biennale, curated by artist Jitish Kallat, opened in Kerala, India. The second edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale built upon the themes from the first Kochi-Muziris Biennale. So, before we dive into the second edition, let’s first revisit Indian’s inaugural international Biennale.

The first edition opened on December 12, 2012. It was a huge event and by all accounts, a success. In this podcast, Tanya Gill puts together a collection of artist interviews and viewer reactions from the first Biennale’s opening week in 2012, including celebrated artists Nalini Malani, Vivan Sundaram, Tallur L.N., Rohini Devasher, as well as Australian street artists Daniel Connell and Vextra, independent curator Amit Kumar Jain, and filmmaker Hatti Bowering.

Please stay tuned for the forthcoming second Kochi-Muziris Biennale podcast. This podcast, as well as photographs of the

and additional interviews, can be found at zacii.com. Additional information on the Kochi-Muziris Biennale can be found at http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org.

Tanya Gill is a visual artist who lives between Chicago, USA and Chandigarh, India.

A special thank you to everyone who took the time to talk in December 2012! It was amazing to witness this groundbreaking event.




Episode 261: Jitish Kallat

August 29, 2010 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download

This Week: Our sixth season kicks off with a great interview with artist Jitish Kallat. We talk about his work, his installation at the Art Institute, and what it is like to live and work in an art scene in a city with 14 million people. If that weren’t enough, curator Dr. Madhuvanti Ghose chimes in as well!

The following shameless lifted from the AIC web site:

Public Notice 3

September 11, 2010–January 2, 2011

Grand Staircase

Overview: In the first major presentation in an American museum of Jitish Kallat’s work, the contemporary Indian artist has designed a site-specific installation that connects two key historical moments—the First World Parliament of Religions held on September 11, 1893, and the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on that very date, 108 years later. The resulting work, Public Notice 3, creates a trenchant commentary on the evolution, or devolution, of religious tolerance across the 20th and 21st centuries.

The basis for Kallat’s installation is a landmark speech delivered by Swami Vivekananda at the Parliament, which was held in conjunction with the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in what is now the museum’s Fullerton Hall. The Parliament was the earliest attempt to create a global dialogue of religious faiths, and Vivekananda, eloquently addressing its 7,000 attendees, argued for an end of fanaticism and a respectful recognition of all traditions of belief through universal tolerance.

With Public Notice 3, Kallat converts Vivekananda’s text to LED displays on each of the 118 risers of the historic Woman’s Board Grand Staircase of the Art Institute of Chicago, adjacent to the site of Vivekananda’s original address. Drawing attention to the great chasm between this speech of tolerance and the very different events of September 11, 2001, the text of the speech will be displayed in the colors of the United States’ Department of Homeland Security alert system. Opening on September 11, Public Notice 3 explores the possibility of revisiting the historical speech as a site of contemplation, symbolically refracting it with threat codes devised by a government to deal with this terror-infected era of religious factionalism and fanaticism.

Curator: Dr. Madhuvanti Ghose, Marilynn Alsdorf Curator of Indian and Islamic Art.