New “Centerfield” Post on art:21 blog | Protest Songs and Lullabies: Susan Philipsz in Chicago

March 29, 2011 · Print This Article

Our latest “Centerfield” post is up on Art:21 blog today. This time, I write about the multiple presentations of Susan Philipsz’ works on view right now in Chicago at the MCA and the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum. An excerpt from the piece follows; click on over to read it in full.

…My husband and I realize that it’s kind of weird to sing our kid to sleep with a song about men dying of silicosis, but then again the lyrics to “Rock-a-Bye Baby” are pretty disturbing too. Still, the question of why someone would sing a protest song as if it were a lullaby was very much on my mind during several recent encounters with the work of Scottish artist Susan Philipsz. She has three installations on view right now in Chicago: We Shall Be All and Internationale at the Museum of Contemporary Art and Pledge at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum on the University of Illinois, Chicago campus. The winner of this year’s Turner Prize, Philipsz is widely acclaimed for her use of sound — and more specifically of voice — in works of art that engage the history and culture of protest. Almost all of Philipsz’s installations rely on her own, untrained vocals to weave densely allusive tapestries that commemorate the experiences of those struggling for a better world — something we don’t normally associate with the soothing nature of lullabies.

Commissioned by the MCA, Phillipsz’s We Shall Be All references Chicago’s labor movement and its legacy of social reform in the context of worldwide struggles for worker’s rights. I think it’s partly the fact that public-sector labor unions are so much in the news nowadays, due to the efforts of numerous GOP legislators to quash the collective bargaining power of those unions (or even its mere visual representation) that lends such a sharp sting to Philipsz’s Chicago presentations. Consisting of several speakers and a projection screen arranged within a completely darkened room, We Shall Be All takes its title from Melvyn Dubofsky’s We Shall Be All: A History of the Industrial Workers of the World. This book provides the definitive history of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), the Chicago-born labor association whose influence was especially strong during the years before World War I. In particular, Philipsz’s piece alludes to the 1886 Haymarket Massacre in Chicago, whose anniversary is commemorated on May 1st of each year in honor of International Workers Rights.

(Read more).

 




Top 5 Weekend Picks! ( 5/14-5/15)

May 14, 2010 · Print This Article

1. Whim Jobs at WELIVEINNY$LA

Work by Ellen Nielsen.

WELIVEINNY$LA  is located at 1801 S Peoria St. Reception Friday, 7-10pm. Show runs 5/14-6/4.

2. After Eggleston at Black Market

Work by Yvette Marie Dostatni and Alexandra Dietz.

Black Market is located at 1026 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday, 6-9pm. Show runs 5/14-5/31.

3. Messing With Jane: Excavating History at Hull-House at Jane Addams Hull-House Museum

Organized by Professor Rebecca Keller and including the work of Liene Bosque-Muller, Chiara Galimberti, Elise Goldstein, Maral Hashemi, Rebecca Hernandez, Allison Jenetopulos, Sarah Legow, Erin Obradovich, Hannah Merry Shaw and Cori Williams.

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum is located at 800 S. Halsted St. Reception Friday, 5-7pm. Show runs 5/14-5/21.

4. Live Forever at Concertina Gallery

Work by Marty Burns, Dave Dyment, Elise Goldstein, Megan Hildebrandt,
Jason Lazarus, Tibi Tibi Neuspiel, and Ruben Nusz. The final show at Concertina.

Concertina Gallery is located at 2351 N. Milwaukee Ave., 2nd fl. Reception Saturday 7-10pm. Show runs 5/15-5/26.

5. Steve Reinke at Roots & Culture

A screening of works by Steve Reinke.

Roots & Culture is located at 1034 N Milwaukee Ave. Screenings run from Saturday at 8pm to Sunday at 10pm.