Museum Exhibitions and The Book

November 23, 2009 · Print This Article

51Dsc65rx7L._SS500_I’m fascinated (alas, only from afar) by the Louvre’s Special Guest program and in particular with its use of acclaimed novelists as guest curators. (I’ve posted on this program before, here). The Louvre has featured Toni Morrison in this capacity in the past; right now, the novelist and semiotician Umberto Eco is unveiling a series of exhibitions and other programs relating to the topic of “The Infinity of Lists” which draws upon his book The Vertigo of the List. This, along with an email from one of our readers (hi Elizabeth!), has got me thinking about the relationship between books and museum exhibitions – and in particular about what happens when novels are the inspiration for museum exhibitions – or even for museums themselves. Read more




Museum in a Shoebox

June 29, 2009 · Print This Article

Polaroids from the Sky

Polaroids from the Sky at The Museum in a Shoebox

If you’re a fan of The Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles, you should definitely visit the website for the Museum in a Shoebox.

Located at 15 Old Street in Old Town, the Museum in a Shoebox currently features Polaroids from the Sky: Clouds through the Ages, described as a major exhibition presenting the science and history of the skies. From the Museum’s website:

“The exhibition also shows how skies have been depicted in art and literature. There are a lot of old paintings with golden frames on display. For over a year, the Museum has collected random polaroids picturing the sky. So far, the collection consists of more than 16 000 polaroids, which are all on display in the great exhibition hall.”

Concurrently, the Museum is presenting Cardboard Seasons by Japanese animation artist Satoshi Nakashima, who creates two dimensional landscapes out of discarded cardboard. Prior to this, the Museum featured the popup architectural miniatures of artist Johanna Bruce.

Founded/created by the Swedish architect and artist Kristina Dalberg, the Museum in a Shoebox, its website notes, “is a museum of contemporary art, architecture and design. It presents both real and imaginary works by real and imaginary artists, thus blurring the line between fact and fiction.”

Indeed, the Shoebox is just like most other museums–better, even. Designed by architect Aleksandr Kuznetsov (see what you come up with when you Google his name), the Museum has a gift shop, a restaurant, a large exhibition space and the gallery in a shoebox (a “smaller gallery for small exhibitions”) plus a theater, a library, an auditorium and 10 seminar rooms.

The Museum in a Shoebox had its grand opening last month, with 5000 people in attendance. Cupcakes were served.

You can also check out the Museum in Shoebox on Facebook here. (Via Dezeen).

Guided tours offered in 53 different languages (including Esperanto)

Guided tours offered in 53 different languages (including Esperanto)

the Museum's Summer Pavillion

Enjoy the Museum's Summer Pavilion

shots from the Gala Opening

Festive shots from the Museum's Gala Opening

Cardboard Seasons

Cardboard Seasons on display at the Museum in a Shoebox