Friday Clips 4/10/09

April 10, 2009 · Print This Article

A subjective round-up of the week’s art-world events, news stories, blog links and other happenings in Chicago and beyond that are of note or otherwise got me thinkin’.

*Deathtoll of L’Aquila earthquake in Italy is at 189; the earthquake injured over 1,000 and left thousands more homeless; extensive damage to architectural monuments and artworks in the area deal a severe blow to Italy’s cultural heritage.

*Salander Gallery Director Steven Harvey pleads guilty to falsifying records (via ArtsJournal).

*Robert Delford Brown, performance artist and founder of The First National Church of the Exquisite Panic has died at the age of 78. (New York Times).

*Museum ethics smackdown: Donn Zaretsky’s “What’s Wrong with the AAMD’s Deaccessioning Policy” vs. Christopher Knight’s “What’s Wrong with the Argument Attacking AAMD Policy.” Go Christopher!

*Mies’ Test Cell aka The Gunnery aka The Watchtower: whatever you call it, the Metra wants to tear it down. Edward Lifson tells us why we shouldn’t.

*Economy hurting museum but attendance is up; Museums Do More With Less (Chicago Tribune).

*The Geography of Buzz. (New York Times).

*“I’ve Seen the Future, and It Belongs to the Dead”: Edward Winkleman on whether deceased artists can bring the art market back to life.

*Getty Research Institute Acquires Guerrilla Girl Archives (Culture Monster).

*Ball-Nogues Studio (based in L.A.’s Echo Park) to design Elastic Plastic Sponge for Coachella this year.  It’s a 250 x 25 foot sculpture made of plastic tubing that will mist water on overheated festival-goers, made in collaboration with students at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (Sci Arc). (via Culture Monster).

*Attention all K-12 art and media educators in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles: applications for Art21′s Art Educators 2009/10, “a yearlong professional development initiative designed to cultivate and support K-12 art educators interested in bringing contemporary art, artists, and themes into their classrooms,” are available now.