Jeffrey Deitch and Carlo McCormick at apexart tonight

April 8, 2010 · Print This Article

In conjunction with the exhibition Don’t Piss on Me and Tell Me it’s Raining apexart presents a conversation between Jeffrey Deitch and Carlo McCormick. On the eve of Mr. Deitch’s departure from New York, he’ll discuss his time and legacy as “one of the most visible, dynamic and controversial players in the New York art world.” Full details on the talk below, straight from the source. Keep your eyes on our website for the broadcast of this conversation on an upcoming episode of Bad at Sports’ podcast.

Carlo McCormick is a leading New York art writer and a champion of “the downtown scene.” He is the author of numerous books, monographs and catalogues on contemporary art and artists, and has lectured and taught extensively at universities and colleges around the United States. His writing has appeared in Aperture, Art in America, Art News, Artforum, Camera Austria, High Times, Spin, Tokion, Vice and countless other magazines. He has curated shows for the Bronx Museum of Art, New York University, the Queens Museum of Art and the Woodstock Center for Photography. McCormick is Senior Editor of PAPER magazine.

Jeffrey Deitch has been a paragon of taste and a fierce proponent of contemporary art and its emergence both in New York City and the world at large. Deitch is a dealer in modern and contemporary art and an art advisor to private and institutional art collectors. He is also an art writer and exhibition organizer, having contributed to Arts, Art in America, Artforum, and numerous other publications, and served as the first American Editor of Flash Art. He received an Art Critic’s Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1979. Deitch’s first important curatorial project was Lives, a 1975 exhibition about artists who used their own lives as an art medium. It was presented in a vacant office building in Tribeca. His most ambitious exhibition was Post Human, which opened at the FAE Musée d’Art Contemporain in Lausanne in June 1992, and travelled to the Castello di Rivoli in Torino, the Deste Foundation in Athens, the Deichtorhallen in Hamburg, and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Prior to opening his own art advisory firm in 1988, Mr. Deitch was a Vice President of Citibank where he spent nine years developing and managing the bank’s art advisory and art finance businesses. Before joining Citibank, he was the Assistant Director of the John Weber Gallery in New York and then the Curator of the De Cordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts. After a long career in New York, he will start as Director of the Los Angeles MOCA in June 2010.

Please join us.

All events are free and open to the public.
apexart‘s exhibitions and public programs are supported in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Edith C. Blum Foundation, Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, The Greenwich Collection Ltd., The William Talbott Hillman Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts.

apexart
291 Church Street, NYC, 10013
t. 212 431 5270
www.apexart.org




Don’t Piss On Me and Tell Me It’s Raining Opens at apexart Tonight!

April 7, 2010 · Print This Article

The time has finally come: Don’t Piss on Me and Tell Me It’s Raining, aka Bad at Sports’ exhibition at apexart in New York, opens tonight! Everyone is thrilled and excited and truly grateful to the wonderful folks at apex art for giving us this fantastic opportunity. So if you’re in New York city tonight, be sure and swing by the opening from 6-8pm to meet Richard, Duncan, Tom, Amanda, Meg and other fabulous people who will be in attendance. Full details on the show were posted on the blog earlier this week. A few pics from the installation follow, and make sure to track the hilarious antics of the Bad at Sports crew today and tonight by following the hashtag #basapex on Twitter.

And for those of you not able to take a NY trip this time round, lucky for you (and me), all of the public talks will be recorded and broadcast on upcoming episodes of the podcast so you won’t miss a word. Next week on the blog, Meg will have a big New York city wrap-up  with installation pics, reviews, notes and other fun stuff, and we’ll post highlight pictures of the exhibition as they come in and/or if anyone remembers to send them to me. Congratulations everyone!!

Incubate's submission to the Bad at Sports archive

A chunk of The Suburban, now part of the B@S archives.




Bad at Sports Exhibition at Apexart!

February 17, 2010 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports is coming to apexart in New York, and we’re all giggling with excitement like a pack of schoolgirls. As a collective we are organizing a star-studded exhibition that will run from April 7 – March 22nd and we want you to be there and make your presence known! More advance intel to come via the podcast and here on the blog, of course, but we wanted to start banging the drums and lighting the homefires and whatever the hell else one does to get people all rowdy and enthusiastic about what’s to come.

The exhibition is titled Don’t Piss On Me And Tell Me It’s Raining, but feel free to call it the Bad at Sports show. It’ll be like the podcast, but in three dimensions (or wait, isn’t sound already three dimensions?? This is why I failed that Physics of Music class). There will be tons of works submitted by former guests of the show on view, free giveaways, a special talkback section (more info on this soon) and weekly live events of the conversational sort. Don’t expect any slabs of honey-drizzled meat, golden cakes, or chocolate Koons sculptures at said happenings, but maybe there will be beer?

Here are the deets, hot off the keyboard – stay tuned for info on specific events as they are finalized.

“Part archive, part arts journalism, part in-depth conversation and part record-breaking run-on sentence: the Chicago-based collective Bad at Sports is many things at once, but it is first and foremost a collaboration between artists and their communities. Don’t Piss On Me And Tell Me It’s Raining provides a visual counterpart to the extensive audio archive that Bad at Sports has amassed over the past five years and 300+ hours of its weekly podcast. Hundreds of small-scale drawings, texts, and other physical objects made specifically for this exhibition will be on view, each piece produced by the artists and other cultural figures who have appeared on the show over the past five years. Numerous live interviews, panel discussions and performances, many of which will be recorded for future broadcasts, will also take place in the gallery on a twice-weekly basis. In addition, a special “talkback” section of the exhibition asks viewers to direct their own questions to art world personages, thereby enabling audiences to take part in the sprawling, provocative, irreverent and timely conversation that is Bad at Sports.”