Top 5 Weekend Picks (1/7-1/9)

January 7, 2011 · Print This Article

Sorry I’ve missed you all over the Christmas and New Year holiday, I was gallivanting about in California. Now I’m back, and looking forward to another great year of Chicago art.

-Steph

1. Mars: Adrift on the Hourglass Sea at Carl Hammer Gallery

Work by Nicholas Kahn and Richard Selesnick.

Carl Hammer Gallery is located at 740 N. Wells St. Reception is Friday from 5:30-8pm.

2. The Collective at David Weinberg Gallery

Work by Eric Blum, David Burdeny, Helen Maureen Cooper, Jordan Eagles, Bob Emser, Amanda Friedman, Joseph Ivacic, Yvette Kaiser-Smith, Beverly Kedzior, Daniel Kim, Kelly McCormick, Robert McGuire, Jennifer Scott McLaughlin, Elizabeth Opalenik, Michael Parker, Michael Ratulowski, Tricia Rumbolz, Stephanie Serpick, Dylan Vitone, David Weinberg, and Rhonda Wheatley. This is the final show at Weinberg Gallery.

David Weinberg Gallery is located at 300 W. Superior St., #203. Reception is Friday from 5-8pm.

3. Mostly Small and Serious at Stephen Daiter Gallery

Work by Elliott Erwitt.

Stephen Daiter Gallery is located at 230 W. Superior. Reception is Friday from 5-8pm.

4. Cryptogram, So Alone and Mystified, & You’re Partially to Blame at Packer Schopf Gallery

Work by Deborah Baker, Michael Krueger, and Dominic Paul Moore, respectively.

Packer Schopf Gallery is located at 942 W. Lake St. Reception is Friday from 5-8pm.

5. Thing is a Hole in a Thing It is Not at The Renaissance Society

Work by Gerard Byrne.

The Renaissance Society is located at 5811 S. Ellis Ave., Cobb Hall 418. Reception is Sunday from 4-7pm, with and artist talk from 5-6pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (11/5 & 11/6)

November 5, 2010 · Print This Article

1. Territorial Markers at Fill in the Blank Gallery -

Work by Mark Porter

Fill in the Blank Gallery is located at 5038 N. Lincoln Ave. Reception is Friday (tonight) from 7-11pm.

2. Jordan Eagles at David Weinberg Gallery -

Blood paintings. Also featuring the work of Dylan Vitone

David Weinberg Gallery – 300 W. Superior St., #203. Reception is Friday (tonight) from 5-8pm.

3. Culture & the Body at Schneider Gallery -

Work by Liu Bolin, Victor Vasquez, Magdalena Campos-Pons, and Ian van Coller.

Schneider Gallery is located at 230 W. Superior St. Reception is Friday (tonight) from 5-7:30pm.

4. Michael Rea: New Work at ebersmoore -

New works by Chicago’s master of bad-ass wooden thingies!

ebersmoore is located at 213 N Morgan St, 3C. Reception is Friday (tonight) from 6-9pm.

5. Maria Jönsson and Greg Stimac at New Capital -

The title says it all. Couldn’t find their website, so thanks to On The Make for the listing!

New Capital is located at 3114 W Carroll Ave. Reception is Saturday from 7-10pm.




David Weinberg Gallery Closing.

September 7, 2010 · Print This Article

File under: Huge Bummer. Via an email from Richard Holland titled “Another One Bites the Dust,” I just got word that as of March 11, 2011, David Weinberg Gallery will close its doors.

Farewell to this stellar contemporary art gallery, which has had a four-year run of top-notch programming. No word yet on why the space is closing (though one always assumes that the economic climate must be a major factor), or what the future holds for its talented staff.

The press release announcing the gallery’s forthcoming closure follows. Go out and show your love for this space by attending the opening for David Burdeny’s show (which looks frakkin’ amazing) this Friday evening!

As of March 1, 2011, the David Weinberg Gallery will cease operations as a contemporary art gallery and transition to a business office and showroom space focusing on the fine art photographic works of David Weinberg. Until that time the gallery will continue with its scheduled shows, including: a solo show featuring the photographic works of David Burdeny from September 10 – October 30, 2010; a concurrent group show featuring nine young artists from the 2010 MFA photography program at the Yale University School of Art; a show featuring the paintings of Jordan Eagles and the photographic works of Dylan Vitone from November 5 – December 30, 2010 in conjunction with the Chicago Humanities Festival; and finally, a group show featuring selected works from our acclaimed stable of artists from January 7 – February 26, 2011.

The past four years have offered opportunities to work with a talented group of artists, the reward of which is impossible to describe. We have been honored to host 30 exhibitions featuring five Guggenheim winners and two MacAurthur Fellows alongside our distinguished group of emerging artists from Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. We have been privileged to collaborate with such prestigious institutions as the Field Museum, the School of the Art Institute, the Yale University School of Art, the Chicago Humanities Festival and Marwen, to name just a few. Each of our artists offered their unique creative efforts to help make the David Weinberg Gallery a trusted and honored destination within the contemporary art scene in Chicago.

The David Weinberg Gallery has also been a pioneering force for arts education with our unique approach towards free and regular educational programming within our gallery setting. Dedicated to serving as an exceptional learning environment for elementary through college level students, the Gallery has offered opportunities to allow and foster access and understanding of the larger arts community in Chicago. In addition, we have partnered with collegiate and community institutions, including many not-for-profits, to collaborate on programs that have included lectures, workshops, professional development, and collection management. The gallery will continue to offer free education programming until the transition occurs in 2011. In addition, David Weinberg will continue his commitment to education privately through his involvement with the Illinois Network of Charter Schools (INCS) and the Marwen Foundation.

We have been profoundly honored to share our passion with you and our local arts community. Thank you.

We hope you will join us this Friday for the opening of our 3rd to last show – David Burdeny.

David Burdeny, Dubai I, Persian Gulf, UAE. C-Print.




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (2/26 & 2/27)

February 24, 2010 · Print This Article

1. Pamela Fraser at Golden Gallery

Golden Gallery, generally a crowd pleaser, is putting up another strong show. This round it consists of works on paper by artist Pamela Fraser. The works (from what I could find and discern) are all abstract, hyper-color pieces. Is “eye candy” a bad word in the art world?

Golden Gallery is located at 816 W. Newport Ave. Opening reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

2. Alumni at David Weinberg Gallery

I went to SAIC for grad school, but I don’t believe that gives me a complete bias for SAIC grad work. However, when I see good work from my fellow alums, I got to give it a shout.  David Weinburg is putting on an exhibition of “recent” SAIC grad work, including that of Amy Mayfiled, Noelle Allen, Helen Maurene Cooper, & Michael Ratulowski. If you haven’t seen their work yet (which, if you’ve been in Chicago a while, is unlikely) make sure you stop by. If you already know their work, head over for a refresher on why they’re awesome.

David Weinberg Gallery  is located at 300 W. Superior St. Opening reception is Friday from 5-8pm. Read more




Richard Hunt at G.R. N’Namdi Gallery

June 1, 2009 · Print This Article

Richard Hunt, Model for Tower of Aspiration, N'Namdi Gallery

Richard Hunt, Model for Tower of Aspiration, N'Namdi Gallery

Richard Hunt’s terrific sculpture show at David Weinberg Gallery closed last weekend, but if you missed it there’s another powerful selection of Hunt’s work from the past 20 years on view at G.R. N’Namdi Gallery.

David Weinberg’s space, the smaller of the two galleries, showed off the many paradoxical elements of Hunt’s sculptures in a surprisingly effective manner. When I first walked in to that exhibition, the room felt overly crowded to the extent that I feared one of sculptures’ edges might actually jab me (or I it). But it quickly became clear that, physically at least, there was plenty of room for all of us.

Richard Hunt, Low Flight, welded stainless steel. David Weinberg Gallery

Richard Hunt, Low Flight, welded stainless steel. David Weinberg Gallery

Hunt’s work is full of surprises like that. Eluding easy formal classifications, his sculptures can’t adequately be described as organic, nor are they exactly technological in nature. They’re somewhere in between the two, where spiraling forms evoke the flow of waves or the whir of circular blades. One sculpture at N’Namdi recalls a stack of bones, human and otherwise; others have sharp, protruding hooks.  The lines of Hunt’s sculptures alternate between curving and jagged, their movement sometimes vertical, sometimes lateral, but always, always upwards.

picture-121

Stacks of things frequently rest atop stacks of other things, as if someone were trying to build a stairway to heaven by piling object upon object as high as the whole thing will go–an implausible and impossibly graceful agglomeration of broken wings, torn dorsal fins, discarded hand tools and shards of bone.

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Hunt’s sculptures may reach upwards, but they’re far from dreamy. The often rapid transitions from one form to another doesn’t suggest rebirth or regeneration so much as an effort to fit together, sometimes clumsily, that which already exists. In this Hunt’s forms evoke the forward movement of history (be it an individual’s or a nation’s) as something precariously and pragmatically achieved, in fits and starts, over time.

Richard Hunt, Incline with Rising Curve. David Weinberg Gallery

Richard Hunt, Incline with Rising Curve. David Weinberg Gallery

The show is at G.R. N’Namdi Gallery (110 N. Peoria, Chicago, 312-563-9240) through June 30th.