Not Giving a F*ck with Conrad Freiburg

May 16, 2014 · Print This Article

Guest post by Jacob Wick

I met artist and musician Conrad Freiburg at his home/studio south of downtown Los Angeles with a mostly-full bottle of Malort in tow. I’d met him before, several times. The first time was at 8550 Ohio (née Harold Arts), probably in 2010 or 2011. The summer I moved from the east coast to the west one, I listened repeatedly to his album the Undecagon, which at the time I thought was a very poetic name about the mystery of geometry. I continued to think this until the night of this interview, when I discovered that an undecagon is any 11-sided polygon. I’m looking forward to seeing him play live, for the first time, on May 17th, in the lot outside of his home/studio, south of downtown LA. I left the bottle of Malort there—it’s really terrible stuff—and I’m looking forward to reuniting with it. Anyway, I went to his studio with the intention of talking about a sign he had told me about a month earlier, which, when I arrived, it became apparent that he had not yet made. Then again…

Welcome to not giving a fuck

Napkin sketch for not giving a fuck

JW: It’s all the same. I could look at these sketches and say like wow, this sign is beautiful, I love the way the wood grain…you know? I’d say it’s about six feet high by about eight feet wide, just like, uh, think about it.

CF: If you can imagine a national park sign that says “Welcome to not giving a fuck,” that’s the idea. It’s got the handyman/weekend-warrior font, you know? The top of the sign has a little bit of a slope to it, and all the corners are rounded. And, you know, it says: “Welcome to not giving a fuck.” Which I think is very important to getting anywhere worthwhile. There’s some element of forgetting to give a fuck.

JW: Like unintentionally not giving a fuck? Where you suddenly start not giving a fuck but don’t realize it?

CF: Unintentionally not giving a fuck. Maybe you stick your tongue out when you focus. You know? Maybe there’s just some sort of weird thing you do…when you’re focused on something, and you’re in there, you don’t give a fuck about your tongue. About looking like a dumbass. I mean, I speak really because when I really concentrate on something I stick my tongue out.

JW: I cock my head I think. It’s confusing sometimes because I don’t know what to give a fuck about and what not to give a fuck about. I really give a fuck about—like, to get really heavy—I really give a fuck about art. But I don’t give a fuck about art. What am I supposed to do?

CF: Well, art has the advantage of being two things at once.

JW: What’s the two things? Market and culture?

CF: Well, it could be something you both deeply give a fuck about and also think is a silly thing to give a fuck about. I forget where I heard this, some poet or another: it’s as serious as your life. Which seems like an intense statement to make about a music or art. What level of seriousness does it really mean? Like quality or intensity? You can find the intensity that you’re looking for in certain types of art or music, or you can find the calm or whatever zone. The subjective viewpoint is always part of the viewing experience.

JW: Like you’re viewing it from the point of view of your own situation, and your history.

CF: And whether or not you care to give a fuck.

JW: Memorial Day is coming up.

CF: Yeah. I always remember it was very shocking to see my dad wearing jeans, because he just looked so weird wearing jeans to me. He always wore business attire: slacks, maybe even a suit. So when he was on vacation he would wear weird jeans—he would just look so silly in jeans.

JW: He was a salesman?

CF: Yeah, insurance salesman. His phrase, which I think is great, describing what insurance is: you’re replacing an unknown with a known monthly payment.

JW: Like, “I don’t know when I’m going to die, but I know I have a $24.99 monthly payment.”

CF: Somehow making that payment alleviates the stress of whatever it is that is unknown for your car, or your house, or against theft. You can insure against almost anything, it just has to be some unknown thing that could happen and ruin your life. But I’m not an insurance salesman. I got my license to sell life insurance in the State of Illinois, as part of just trying to figure out how to make money while making art…

JW: Did you sell anyone life insurance?

CF: Hell no. Who’s gonna go to an artist or musician to think about organizing their life and getting their shit together? They’re not going to look to me.

JW: But I feel like artists kind of have–especially now—you really have to have your shit together because you have to figure out how you’re going to structure your life so you have time to sit down and make art, or think about art for like a sustained period of time. How many days do you spend, you know, in the studio, so to speak?

CF: Well, I spent about three years. I didn’t take any jobs, I didn’t do anything, I just did art stuff. Recently.

JW: How?

CF: I just kind of thought like what is it that I value? What stage of my career am I in? I need to start making bigger stuff, so I had an opportunity to make some bigger stuff. And my rule for doing art stuff is, “if you want me to do art, you have to provide me the means for providing food and shelter or give me a place to sleep.” I’m not talking about making money off the stuff; I’m talking about sustainable living. I don’t like when people expect art or music to be free. I think it’s disrespectful to people who have dedicated their lives to doing something. If you’re a carpenter and you’ve been doing it for 20 years, you deserve a good rate. If you’re an artist who’s been doing it for 20 or 30 years, you deserve to get some money from your work—or some kind of value. I mean, if you look at art in terms of its monetary value, you miss its whole zone of power. Like with art, you want to make a thing or an experience that gives someone more than they expected. Something that lasts. An idea that sticks in your head, a piece of art that sticks in your head, a performance that sticks in your head. Like the first time I saw David Lynch’s Blue Velvet, when I was a young wisenheimer—I don’t know how young I was, early 20s?—it did not make sense. What does Mulholland Drive mean? I don’t know what it means, but there’s a thing that’s significant about its meaninglessness, or its dreamlike associations. That scene where there’s that opera singer that’s lip-synching her own voice—that just sticks in your head. That disembodied voice that is your own voice. But I feel like that’s a really great entry into how to see art, just get into the mindset of someone who would make such a thing—if you can. There’s these clues that lead nowhere. In a way it keeps you going to back to it because it’s never complete. Like that roller coaster at Linda Warren gallery that I built. I got tired of being in group shows so I just made a piece that wouldn’t play well with others. It just had to be on its own, as a sculpture, nothing else around it. And that was the bowling ball roller coaster. It was called The Slipping Glimpser. There was an association in the research I was doing—which is one of these art tricks, you take a document and translate it into whatever form you work on, like if you’re a theater person you’re going to take MS-DOS catalog and make a play out of it and it’s going to somehow be entertaining. You can take either a totally non-poetic tree catalogue or the biography of an abstract expressionist painter. You can take those two things and use those as your source material for the ups and downs of the rollercoaster.

Slipping Glimpser 2006

The Slipping Glimpser (2006)

JW: Like, this rollercoaster is about Mark Rothko and this rollercoaster is about MS-DOS are both equally believable at a certain point.

CF: Well, let’s face it, abstraction has its advantages. Because you can retroactively or proactively give the thing language that it will be described as, through press releases and artist statements and titles.

JW: You have an album called The Undecagon, you have a bunch of sculptures that you’ve built or are building also called Undecagon…

CF: There’s a whole category of work that’s all undecagon-shaped. The woodshed, which is that big sculpture in Ohio—fully rotational celestrial observatory and musicians’ practice space—

JW: How does it rotate? Does someone have to push it?

CF: Yeah, it’s human-powered. I want to get one of those eccentric wheel-pump type things that you’d see on a train car? Like the old pump-cars on a train? A machine like that that makes it go.

JW: That’d be nice.

CF: Yeah, pretty funny.

JW: Is it on rails?

CF: It’s got kind of like an upside-down tophat shape on the top, and then there’s lateral wheels that pinch it in, so it’s held in the middle and then it rolls along these 8×8 beams that are at the top of these 13-foot posts. So the whole structure pinches in, because the wood expands and contracts and does all this stuff, so when it does that, even if one goes way off, it’s all linked together and it pulls itself tighter. Gravity, over time, tightens everything. There’s a blind dovetail joint in the top of the post that keeps the header and the spoke joist…

JW: I feel like this is the point where carpentry is crossing over into magic for me.

CF: Sure, blind dovetail! It’s a thing you don’t know is there. Unless you really know to look. It’s a little hidden zone, a little further hidden thing in that sculpture. But there’s all kinds of other little fun stuff in there, too. One of things is that over time I’m accumulating this list of local designations for constellations.

JW: Oh really? In Ohio?

CF: Yeah, basically the rule is you have to be able to direct me from the North Star to the constellation. At some time of year. And it makes it on the wall of the upper portion of this rotating deck. So a little inlay, kind of.

JW: So is the idea that people can be practicing in it and people can be on the roof? Or are the people that are practicing intended to be the people who are in the celestial observatory?

CF: Yeah, you probably wouldn’t be practicing and on the roof at the same time, but somebody could be up top listening to you practice. Or you could be up top. When you’re up in the bowl of this thing, you’ll feel closer to the sky. It eliminates the horizon, so when you lay down you can’t see the trees. All you see is just above the wall-structure. So it’s with those kind of sightlines in mind that you just lay down in the thing and get a tour around the stars. It’s a beautiful thing. I feel so lucky to get to make the thing. I’m heading back there this summer to get the final roof on it. Working with some local craftsmen there to get it sealed up properly on the topside. And then really I’m anchored back here. I’m buckling down: I gotta just be here and get things started out here. Which is fun. Being a transplant to California, every day is a new adventure, which is kind of nice. I’m excited. I want to make earthquake powered sculpture. That’s what I want to do. I have specific ideas about how this will happen. I don’t want to say anything more about it, but there’s some urns in the fire. But if anybody has any ideas about land that this thing could happen on, or some sculpture garden or private zone. You want to do our shots of Malort?

[JW & CF down their shots of Malort]

CF: Blech. Dandelion. It makes me think of when I ate a fucking dandelion as a five-year-old on the playground.

JW: God.

CF: That is so disgusting. It’s amazing how disgusting it is! Ugh. Terrible.

JW: But I find it very enjoyable. It’s so bad, but it’s like a thing, there’s nothing else that’s quite like that.

CF: That’s true. It’s utterly distinct.

JW: Do you know about acoustic shit? Is the sculpture in Ohio acoustic? What’s the acoustics in that space?

CF: I would describe it more as aural architecture than acoustic architecture. So aural has a little more cultural connotations and what have you–I’m not making claims of its purity, but the worst kind of room is the one that Human Resources—the cube. Acoustically in there, the way the sound bounces, there’s one tone, there’s gonna be one thing that you hear. You don’t get the broad frequency response because of all the standing waves. Some frequencies cancel. With a structure like the one in Ohio that I’ve built, there’s no parallel surfaces, so the sound scatters…so there’s no standing waves that develop. So the frequency response is all the frequencies sound clear, as opposed to some sounding louder and some sounding softer. In theory. The room itself will have some resonant frequency, just the space of the room itself. The wood, the volume of the air in there is going to have some tone that makes it boom.

JW: Does an 11-sided object reflect sound differently than a circular space would?

CF: There’s lots of corners. As an acoustic musician or any musician setting up to try to project sound to cover up talking or a room or whatever, you have to be in a corner because you’re maximing the acoustic energy, the mphhah. You want to be in a corner if you want to give yourself more noise, or more amplitude. Or if you’re trying to tune while somebody else is playing, you get as close to the corner as possible so you can hear your instrument over the noise. It’s kind of like an acoustical mirror or something.

JW: Yeah, because it’s a reflecting point. Aurally. Is that why you’re so excited about undecagons?

CF: I like the idea of just making irregular objects that have some standard—a standard irregular object. It’s a little wrong. Maybe this thinking of not giving a fuck is also a way of saying to not desire stability. There’s a willingness to be uncomfortable.

JW: Yeah. I’m going to go for this feeling of—this thing that I thought I really cared about, let’s see what happens when I don’t care about it. That kind of thing?

The Woodshed (2013)

The Woodshed (2013) in its natural habitat near Chesterhill, OH

CF: It could be. Yeah, you’re trying on different attitudes regarding the world. I think there’s this thing of unknowns that is important to what I mean. That you only learn from what you don’t know. So if your objective is to learn or to live a good life or something, I think in some way thinking about the good life in the sort-of philosophical way requires that you are part of the world, but also requires that you have something to say, as a friend, to another person. You have to be experienced. You have to be willing to share, and be compassionate, and empathetic, and all these sort of social-type traits. But the thing that keeps me interested, and I think scientists interested, and I think explorers, is the unknown. In a broad cultural way, art is the unknown.

JW: It’s where people go to find what they don’t know.

CF: Or yeah, what doesn’t make sense, or what doesn’t need to make sense. Although I don’t think a lot of people go to museums for that, if they’re going to museums to look at art.

JW: What are they going to museums for?

CF: To impress a date? To see a thing that they remember seeing, back when they were a kid when they smelled the museum for the first time, or they’re just going to be in a quiet place and be with some art objects. I’m thinking of the classical zones, now, the paintings and the furniture and the suits of armor and what-have-you…

JW: But about the readymade zones or the Rauschenberg zones?

CF: It’s hard to describe it. It’s an anecdotal thing. What we’re describing is some newbie to art being frustrated with an art experience that it seems like you have to have a master’s degree to understand it.

JW: But it’s weird because sometimes you do.

CF: Yeah, it turns out that we humans are sophisticated types! And especially artists are complicated people who have to cloak everything in…

JW: Do you think it’s a bad thing?

CF: I don’t think it’s a bad thing. I think there’s advanced levels of thinking in any field. You can see so many dynamics through the knowledge of a thing. Expertise is really—it’s good. That’s how our medical system is set up now: there’s experts. There’s like a generalist who is a fielding agent for the experts.

JW: Your childhood doctor is not going to perform a quadruple bypass on you.

CF: No way! You’re going to want the guy who’s done it three thousand times before. Expertise is what’s gotten into this advanced zone we’re in now, in art. And there are art experts. There is such a thing as expertise. And I think one of things is there’s also a parallel or hierarchical zones, like the community art center show of the tri-county plein air painters is a different places hierarchically in teh art world than the secondary auction market of living artists. It’s an entirely different type of work, entirely different motives behind it, different values ascribed to it, but talking with plein air painters is kind of fun sometimes. You talk about color, you talk—this one woman at a conference I spoke with, she described it so beautifully. She was like I can’t believe I didn’t do this sooner in m life. I see things differently after painting. After looking, and trying to mimic the thing you see with goop. She said, I see things differently. And I was like, that is exactly what art is. On its base level. To see things differently you have to first know that there’s another way of seeing. How do you know?

JW: You have to first know that you see things in the certain way that you see them and not everyone sees them in the exact same way. Which seems pretty basic, but it’s not at all. Separate the world from the earth.

CF: The world from the earth? So the world is cultural, and the earth is material?

JW: I think so. If you ever read The Origin of the Work of Art, by Heidegger—it’s a lecture that he gave, which is really insane because it must have taken an hour and a half and it’s super dense and I can just imagine thirty students in 1934 Germany in a cold room listening to this maniac talk for an hour and a half straight—I feel like that’s a viewpoint from which to approach shit like this—but anyway he’s trying to differentiate like, here’s a lamp and here’s a pen and here’s a painting, and why is the painting art and not the lamp or the pen? So he goes through the lampness of the lamp and what makes the lamp a lamp—like it has this thing that turns it on and off and it has this lightbulb in it and it has a circuit and a function—and the penness of the pen, and then he goes into the art and his conclusion is that what makes a work of art is that it contains within it the potential to make the viewer aware of the differentiation between the world, which is the world as perceived by the viewer, and the earth, which is this deeper zone that the self-perception of the world has come out of.

CF: So there’s like the archetypal things that we share bubbles up in these standard pictures we have. Like the house-image, the tree, the lamp, the pen, the work of art. But this is the thing that I think is important to express to people who feel like they don’t appreciate art, that art is how we know ourselves. That’s what archeologists study. They study paintings on the wall, they study clay pots, they study things that humans made, you know? We look back into paintings and temples and all of these things that teach us about who we are as humans, culturally. If you don’t look at art or understand art you’re not human in some way, you have no access to this part of our existence that defines us.

JW: You define yourself in relief—you become aware that there is an entirely other way that you could be existing in the world. Which is what’s nice about art, what art does.

CF: Yeah, I think so. That’s where the joy of it comes. Instead of thinking about walking, thinking about how you’re really just falling in a controlled way. It’s a mind spot.

Conrad Freiburg is an American artist from the midwestern United States. Starting in the late 90s, his multi-disciplinary projects have engaged audiences with momentary danger, beauty, and lyricism. His work has been reviewed in magazines such as Art Forum, Art Ltd, Art in America, and he was once honored as Chicagoan of the Year by the Chicago Tribune. His work is in many prominent private collections including the MCA in Chicago. Recently, Conrad has completed an eleven-sided fully rotational celestial observatory and musician’s practice space in rural Ohio and continues to tour as a musician offering an improvised approach to composition and song. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Jacob Wick is an artist, writer, and improviser who lives in Los Angeles. In 2013, he coordinated Germantown City Hall, an installation of civic space in a disused structure in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Germantown City Hall was a collaboration with Information Department and the Think Tank that has yet to be named…, and was commissioned by the 2013 Hidden City Festival with generous support from the Andy Warhol Foundation. What We Want is Free: Critical Exchange in Recent Art (2014), for which he was an associate editor, is published by SUNY Press.




Chicago Art in Pictures: Summer of 2013

August 20, 2013 · Print This Article

A graphic, editorial overview of art, artists, and visual art events, found in and around Chicago over the course of the preceding months. All artwork copyright original artists; all photography copyright Paul Germanos.

CourtneyBlades
Mickey Pomfrey & Blake Cameron Harris @ CourtneyBlades
Above: CourtneyBlades’ partners, Mickey Pomfrey, left, and Blake Cameron Harris, right, in the gallery for the opening reception of “Definitely Living, Likely Cognitive,” on August 9, 2013.

Ria Roberts & Matthew Richardson @ CourtneyBlades
Above: “Medium Cool” art book fair organizer Ria Roberts, right, with Matthew Richardson, left, in CourtneyBlades.

Definitely Living, Likely Cognitive @ CourtneyBlades

Mickey Pomfrey is one of a relatively small number of people I encounter on a regular basis at gallery openings in Chicago. In spite of that fact, I’d never before brought a camera to the space (CourtneyBlades) which he runs with Blake Cameron Harris. And it was only because I happened to take photographs there on August 9, 2013, that Ria Roberts noticed me, and reminded me to attend Medium Cool: a new art book fair with which she’s involved.

Bea Fremderman, Brian Khek, and Micah Schippa
“Definitely Living, Likely Cognitive”
August 9 – September 1, 2013
CourtneyBlades
1324 W. Grand Ave.
Chicago, IL 60642
http://courtneyblades.com/

Medium Cool
Tom Burtonwood @ Medium Cool
Above: Tom Burtonwood shares his 3-d printed book–which itself “prints” by means of being folded upon some plastic material.

Yuri Stone / Renaissance Society @ Medium Cool
Above: Yuri Stone for The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Scott Speh / Western Exhibitions @ Medium Cool
Above: Scott Speh of Western Exhibitions.

Ed Panar & Melissa Catanese / Spaces Corners @ Medium Cool
Above: Ed Panar & Melissa Catanese of Spaces Corners.

Vincent Uribe / LVL3 @ Medium Cool
Above: Vincent Uribe feigns interest in my shenanigans while the ladies of LVL3 ignore me. In truth, everyone smiled for the first picture; this was the fifth picture.

Medium Cool
(art book fair)
12:00 — 8:00 PM
August 11, 2013
Prairie Production
1314 W. Randolph St.
Chicago, IL
http://medium-cool.net/

LVL3
Chelsea Culp & Katy Cowan @ LVL3
Above: Chelsea Culp and Katy Cowan.

Matt Nichols & Josue Pellot @ LVL3
Above: Matt Nichols and Josue Pellot.

Whether called collaboration, the pairing of artists or galleries is now at least as common as food trucks outside, or bars within, our local venues.

“2 of a kind”
June 29 – July 21, 2013
LVL3
1542 N. Milwaukee Ave, 3rd Floor
Chicago, Illinois 60622
http://lvl3gallery.com/

The Mission
Yhelena Hall @ The Mission
Above: Yhelena Hall’s upper-gallery installation joining a helium-supported wooden craft with wall-mounted video.

Joshua Albers @ The Mission
Above: Joshua Albers’ lower-gallery (Sub-Mission) projected video installation.

Yhelena Hall’s da Vinci-like creation is built from fabric stretched over a frame, which method of construction reminds a Chicago resident of Linda Warren’s artist Juan Angel Chavez. But, maybe, within Warren’s stable the better comparison is to Conrad Freiburg–for as helium escapes its imperfect balloon, Hall’s wooden machine has a self-destructive potential.

Joshua Albers and Yhelena Hall
PARALLELS / A Collaboration with ACRE Residency, Part 2
August 2 – 24, 2013
The Mission
1431 W. Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60642
http://themissionprojects.com/

Linda Warren Projects
Conrad Freiburg @ Linda Warren Projects
Above: The framing device “Undecagon Tripod,” 2013, at the center of Freiburg’s kinetic, wood installation.

Like Yhelena Hall at The Mission, Conrad Freiburg chose to present freestanding, three-dimensional objects made largely of wood, in the company of smaller, wall-mounted graphic works, which in this case are still images rather than video. Unlike Hall, around the perimeter of gallery interior Freiburg set a race, which in turn carries bearings or marbles as such activity is initiated by visitors. Four years ago, in June of 2009, Monica Herrera arranged a similar work at 65GRAND, there observed with an additional audio component: falling marbles “played” upon successive wooden elements with each drop in elevation.

Conrad Freiburg
“Before the Grave and Constant”
June 7 – August 10, 2013
Linda Warren Projects
327 N. Aberdeen (151)
Chicago, IL 60607
http://lindawarrenprojects.com/

Monica Herrera
Monica Herrera @ 65Grand
Above: A visitor interacts with Monica Herrera’s installation in 2009.

Eliza Fernand, Jodie Mack, Monica Herrera
“post-scarcity”
Curated by Thea Liberty Nichols
65GRAND
June 19 – July 25, 2009
1378 W. Grand Ave. (old location)
Chicago IL 60622-6450

Chicago Artists’ Coalition
Jake Myers @ Chicago Artists’ Coalition
Above: Audience members interact with Jake Myers at his cardboard sports bar.

Mothergirl @ Chicago Artists’ Coalition
Above: Attendees model the available Mothergirl costumes.

Jessica Harvey - Kera MacKenzie - Jenny Buffington @ Chicago Artists’ Coalition
Above, left-to-right: Jessica Harvey, Kera MacKenzie, and Jenny Buffington at the “pARTicipatory” opening on August 9, 2013.

When I hold a camera to my face and look through the viewfinder I’m blind to the room around me, so that it’s especially surprising to be struck at that moment. I write here with authority as I’ve suffered the aforementioned indignity on multiple occasions. On August 9, 2013, for the second time at one of Myers’ openings, someone threw something at me while I was taking a picture. If the games, and food, and liquor, all now frequently available at gallery openings, have served to draw in a certain sort of person then, maybe, they’ve done so only at the cost of another sort of person. After six years of work on this photographic project, my patience has been exhausted.

“pARTicipatory”
HATCH Projects Residents: Chaz Evans, Amber Ginsburg, Mothergirl, Jake Myers, Hoyun Son, and Latham Zearfoss
HATCH Curatorial Residents: Meredith Weber and Anna Trier, a/k/a the Happy Collaborationists
August 9 – August 29, 2013
Chicago Artists’ Coalition
217 N. Carpenter St.
Chicago, IL 60607
http://chicagoartistscoalition.org/

Sonnenzimmer
Sonnenzimmer

Josh Berman @ Sonnenzimmer
Above: Acclaimed coronet player Josh Berman, foreground, nagged by my mother, background. It’s better him than me.

Nick Butcher @ Sonnenzimmer
Above: Nick Butcher, right, gave my mother, left, a Tecate, and she seemed concerned.

Sonnenzimmer print and design studio is Nadine Nakanishi and Nick Butcher. On July 14, 2013, Nick and Nadine held a sort-of art benefit / garage sale, during which Michael Bingaman (electronics), Josh Berman (cornet), Anton Hatwich (double bass), and Matt Schneider (guitar) played music. There, I bought a big Taschen contemporary art compendium for three dollars, and got a Design Bureau magazine for free. Everyone was cool! And John Corbett was there–because he’s really good about attending these things. Even my mother was happy.

“On the patio at Sonnenzimmer”
10:00 AM – 6:00 PM
July 14, 2013
Sonnenzimmer
3605 N. Damen Ave., Rear
Chicago, IL 60618
http://www.sonnenzimmer.com/

Columbia College Chicago: Portfolio Center – Industry Events
Nick Albertson @ Columbia College Industry Events Photography Review
Above: Nick Albertson

Ryan Bringas @ Columbia College Industry Events Photography Review
Above: Ryan Bringas

Meg Noe @ Columbia College Industry Events Photography Review
Above: Meg Noe

Tim M. Johnson @ Columbia College Industry Events Photography Review
Above: Tim M. Johnson

Rikki Levine @ Columbia College Industry Events Photography Review
Above: Rikki Levine

The scale of the event was overwhelming. The quality of almost all of the work was very high. I spent most of my time with those presenters who seemed to have a fine arts orientation. Rikki Levine, above, was something of an exception as she seemed (?) most interested in travel and documentary work. But, her book (portfolio) looked too good to ignore. Whether they knew it, not a few graduates produced material recalling John Opera or Jessica Labatte. And I should have been yet more forceful in my exhortation to go out and look at what’s being made here and now.

Columbia College Chicago
Portfolio Center – Industry Events
“Photography Review”
May 16, 2013
Studio East
1006 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

Allan Sekula
Allan Sekula @ The Renaissance Society
Above: A visitor at the entry to “Polonia and Other Fables” seen engaged with one of Sekula’s photographs during the opening reception in 2009.

Allan Sekula died on August 10, 2013 after a long struggle with cancer.

Allan Sekula
“Polonia and Other Fables”
September 20 – December 13, 2009
The Renaissance Society
5811 S. Ellis Avenue
Bergman Gallery, Cobb Hall 418
Chicago, Illinois 60637
http://renaissancesociety.org/site/

Chicago Art Department
Meg Noe @ Chicago Art Department
Above: “Mr. Grief” by Meg Noe.

“&again&again”
Jeffery Austin, Marne Provost, Kimberly Kim, Meg T. Noe, Jonathan Pivovar, John Brookes Turner
Curated by Jonathan Pivovar
Supported by Columbia College Chicago’s Photography Department
July 12 – 14, 2013
Chicago Art Department
1932 South Halsted #100
Chicago, IL 60608
http://www.chicagoartdepartment.org/

MCA Chicago
Amanda Ross-Ho @ MCA Chicago

The timing of this exhibition is either fortuitous or tragic depending upon one’s knowledge of the not dissimilar installation on Michigan Avenue, and sense of humor.

Amanda Ross-Ho
“THE CHARACTER AND SHAPE OF ILLUMINATED THINGS”
Organized by MCA Curator Julie Rodrigues Widholm.
July – November, 2013
MCA Chicago Plaza Project
The Museum of Contemporary Art of Chicago
220 E. Chicago Ave. (MVDR Drive)
Chicago IL 60611
http://www.mcachicago.org/

Frogman Gallery / Pop-Up Art Loop
Gwendolyn Zabicki @ Frogman Gallery / Pop-Up Art Loop
Above: Dmitry Samarov (painting) at left, curator Gwendolyn Zabicki at center, and Noah Vaughn (photo print) at right, in “Never a lovely so real,” opening night.

The Chicago Loop Alliance deserves credit for the good work it’s done in offering such opportunities to people like Gwendolyn Zabicki.

“Never a lovely so real”
Clarissa Bonet, Dmitry Samarov and Noah Vaughn
Curated by Gwendolyn Zabicki
Pop-Up Art Loop from the Chicago Loop Alliance
Sponsored in part by Columbia College Chicago
July 11, 2013
Frogman Gallery
108 N. State St. (Block Thirty Seven, First Floor)
Chicago, IL 60603
http://gwendolynzabicki.com/home.html

Chicago Artists Coalition
Jordan Martins @ Chicago Artists Coalition
Above: Jordan Martins in his projection, opening night.

Nick Butcher, Jennifer Salim, E. Aaron Ross, Aaron Delehanty @ Chicago Artists Coalition
Above, left-to-right: Nick Butcher (half of Sonnenzimmer), Jennifer Salim, E. Aaron Ross, and Aaron Delehanty standing in a projection by Theodore Darst at the Chicago Artists Coalition’s “Natural Fallacy” opening.

“Natural Fallacy”
Noelle Allen, Theodore Darst, Brent Fogt, Jordan Martins, Nicholas Sagan, and Matthew Schlagbaum
Curated by MK Meador
July 12 – August 1, 2013
Chicago Artists Coalition
217 N. Carpenter St.
Chicago, IL 60607
http://jordanmartins.com/

threewalls
Brenna Murphy & Birch Cooper @ threewalls
Above: MSHR a/k/a Brenna Murphy & Birch Cooper performing an electronic audio work in their installation.

Hear it on Vine: vine.co/v/hamYhHDJJ0d

Abigail Satinsky, Lauren Basing & Shannon Stratton @ threewalls
Above, left-to-right: Abigail Satinsky, Lauren Basing, and Shannon Stratton, a/k/a threewalls, on the occasion of their last opening at 119 N. Peoria Street, Chicago.

Edie Fake @ threewalls
Above: Edie Fake’s installation, with spectators.

Joe Jeffers & Jeremy Tinder @ threewalls
Above: Joe Jeffers, left, and Jeremy Tinder, right, attending the opening.

Thanks to Abigail, Lauren, and Shannon for playing along. I’m sorry that I didn’t get a better shot of you three together. Good luck and best wishes…

“Binary Lore”
Edie Fake and MSHR a/k/a Brenna Murphy & Birch Cooper
June 28, 2013
threewalls
119 N. Peoria, #2C
Chicago, IL 60607
http://www.three-walls.org/

Firecat Projects
Gil Leora @ Firecat Projects

Gil Leora
“In Between Drinks”
June 28, 2013
Firecat Projects
2124 N. Damen Ave.
Chicago, IL 60647
http://www.firecatprojects.org/

Smart Museum
Gigi Scaria @ Smart Museum

It’s too bad that a piece which suggests many questions related to resource allocation within the context of non-European, urban poverty, here found available for view in the lobby of a free, teaching museum, was ignored in an article entitled “Marginalizing Chicagoans’ Access to Culture” at Newcity.

Gigi Scaria
“City Unclaimed”
Sponsored by BMO Harris Bank
January 19 – December 8, 2013
The David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art
5550 S. Greenwood Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637
http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/

EXPO / Public Chicago
Duncan Mackenzie, Caroline Picard, Richard Holland @ EXPO / Public Chicago
Above, left-to-right: Duncan Mackenzie, Caroline Picard, Richard Holland, a/k/a Bad at Sports.

EXPO Chicago
Gallery Announcement
May 14, 2013
Public Chicago
1301 N. State
Chicago, IL 60610
http://expochicago.com/

Johalla Projects
Jessica Taylor Caponigro @ Johalla Projects
Above: Jessica Taylor Caponigro’s “There in a Darkness,” 2013, coal in cast glycerine soap.

Jessica Taylor Caponigro & Aimee Quinkert @ Johalla Projects
Above: Aimee Quinkert, curator, at left, and Jessica Taylor Caponigro, artist, at right, foreground; “What Was, Was I” and “II” on wall, background.

It’s the third of Jessica Taylor Caponigro’s installations which I’ve seen, each of the three having been abstracted from both architectural and also literary sources. The comparison between works made over time (a span of several years) is interesting, and maybe best reveals her intent.

Jessica Taylor Caponigro
“Black Damp”
Curated by Aimee Quinkert
May 11 – June 2, 2013
Johalla Projects
1821 W. Hubbard St., Suite 209
Chicago, IL
http://www.johallaprojects.com/

Rhona Hoffman
Fred Sandback @ Rhona Hoffman

Fred Sandback: Sculptures
April 26 – June 1, 2013
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
118 N. Peoria St.
Chicago, IL 60607
http://www.rhoffmangallery.com/

Columbia College Industry Events BFA Open Studios
Columbia College Industry Events BFA Open Studios
Above, left-to-right: Columbia College BFA Seniors Brianna Baurichter, Corinna Cowles, and Nicki Penz with artwork.

Columbia College Industry Events BFA Open Studios
Above: Madeleine Lowery with artwork in studio.

Columbia College
Industry Events
Fine Arts Open Studios
5:00 – 8:00 PM
April 18, 2013
1006 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL

The Storefront
Erik Wenzel @ The Storefront
Above: An overhead view of Erik Wenzel’s Artforum installation “Fernweh,” as seen within Brandon Alvendia’s The Storefront gallery, on the show’s opening night.

Wenzel, like Fake, above, and Andre, in the previous article, has made use of the floor for the purpose of presenting modular units in a grid pattern. Here the invitation to the audience to walk upon the artwork is wanted to be especially cheeky: an institution (magazine) and a commercial appropriation of culture resources (gallery ad) are both trodden upon, which action symbolically mimics Wenzel’s own “progress” through the real and metaphysical worlds of art.

Erik Wenzel
“Fernweh”
April 20 – May 12, 2013
The Storefront
2606 N. California Ave.
Chicago IL 60647

Vertical Gallery
The Economics of Art 2013 @ Vertical Gallery
Above: Work by Dmitry Samarov, center; Steve Seeley, at right.

The Economics of Art 2013 @ Vertical Gallery
Above: Vertical Gallery, exterior.

“The Economics of Art 2013″
Dmitry Samarov, Ian Ferguson, Julie Murphy, Steve Seeley, and Jimmy Bunnyluv, along with Anthony Freda, Dave Pressler, David Cooper, El Gato Chimney, Hernan Paganini, Klub7, Raudiel Sanudo and Ruel Pascual.
August 3 – 31, 2013
Vertical Gallery
1016 N. Western Ave.
Chicago, IL 60622
http://verticalgallery.com/




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (6/7-6/9)

June 7, 2013 · Print This Article

It’s a good night for the West Loop!

1. Before the Grave and Constant at Linda Warren Projects

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Work by Conrad Freiburg.

Linda Warren Projects is located at 327 N. Aberdeen St. Reception tonight, 6-9pm.

2. Thirteen Ways at Chicago Artists’ Coalition

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Work by Baccara (Madeleine Bailey and Helen Maurene Cooper).

Chicago Artists’ Coalition is located at 217 N. Carpenter. Reception tonight, 6-9pm.

3. Regular Colors at Document

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Work by Owen Kydd.

Document is located at 845 W. Washington Blvd. Reception tonight, 5-8pm.

4. Definitions 1 at Aspect/Ratio

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Work by Daniel Bennett.

Aspect/Ratio is located at 119 N. Peoria St. Reception tonight, 6-8pm.

5. They Way They Wanted to Sleep at Andrew Rafacz Gallery

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Work by Alex Chitty.

Andrew Rafacz Gallery is located at 835 W. Washington Blvd. Reception tonight, 5-8pm.




Top 5 Weekend Picks (7/8-7/10)

July 6, 2011 · Print This Article

1. Addendum & The Blind Light, the Pyre of Night at Linda Warren Gallery

Addendum features work by Jason Peot and The Blind Light, the Pyre of Night features work by Conrad Freiburg.

Linda Warren Gallery is located at 1052 W. Fulton Mkt. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

2. Space Out, Space In at Andrew Rafacz

Curated by Scott Wolniak. Work by Thorne Brandt, Ken Fandell, Young Joon Kwak, Jesse McLean, Shana Moulton, Jon Rafman, Andy Roche, Ben Russell, Jen Stark and Kirsten Stoltmann.

Andrew Rafacz Gallery is located at 835 W Washington Blvd. Reception is Saturday from 4-7pm.

3. People Don’t Like to Read Art at Western Exhibitions

Work by Nicholas Frank, Adriane Herman, John Parot, Mark Wagner, Joe Hardesty, Deb Sokolow, Rebecca Blakley, Elijah Burgher, Simon Evans, Cat Glennon, Meg Hitchcock, Rachel Foster, David Leggett, Andy Moore, and Angie Waller.

Western Exhibitions is located at 119 N. Peoria St., suite 2A. Reception Saturday from 6-9pm.

4. Samuel D. York at Courtney Blades

New works by Samuel D. York.

Courtney Blades is located at 1324 W Grand Ave. Reception is Friday from 7-10pm.

5. Part Wolf at What It Is

Work by Jacob Crose, Chris Holmes, and Vaughnda Johnson.

What It Is is located at 1155 Lyman. Reception Saturday from 3-8pm.  




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (3/18-3/20)

March 17, 2011 · Print This Article

1. It Is What It Isn’t at Hyde Park Art Center

Work by Conrad Freiburg.

Hyde Park Art Center is located at 5020 S. Cornell Ave. Reception is Sunday from 3-5pm.

2. dichroma at Pentagon Gallery

Work by Jason Smith, Caroline Carlsmith and Leo Kaplan.

Pentagon Gallery is located at 2655 W. Homer St. Reception Friday from 7-11pm.

3. Post-Smithson at Noble & Superior Projects

Work by Isabelle Gougenheim, Emily Irvine, and Emilie Crewe.

Noble & Superior Projects is located at 1418 W. Superior St. Reception Friday from 6-10pm.

4. BFA Show at Sullivan Galleries

School of the Art Institute of Chicago Spring BFA Show.

Reception Sullivan Galleries is located at 33 S. State St., 7th Fl. Friday from 7-9pm.

5. Frank Frazetta Tribute Exhibition at Gallery Provocateur

Exhibition to benefit JDRF juvenile diabetes. $1 at the door.

Gallery Provocateur is located at 2125 N. Rockwell St. Reception Saturday from 8pm-midnight.