Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/20-7/22)

July 20, 2012 · Print This Article

1. US Future States at Chicago Cultural Center

Work by Dan Mills.

Chicago Cultural Center is located at 78 E. Washington St. Reception Friday, 5:30-7:30pm.

2. Reflection at Experimental Sound Studio

Work by Ethan Rose.

Experimental Sound Studio is located at 5925 N. Ravenswood Ave. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

3. Synchrodogs at Public Works Gallery

Work by Tania Shcheglova and Roman Noven.

Public Works Gallery is located at 1539 N. Damen Ave. Reception Friday, 7-10pm.

4. My Idea of Fun at Ebersmoore

Curated by Michael Rea, with work by Chris Naka, Matthew Hebert, Kate Ruggeri, Kassie Teng, Zach Meyer, Ethan Gill, and John Phillip Abbott.

Ebersmoore is located at 350 North Ogden Ave, Suite 100. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

5. Send Me Your Pigeons at Galerie F

Work by John Vogl, Landland, and Casey Burns.

Galerie F is located at 2381 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.




New Fielding Practice Podcast on the Art21 Blog! Episode 16: Summer Review-O-Rama!

July 19, 2012 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports is back with another “Fielding Practice” podcast produced especially for the Art21 Blog! We haven’t done Fielding Practice in a couple of months because we’ve been working on a series of projects, most notably Bad at Sports’ summer residency/exhibition at Columbia College’s A+D Gallery (click here for details). If you’re in Chicago, come by the A+D Gallery tonight for our CLOSING FESTIVITIES and RECORD RELEASE PARTY! July 19, 5-8pm, 619 South Wabash Avenue.

On this month’s podcast, Duncan, Richard and Claudine discuss three exhibitions on view in Chicago this summer: Peripheral Views: States of America, at the Museum of Contemporary Photography;  ”Color Jam,” a summer-long, outdoor public installation by Jessica Stockholder; and we also take a look at “Zachary Cahill: USSA 2012, The People’s Palace’s Gift Shop,” an exhibition-cum-intervention in what was once the giftshop at the Chicago Cultural Center.

Click on over to the Art21 Blog to listen to the episode, and, as always, thank you so much for listening!

Doug Rickard. "#82.948842, Detroit, MI.," 2009. On view in the exhibition "Peripheral Views: States of America" at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

Doug Rickard. “#82.948842, Detroit, MI.,” 2009. On view in the exhibition “Peripheral Views: States of America” at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

“Color Jam” by Jessica Stockholder.

 




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (1/27-1/29)

January 27, 2012 · Print This Article

1. Society of the Spectacular at Co-prosperity Sphere

Work by Eric Fleischauer, Jesse McLean, Steve Ruiz, Doug Smithenry, Theo Darst, Todd Mattei, Morgan Sims, Aaron Orsini, and Adam Rux. Curated by Jake Myers & The Octagon Gallery.

Co-prosperity Sphere is located at 3221 S Morgan. Reception Friday, 7pm-12am.

2. Schematized at Firecat Projects

Work by Justin Amrhein.

Firecat Projects is located at 2124 N. Damen Ave. Reception Friday, 7-9pm.

3. Tetragrammatron Archive: The Robert Joseph Bell Institute for the Advancement of the Future at Thomas Robertello Gallery

Work by Jason Robert Bell.

Thomas Robertello Gallery is located at 27 N. Morgan St. Reception Friday, 6-8pm.

4. Morbid Curiosity at the Chicago Cultural Center

Works from The Richard Harris Collection.

Chicago Cultural Center is located at 78 E. Washington St. Reception Friday, 5:30-7:30pm.

5. Not Cool or Stoic at Slow

Work by Chuck Jones and ACRE resident Matthew Schlagbaum.

Slow is located at 2153 W 21st St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.




Extra/Ordinary

September 30, 2011 · Print This Article

Since its explosion in the late 1990s, it’s hard to ignore the increasing visibility of craft in contemporary art. In her new anthology Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art, Maria Elena Buszerk collects 14 essays and one interview to discuss the role of craft in today’s art world. The book is divided into four sections: Redefining Craft: New Theory; Craft Show: In The Realm of “Fine Art”; Craftivism; and New Functions, New Frontiers. To me the title doesn’t quite describe the contents. I might have subtitled this book something like Contemporary Craft as Fine Art, which is really what each discussion drills down to.

In what is probably my favorite essay, “Rebellious Doilies and Subversive Stitches, Writing a Craftivist History,” Kirsty Robertson talks about the use of craft in contemporary protest, specifically knitting. “Radical knitters and Stitch and Bitchers,” people who have a “sophisticated understanding that the making of any textile is connected to the capitalist system,” are the focus of much of her discussion. In her examples, she cites artists who employ the knitting as both an act of protest and fine art. The cover of Extra/Ordinary shows Pink M.24 by Marianne Jorgensen with the Cast Off Knitters. In this collaborative work, the knitters created a giant tea cozy fit to a tank. The image of the cold, hard, masculine tank of war wrapped in the warm, soft, feminine pink of the cozy is startling and effective.

Extra/Ordinary concludes with an interview of Margaret Wertheim, the founder of the Institute for Figuring, which (among other things) teaches about the intersections of art, science, nature, and craft. You might know her work with her sister Christine from The Crochet the Reef Project. Exhibited at the Chicago Cultural Center in 2007, The Crochet the Reef project asked artists and crafters to demonstrate hyperbolic space through crocheting of sea forms and coral. Before reading this book, I thought of Wertheim only as a scientist. Okay maybe a scientist, who likes to crochet, still I did not have an image of her as an artist or craftsperson. The interview changed my ideas about her work and the relationship between art and science.

Certainly this book will appeal to those who work seriously in craft, and perhaps fiber artists in general as this is the focus of most of the writers. But the surprise in Extra/Ordinary is the stitching together of what had seemed to be disparate ideas: contemporary art, craft, women’s work, capitalism, protest, and gender. Ultimately all of the essays discuss these ideas. I recommend this book. It’s nicely illustrated as well.

Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art

Edited by Maria Elena Bruszek

Duke University Press 2011, 24.95 paperback




Top 10 Picks…

January 7, 2010 · Print This Article

…To Start Off The New Year!

Hey everyone! Hope ya’ll had a good hooliday! And now we stride fourth, from the ‘Ots to the Onezies, with many a show to look forward too. This weekend (especially Friday) is particularly ripe for new year pickings, so in celebration of all that, I give you…

THE FIRST 10 OF THE NEW YEAR!
(In not much of a particular order)

Happy ‘Effen 2010!

1. In Stereo at Rotofugi

"Raised On Hi-Fi" by Netherland

I feel like I should hate this work for being hip and trite, but it just makes me think of Rosler’s 60-era “Bringing the War Home” too much for me to hate it. Make your own decision.

Reception Friday from 7-10pm. Rotofugi is located at 1953 W. Chicago Ave.

2. 3-for-1: Queen of Heaven, R&R (…&R), and Up Is Down at the Chicago Cultural Center

Joel Sheesley (left), John Allan Faier (center) & Susanne Slavick (right)

I am generally in favor of 3-for-1 shows, especially when there are actually three big shows in one place, something few other places do as well as the Cultural Center. On top of that the work looks worth seeing, to boot. Sheesley presents nearly photo-real paintings of puddles, Faier forces confrontation with death (or our refusal to confront it) with his images of mausoleums and their waiting rooms, and Slavick explores carnage in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Lebanon through over painted photographs.

Reception Friday from 6-8pm. The Chicago Cultural Center is located at 78 E. Washington St.

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