“The Object of Nostalgia” at CAA and Columbia College A+D Gallery

February 10, 2010 · Print This Article

This College Art Association panel and accompanying exhibition at Columbia College’s A+ D Gallery looks super-interesting. The CAA panel takes place tomorrow, Thursday February 11th, from 2:30-5:00pm. Afterwards, there will be a reception and a curator’s talk at the A+D Gallery from 5 to 8pm.

The Object of Nostalgia
Curated by René Marquez and Lance Winn

January 14 – February 20, 2010
February 11th, 5-8 pm
Closing Reception with a curators’ talk at 6:30 pm

“Could it be that the Avant Garde, still the dominant discussion in new art, and the self-anointed “breaker” of cultural aesthetic rules, has been the creator of a great number of tacit laws that govern the landscape of contemporary art? What is worthy to speak about when one is making “important” art? The Object of Nostalgia contemplates the nature of “sentimentality” and its conflicted relation to contemporary art. Each of the artists represented copes with nostalgia and the condition of longing in a unique and personal way, eschewing both the cold, universalist demands of Modernism and the distanced superficiality employed by Postmodern practices in favor of personal investigation, private narratives, and the full breadth of creative tools and language available to the artist.

Featuring Marlene Alt, Brian Bishop, Pamela Fraser, Dawn Gavin,Kathy High, Greg Hopkins, Erika Leppmann, Julia Lothrop, Clayton Merrell, Elaine Rutherford, and Raychael Stine.

Clayton Merrill, Supernovaasteroidcometsun, 2008




College Art Association Quantifies the Economic Downturn

February 9, 2010 · Print This Article

The CAA which holds it’s yearly conference in Chicago is this weekend and to give a face to the economic downturn (and nightmares to every newly minted MFA looking for a teaching position) they realesed a report detailing the decline in positions from FY2008 to FY2009. In short we are talking almost a 38% decline across the board.

Ceramics & Fiber continue the steepest decline posting around 40% and Sculpture/Installation/Environmental Art posts a surprising growth of 125%. Art History continues to be the most resistant to overall change but still shows growth in Asian studies at the limited expense of Modernism/20th Century American Art.

More detailed data (including state by state breakdowns) and the entire report can be seen here

Studio Art FY09 FY08
Any 629 1,005
Graphic/Industrial/Object 185 246
Digital/Media/Animation 150 220
Drawing/Printmaking/Paper 96 130
Sculpture/Installation/Environmental Art 92 99
Ceramics/Metals/Fiber 89 92
Photography 85 143
Art Education 73 90
Film/Video 70 89
Foundations 59 90



Midweek Clips 9/23/09

September 24, 2009 · Print This Article

Picture 1

Bravo’s “Art Star” reality show hasn’t even hit the air waves yet, and already we’ve got another art contest on our hands. Our vote for most ridiculous news of the week comes with the Guggenheim’s announcement of Rob Pruitt’s “First Annual Art Awards,” modeled after Hollywood’s Oscars. Pruitt  conceived the awards to celebrate “select individuals, exhibitions, and projects that have made a significant impact on the field of contemporary art during the past year.”  Oh, and just to keep things bubbly, the star-studded list of presenters will include boyfriend-girlfriend art/fashion design couple of the moment Nate Lowman and Mary-Kate Olsen. There’s a formal dinner afterwards, and after that an after-party and, and….oh, just click on the link and read the rest for yourself (including the video of the nominee announcements). I can’t take anymore. The rest of our midweek round-up, some of which is actually meaningful (though you’ll have to be the judge of that) as follows:

*Art Institute of Chicago appoints Alison Fisher as the Harold and Margot Schiff Assistant Curator of Architecture in the Department of Architecture and Design. Her focus will be on the Art Institute’s architecture holdings from 1850 to 1945, and she will oversee the drawings, models, and archives of Frank Lloyd Wright, Daniel Burnham, Louis Sullivan and other American architectural masters.

*Artist Mark Bradford among those awarded 2009 MacArthur Genius Grants.

*Bill Viola changes mind, decides to meet with Pope for Vatican cultural dialogue on the relationship between faith and art.

*Franklin Sirmans appointed chief curator of contemporary art at LACMA, succeeding Lynn Zelevansky.

*Proposed Pennsylvania budget agreement extends state sales taxes to arts and cultural performances and venues but exempts movies and sports events; Philadelphia arts leaders organize in protest.

*Brandeis committee recommends keeping Art Museum open, but punts on the issue of the proposed sale of its collection.

*NEA Chair Rocco Landesman explains reasoning behind demotion of communications director Yossi Sergant.

*Paul Chan’s “Top 5 Things That Will Get You Arrested in Minneapolis” aka Top 5 Things We Should Do Together To Make Something Interesting.” (Via Eyeteeth).

*Virtual flip book: View all 160 pages of Proximity magazine in less than 20 seconds. Then go buy the real thing. It’s a good issue, as always.

*A visit to an exhibition about the history of Ikea.

*Artnet writer Grant Mandarino provides Cliff’s Notes on the new Fall art magazines.

*Chicago job posting: Projectionists and room monitors needed for upcoming College Art Association (CAA) Annual Conference in Chicago. If you’re interested, see here.




Wednesday Clips

May 20, 2009 · Print This Article

Shannon Keller, Knitter. Keller's work is on view at Show Cave in L.A. (via World's Best Ever).A few stories, blog posts, and interesting discussions in Chicago and beyond that are on my mind this week.

**Image credit: Shannon Keller, Knitter. Keller’s work is currently on view at Show Cave in L.A. (via The World’s Best Ever).

*CAA Study finds over-reliance on part-time faculty in American higher education.

*New York Times looks at how artists are adjusting to economic hardship.

*Edward Winkleman asks his readers why the view that art is ‘unmasculine’ still persists?

*Chicago artist and illustrator Lauren Nassef’s “A Drawing a Day” still going strong.

*Joanne Mattera bites back after receiving a cease and desist letter warning her not to write about vanity galleries (a.k.a. ‘pay to show’ schemes).

*The architecture of ‘evil lairs’ at BLDGBLOG (via C-Monster). Makes me long for the days I still had time to play videogames.

*Chicagoist’s report on the Society for News Design’s conference and discussions about what’s happening in the Chicago journalism scene. Very interesting write-up here, including follow-up comments.

*”The practice of art gets the criticism it deserves”–Great piece on how the internet is changing critics and art criticism by John Haber.

*Another good read on the above topic: “Arts Writing and ‘The New Thing'” at Peripheral Vision. (Meg has also twittered numerous of-the-moment links on the topic of arts journalism this past week, make sure to check those out too).

That’s all for now. I’m off to see Several Silences at The Renaissance Society.