Around The Coyote Discount Tickets?

October 16, 2008 · Print This Article

As a special treat for all you Bad At Sports listeners, Around the Coyote would like to offer discount admission to our 2008 Fall Arts Festival October 17-19 at Plumbers Hall (1340 W. Washington St.) in the West Loop neighborhood of Chicago.  Go to

www.going.com/aroundthecoyotevip to get half-price daily admission as well as half-price tickets to the opening night party which includes food, beer and a weekend pass for the entire festival weekend!”




Chicago Mag Names BaS Best Podcast of 2008

August 2, 2008 · Print This Article

Chicago magazine names Bad at Sports best Podcast of 2008

Chicago Magazine has doubled down on a bad bet they made in February by not only backing the statement they made that Bad at Sports was one of the best Chicago art sites but now has named it the Best Podcast of 2008. Everyone here wants to say thank you for the award and for putting us in a position where we now have to perform to expectations.

We have a lot of growth and new projects in the works. So with the Art season starting up very soon keep checking in to see the interviews, articles, news & video that is coming down the pike. We hope to make the next year better then any before.

Quoted from the Article:

“Founded in 2005 by two friends over a drink, Bad at Sports (badatsports.com) is a podcast that manages to educate and entertain on a subject that causes the brains of most people to fog over and disengage: contemporary art. Originally a fun side project, the weekly interview show invites guests-from emerging talent to bona fide heavies like Kerry James Marshall to discuss art exhibitions, trends and news events such as the recent death of Robert Rauschenberg. With it’s loose, finding-it’s-way vibe, the show yields discussions so illuminating you begin to wonder whether the hosts-Duncan MacKenzie, a 31 year old artist and lecturer, and Richard Holland, a 36 year old artist and lawyer-are nursing dreams about becoming broadcasting professionals. WBEZ, are you listening?”




EMERGENCY ANTI-ARTS WARNING! Call your Alderman Now!

May 13, 2008 · Print This Article

THIS WEDNESDAY the City Council will be voting on a proposed ordinance that would ruin small clubs, small theater companies, and basically anything put on at a small venue (less than 500 people) in the city.

The ordinance would require anyone putting on small shows (even garage bands just promoting their own gigs) to be licensed as a “promoter” subject to a $2000 license fee and requirements for $300,000 liability insurance for any event. Contact your alderman now and let them know you don’t want to see the arts strangled this way — Do you really want the only live art in Chicago to be comprised of performances of “Wicked” and farewell concert tours by 80s hair bands? Not that there’s anything wrong with either –but don’t you want choices, variety, and a city where artists are free to perform, struggle, succeed, and even fail? Whether you’re a fan of open mike nights, spoken word, small theater groups, whatever … You need to speak up now, because all of these will bite the dust if this becomes the law in the city.

Tell your alderman that an ordinance like this would have guaranteed that Chicago could never have been the home of Second City or the Lookingglass Theater, or the launching ground for countless musicians, actors, and playwrights and poets, and that audiences and artists alike will suffer, and our city will become poorer in spirit, if this proposed ordinance becomes law.

To find your Alderman, follow the following link:
http://www.chicityclerk.com/citycouncil/alderman/find.html

And do it before Wednesday’s vote!




Abdessemed Exhibition Closed Under Threats of Violence

March 30, 2008 · Print This Article

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San Francisco Art Institute has canceled closed the controversial Abdessemed exhibition as well as the public forum. The exhibition was curated by Hou Hanru, who was interviewed by us in Episode 129.

From the SFAI Website:

In response to a series of violent threats by animal-rights extremists, the San Francisco Art Institute announced today that the public discussion on Adel Abdessemed’s exhibition Don’t Trust Me, scheduled for Monday, 31 March, has been canceled. For the same reasons, the exhibition itself, which was temporarily suspended on Wednesday, 26 March, has now been permanently closed.

“We unconditionally repudiate these threats against SFAI,” stated President Chris Bratton: “My first concern is with the safety and security of SFAI’s students, faculty, staff, and their families, as well as members of the public that regularly visit the campus. In light of the violent threats by extremists against this institution, we are unfortunately forced to cancel any public discussion or display regarding this artwork.”

Soon after it opened, the Abdessemed exhibition became the subject of an orchestrated campaign by a number of animal-rights groups, including Animal Liberation Front (ALF), In Defense of Animals (IDA), and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). One result of this campaign was a parallel onslaught of explicit death threats and threats of sexual violence against SFAI staff members and their families. The swift escalation from controversy to credible threats has regrettably forced SFAI to make a decision unprecedented in its 137-year history.

“Though we’ve decided to take this action,” continued President Bratton, “SFAI stands behind the exhibition as an instance of a long-standing and serious commitment, on SFAI’s part, to reflection on, and free and open discussion of, contemporary global art and culture. As an institution, we take seriously our responsibility to encourage and promote such dialogue.”

“The artist,” continued President Bratton, “participated in an already-existing circuit of food production in a rural community in Mexico. The animals were raised for food, purchased, and professionally slaughtered. In fact, what causes the controversy is that Abdessemed, an artist, entered this exchange, filmed it, and exhibited it.”

“Here, then, is a case where highly local assumptions about how things are produced have come to inform how the world itself is seen. In general, consumption in the US is fueled by things produced out of sight and from far away. In many cultures, particularly those of the global south including Mexico, the killing of animals for food is often direct and present, not concealed from sight as is the case of industrialized food production here. This distinction is certainly relevant to Don’t Trust Me. Admittedly, this is an uncomfortable confrontation for some, but is nevertheless a real condition not only for animals, but also for the people whose lives are bound up with them. Simply stated, it is an outrage that threats of violence have, in this case, succeeded in derailing a public debate on issues that are critical to our everyday lives.”

The press release can be found here.




Chicago MCA Director Leaves

January 30, 2008 · Print This Article

Robert Fitzpatrick
Robert Fitzpatrick, director and CEO of the Museum of Contemporary Art since 1998, has become international managing director of Haunch of Venison, a 6-year-old gallery for contemporary art with spaces in London, Zurich and Berlin.

Mr. Fitzpatrick, 67, stated when he took the position that he would stay no more then 10 years in the position and has proven his word literal.

He is now moving to New York, where his new position would be to oversee the fall opening of a 20,000-square-foot branch of the Haunch of Venison gallery at Rockefeller Center.

Read more here in the Chicago Tribune