Episode 427: Jen Delos Reyes

November 4, 2013 · Print This Article

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Jen Delos Reyes
This week: Duncan, Richard, and Jason Dunda talk to a cast of thousands led by Jen Delos Reyes!
Jen Delos Reyes is an artist originally from Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Her research interests include the history of socially engaged art, group work, band dynamics, folk music, and artists’ social roles.

She has exhibited works across North America and Europe, and has contributed writing to various catalogues and institutional publications. She has received numerous grants and awards including a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Grant. Jen is the founder and director of Open Engagement, a conference on socially engaged art practice and herself speaks widely on Art and Social Practice at conferences and institutions around the world.

Jen is currently an Assistant Professor at Portland State University where she teaches in the Art and Social Practice MFA program.

photo credit: Motoya Nakamura




Episode 424: Sarah Conaway

October 14, 2013 · Print This Article

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Conaway
This week: Duncan live from LA! This week he talks with artist Sarah Conaway.

Sarah Conaway (b. 1972 York, Pennsylvania) makes seemingly straightforward photographs that invite us to think magically, imbuing mundane objects with mystery and potential. Her recent photographs—printed in a range of sizes and primarily in black and white, with an occasional work in vibrant color—capture a series of actions set up by the artist in her the studio. Beyond the objects or materials that they portray, they express a residue, aura, or presence that we sense but do not necessarily see depicted. Although the act of photographing her sculptural constructions and still lifes—at times as ordinary as a crumpled strip of canvas or a piece of string—reduces the subjects’ dimensionality, it focuses our attention on texture, light, and shadow—and the sheer pleasure of looking. Conaway’s techniques are deceptively simple: her touch is light, the scale of the forms uncertain, the color and contrast stark. These arrangements of simple materials and common objects reveal their potential as architecture, figure, landscape, fantasy, or apparition while maintaining a tenuous state of balance and compositional harmony.




Episode 414: David Linneweh

August 5, 2013 · Print This Article

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David Linneweh
This week: We talk to artist, podcaster and educator David Linneweh. We discuss David’s podcast Studio Break and his kickstarter campaign “Remembering Place”.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/393759744/remembering-place




Episode 413: SIGGRAPH/Gregory Sholette

July 30, 2013 · Print This Article

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LeninVisa20X30outline_web
This week: First SF Checks in from SIGGRAPH! Brian haunts the halls of the Anaheim Convention Center at SIGGRAPH 2013. First he sits down with Victoria Szabo, curator of this year’s gallery exhibition XYZN: Scale. Following, he talks with Jackie Morie, founder of the Digital Arts Community about the role of the community in the art world and the technology community.

Then, we talk to Greg Sholette!

Gregory Sholette is a New York-based artist, writer, and founding member of Political Art Documentation/Distribution (PAD/D: 1980-1988) and REPOhistory (1989-2000). His recent books include Dark Matter: Art and Politics in an Age of Enterprise Culture (Pluto Press, 2010) and the co-authored book It’s The Political Economy, Stupid with Oliver Ressler, (Pluto 2013), which is also a traveling exhibition (New York, NY; Thessaloniki, Greece; Pori, Finland; Belgrade, Slovenia; Chicago, Illinois). The first episode of his graphic sci-fi novel Double City appeared in Frieze magazine (summer 2013), and Chapter 2 in Shifter:21 (Oct. 2013). His most recent installations include: Exposed Pipe/ ماسورة موسيقية for the American University Beirut art gallery; Torrent for Printed Matter Books in Chelsea; iDrone for cyberartspace.net; 15 Islands for Robert Moses for the Queens Museum of Art Panorama, and the traveling installation Imaginary Archive (Wellington, New Zealand; Galway, Ireland; Graz, Austria; Kiev, Ukraine). He is a frequent lecturer and seminar leader in the US and abroad, teaches at Queens College and the City University Grad Center, is active in Social Practice Queens, is a member of Gulf Labor Coalition, and serves as an academic adviser for the Home Workspace Program in Beirut, Lebanon.




Episode 412: Amanda Ross-Ho

July 22, 2013 · Print This Article

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Amanda Ross-Ho
This week: We talk with artist Amanda Ross-Ho!

Amanda Ross-Ho was born in Chicago in 1975. She currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Amanda Ross-Ho’s work is inspired by detritus: the clutter and remnants of daily existence, and the ‘negative space’ of things over looked. Ranging from sculpture, installation, painting, and photography, her work seeks to uncover the subtle beauty of coincidence and anomaly. Working from source material as diverse as newspaper articles, narcotics agency records, life aspiration manuals, and home-craft instruction booklets, Ross-Ho highlights points of cultural ‘intersection’ to create extrinsic portraits of contemporary zeitgeist. Throughout Ross-Ho’s work is a sense of de-familiarisation and detachment, a numbing alienation contrived from everyday ephemera. Ross-Ho’s paintings similarly broach the uncanny. Translated from images of doilies or macramé wall hangings, her intricate webs are manufactured in grandiose scale, cut from painted black canvas dropcloths, or carved in sheet rock. Their recognition and domestic symbolism becomes estranged, placed out of context through size and materiality. Construing kitsch with the elegance of minimalism, Ross-Ho presents the sentimentality of tchotchke as emotive voids, displacing homey intimacy to the realm of objective contemplation.