Bad at Sports Goes to The Armory Show

April 4, 2008 · Print This Article

Entrance to the Armory ShowSadly the title truthfully should read “Bad at Sports makes a mad dash in The Armory cause the phone is ringing and everyone wants you back to put out a fire” but “Goes to The Armory Show” gives it a more fun and lighthearted feel as I would have wanted the visit to be. Sadly this is the 21st century so in keeping with it; here is a caffeine induced breakdown of The Armory Show: 2008. Read more




You Fucking Sellout.

February 11, 2008 · Print This Article

Lori Waxman sent me a note today saying that I had too check out this blog and post something about it.  She was right.  I love the Sellout Blog.

It is the perfect blend of useful information and random “experience of life in the arts, style life dissections.”

Other notable blogosphere art things…

Art Info Updated their site design and have been posting steadily and it is often worth checking out for Museum and blue chip level stuff.

Art Review magazine rebuilt their whole set up to be the most bizarrely exhaustive art site on the interweb.  Part Art Magazine, part Art MySpace, and part open source art blog, it proposes itself as all thing contemporary art.   It might be but it is so big it scares me and I open it an have trouble remembering what I was looking for.

I also have to mention New Art TV which is an all art, web oriented video “channel.”  Because who doesn’t want to watch Alex Katz talk about his boring paintings. (It is better then the paintings themselves)




That Darn Melanie Schiff

January 28, 2008 · Print This Article

Melanie continues to be one of the freshest bright lights in Chicago Art community!

Aside from teaching, making, and curating as any good young Chicago artist does, she is one of only two Chicago based artists (Jennifer Montgomery is the other) in the 2008 Whitney Biennial and is featured in a sizable article in the new (Feb) issue of Modern Painter.

(Although it is not the issue currently featured on their site)

Our “hats go off” to one of the great active members of this art community who deserves all the attention she can get.

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Episode 125: Tim Fleming/Art Reviews

January 20, 2008 · Print This Article

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Tim Fleming

100 minutes of raw power! Brian and Marc talk to Tim Fleming, Director of Art LA. If that weren’t enough for a whole show, we go that extra mile and knock your socks off!!!

Lori Waxman and Duncan check out the current batch of shows around the West Loop. Did they review your show, oh yes they did, you’d better listen.
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Brian and Marc review Tony Lebat’s “Bulk”

January 8, 2008 · Print This Article

Tony Labatt

Brian and Marc recently collaborated on a review of Tony Lebat’s Bulk at Queens Nails Annex for Shotgun Review. Here’s an excerpt:

“Tony Labat’s exhibition Bulk opened to throngs of art students, smoking and drinking on the sidewalk. At first, the event seemed like any other gallery reception. However, as a show focusing on the manifestation of social relations in an art event, the students hadn’t come to see anything in particular, but to rather simply be with one another. With the gallery’s main space converted to a bar, complete with amateur bartenders, swill cocktails at criminal prices, and makeshift wooden tables; Bulk turned Queens Nails Annex into a speakeasy, one built like a cheap theatrical set.

Bulk’s events have drawn together those who share in a common perspective – art students, gallerists, curators, etc.- participating in their prescribed roles of social exchange and power dynamics, as if the events had a written script. The exhibition doesn’t challenge itself to compose the audience, who provide its labor, or translate their efforts into meaning. Any examination into the relationship between the mechanics of audience as a means of production, and how it conditions the possibilities of interpretation, is absent. Without intervention, the events emerged as expected; codified and rigid. Creating work that fosters social relations shouldn’t reduce an event to the calling together of a coterie, turning the artist into a socialite of aesthetics whose practice would be a chain of well-hosted shin-digs. Bulk is emblematic of this festivalist, lackadaisical attitude that’s far too common in contemporary art.”

The full review can be found on Shotgun Review. This writing is an extension of a survey of the San Francisco art scene Brian wrote for Artnet.