Friday, September 20th Edition of The EXPO Register

September 20, 2013 · Print This Article

Issue Two Front

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Thursday, September 19th Edition of The EXPO Register

September 19, 2013 · Print This Article

Issue One Front

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Episode 393: Jesper Juul & Oliver Warden & art fair madness

March 11, 2013 · Print This Article

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This week: Video games. Amanda talking about porn and boobs. People behaving badly. Oh, yeah, some art. It’s after 3 AM.  I’m tired you aren’t getting a huge, organized note, go and google stuff, you can do it. I am even more nasally than normal in the audio, damned airplane petri dishes.

This is a show for the ages.

Jesper Juul is an assistant professor at the New York University Game Center. He has been working with the development of video game theory since the late 1990′s. His publications include Half-Real on video game theory, and A Casual Revolution on how puzzle games, music games, and the Nintendo Wii brought video games to a new audience. He maintains the blog The Ludologist on “game research and other important things”. His most recent book is The Art of Failure: An Essay on the Pain of playing Video Games. http://www.jesperjuul.net

 

Oliver Warden (b. 1971, Cleveland, Ohio) is a multidisciplinary artist, working both in the realms of contemporary art and technology. When online, he goes as his avatar name, ROBOTBIGFOOT. The majority of his body of work is inspired by and culled from his experiences in the virtual world, as he spends about 40 hours a week inside the realms of Counter-Strike, Left 4 Dead, and various independent titles. It can be said that Warden essentially, and by 21st Century definition, lives in two worlds: online and off. His paintings, ranging in size of 1 ft to 21 ft canvases, are made by a unique process of pouring Galkyd onto canvas laid horizontally in his Bushwick studio. The semi-transparent and glossy layers build over each other in intricate and elaborate geographies, creating an effects-driven and technologically mediated super-world. His cameraless-photography is created on his computer, in virtual spaces. One series that I find especially innovative shows the “edge of world” in the video game Tribes; Warden literally played the game until there were no more challenges or objectives to complete, and after reaching the literal end of the map (where the playable area stops), he took thousands of screen shots. The results are works on paper, presented as pixelated photographs.  His performance pieces are the third factor of his work, creating a complete balanced and intentional body. Inspired by his interactive experiences, he built a body of work around notions of privacy, voyeurship and control.  Stalking people in Central Park at midnight and “capturing” them on video, living in a school wall for a week and pulling covert ops at night and sitting inside a chair as unknowing sitters sat on his lap, all challenged and occasionally broke the rules of engagement and participation.




Episode 366: Mika Tajima and the India Art Fair

September 4, 2012 · Print This Article

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This week: A BAS bureau twofer!

First Patricia talks to Mika Tajima.

This week, Patricia Maloney chats with artist Mika Tajima at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art just before the opening of the exhibition Stage Presence, where her collaborative film, performance, and sculptural project, Today is Not a Dress Rehearsal, is currently on view through October 8, 2012 .

Mika Tajima, was born in Los Angeles, and lives and works in Brooklyn. She earned a BA from Bryn Mawr College in 1997, an MFA from Columbia University in 2003, and attended The Fabric Workshop and Museum Apprentice Training Program in 2003. Her work has been included in the exhibitions The Pedestrians, South London Gallery, London (2011); Transaction Abstraite, New Galerie, Paris (2011); The Double, Bass Museum, Miami (2010); Knight’s Move, Sculpture Center, Long Island City (2010); Today is Not a Dress Rehearsal, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2009); The Extras, X Initiative, New York (2009); Learn to Communicate Like a Fucking Normal Person, Art Production Fund, New York (2009); Deal or No Deal, Kevin Bruk Gallery, Miami (2008); 2008 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2008); Mika Tajima: Broken Plaid/Holding Your Breath (taking the long way), RISD Museum, Providence (2008); The Double, The Kitchen, New York (2008); Sympathy for the Devil, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2007); Music Is a Better Noise, PS.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City (2006); Grass Grows Forever in Every Possible Direction, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2005); Echoplex, Swiss Institute Contemporary Art, New York (2005); and Uncertain States of America, Astrup Fearnley Museum, Oslo, Norway (2005). She is part of the music-based performance group New Humans.

The following is part of the ongoing collaboration between Bad at Sports and Art Practical. You can read an abridged version of the interview here.

Next: New India correspondant Tanya Gill goes to the India Art Fair!

Tanya Gill, a Chicago artist living in New Delhi, wanders through the India Art Fair of 2012. Over the course of four days she spoke to Gallery owners and artists, and found a surprising number of Chicago connects. Recorded here are her conversations with Kiran Chandra, Renuka Sawhney of The Guild, artist Vibha Galhotra, artist Ram Rahman from The SAHMAT Collective, Laura Williams of Art 18/21, artists Joan Livingston and Katarina Weslien from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Ritika Baheti of the Autonomous Public Laboratory Project, and four living works of art by Preeti Chandrakant.




Episode 353: Jenni Sorkin

June 4, 2012 · Print This Article

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This week: Jenni Sorkin! Also, we talk with the fine folks at Expo Chicago.