Episode 496: Justin Cooper

March 2, 2015 · Print This Article

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This week: This show has everything, the Amanda Browder Show, Justin Cooper, Richard finally records a new outro, and some of the most annoying music ever used on BAS!!

NYC/Browder talks to Brooklyn based artist Justin Cooper. Post a few deadpan jokes, and moments of spacing out…(edited of course)  we discuss his history of his work, and his installationSpreadsheet, and performance Mowers of Ten presented by the Art-In-Buildings program, and Monique Meloche Gallery. The project is in conjunction with The Armory Show that is going on next week.

Employing a strategy of “endless introducing,” Cooper plays both host and hosted, in an effort to eradicate the line between these two states. With the classic Charles and Ray Eames film, Powers of Ten, as inspiration, and Cooper’s installation, Spreadsheet serving as a backdrop, the performance aggregates comedic bits, routines, acts, sound fragments, free floating signifiers, and chains of non sequitors systematized into miniature narratives, into a simulation of comedy. Like “Friends” minus the laugh track or AstroTurf as a surrogate for suburban lawn, Mowers of Ten, highlights the impossibility of reconciling the intellectual with the visceral. “I know this isn’t funny…and yet.” “I know this isn’t grass…and yet.”

http://moniquemeloche.com/artists/justin-cooper/

SHOUT OUT TO AMANDA:

Art Fair weekend is next weekend in NYC! The Armory, VOLTA, Scope, etc. etc.

BUT Time to go see the SPRING/BREAK Art Fair. Amanda Browder and a ton of very cool artists in NYC will be showing at this fair in the abandoned section of the Post Office on 33rd Street between 8th and 9th. It is a fair of guest curators who are bringing their collection of artists to each room in the massive office space.

Look for her on the 4th floor with curators Jacob Rhodes of Field Projects and Jen Schwarting.  You can also find: Adam Parker Smith, ESP TV., Siebren Versteeg, Julia Oldham and Trish Tillman




Episode 393: Jesper Juul & Oliver Warden & art fair madness

March 11, 2013 · Print This Article

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This week: Video games. Amanda talking about porn and boobs. People behaving badly. Oh, yeah, some art. It’s after 3 AM.  I’m tired you aren’t getting a huge, organized note, go and google stuff, you can do it. I am even more nasally than normal in the audio, damned airplane petri dishes.

This is a show for the ages.

Jesper Juul is an assistant professor at the New York University Game Center. He has been working with the development of video game theory since the late 1990’s. His publications include Half-Real on video game theory, and A Casual Revolution on how puzzle games, music games, and the Nintendo Wii brought video games to a new audience. He maintains the blog The Ludologist on “game research and other important things”. His most recent book is The Art of Failure: An Essay on the Pain of playing Video Games. http://www.jesperjuul.net

 

Oliver Warden (b. 1971, Cleveland, Ohio) is a multidisciplinary artist, working both in the realms of contemporary art and technology. When online, he goes as his avatar name, ROBOTBIGFOOT. The majority of his body of work is inspired by and culled from his experiences in the virtual world, as he spends about 40 hours a week inside the realms of Counter-Strike, Left 4 Dead, and various independent titles. It can be said that Warden essentially, and by 21st Century definition, lives in two worlds: online and off. His paintings, ranging in size of 1 ft to 21 ft canvases, are made by a unique process of pouring Galkyd onto canvas laid horizontally in his Bushwick studio. The semi-transparent and glossy layers build over each other in intricate and elaborate geographies, creating an effects-driven and technologically mediated super-world. His cameraless-photography is created on his computer, in virtual spaces. One series that I find especially innovative shows the “edge of world” in the video game Tribes; Warden literally played the game until there were no more challenges or objectives to complete, and after reaching the literal end of the map (where the playable area stops), he took thousands of screen shots. The results are works on paper, presented as pixelated photographs.  His performance pieces are the third factor of his work, creating a complete balanced and intentional body. Inspired by his interactive experiences, he built a body of work around notions of privacy, voyeurship and control.  Stalking people in Central Park at midnight and “capturing” them on video, living in a school wall for a week and pulling covert ops at night and sitting inside a chair as unknowing sitters sat on his lap, all challenged and occasionally broke the rules of engagement and participation.




Episode 239: Mads Lynnerup

March 28, 2010 · Print This Article

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This week: Patricia sits down with artist Mads Lynnerup during his recent sojourn in San Francisco. They talk about spotting Cyndi Lauper at the New Museum, precocious nerdy kids at the Guggenheim, navigating the ever-growing professionalization of the art world, everyday routines, and the merits of being a prankster.

Mad Lynnerup was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and lives and works in Copenhagen and New York. He completed his MFA from Columbia University in 2007 and received a BFA from San Francisco Art Institute in 2001. He has shown his work at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; The Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; P.S. 1 and Socrates Sculpture Park, both New York; and Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw. Lynnerup works across such diverse media as video, sculpture, drawing, and printmaking. Many of the themes in his work have roots in his constant interest in the everyday and his surroundings.

This is the third collaboration between Art Practical and Bad At Sports.

Image: Routines (Sønder Boulevard), 2008 (video still); installation, video and poster series. Courtesy of the Artist and Baer Ridgeway Exhibitions, San Francisco.
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Episode 137: New York Art Fair Madness

April 13, 2008 · Print This Article

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We the Armory Show Rejects
This week, the New York Art Fair explosion.

John Waters v. Amanda Browder, Amanda and Tom get kicked out of Armory, Christopher Hudgens on mic. WHAT MORE DO YOU NEED!!!

Amanda and Tom talk to just about everyone, well not really, but they do talk to loads of interesting collectors, gallerists, artists, Europeans, and other assorted folk as they barnstorm the fairs.

And the return of Amanda’s Mom wisecracks, no not really, but this show has an intro guaranteed to piss of Brian and Marc.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_137-NYC_Art_fair_madness.mp3