EDITION #9

May 13, 2013 · Print This Article

Rose Halpern

TWENDING

  • Headlessness
  • Pointed Shouldews
  • Space Tennis
  • “Inappwopwiate beadwok”
  • Empty suitcases
  • Gas masks
  • Tunics
  • Veils
  • Abstwact bulk
  • Inconvenient pockets
  • Pockets-as-hand-passageways
  • Deconstwucted Camo pattewns
  • Bustles (many of them)
  • Expanding spatial wadius via bulky, geometwically shaped layews
  • Mad Men on sizzuwp
  • Anime
  • Neon yellow, khaki combo

Francisco Gonzalez

Jacqueline Nadolski
  • Man clothes
  • Visible body

Tenley George

Sam Salvo

Special report by twend tracker Caroline Picard.

The Weatherman Report

Gustave Caillebotte, Rue de Paris, temps de pluie, 1877 (oil on canvas, 83.54″ x 108.74″).

SMALLTIME ARCHIPHILE:

The Bachman House

Chicago has had characters – both architects and buildings – throughout it’s development as a place where things get built, regardless of if people want it or not. Bruce Goff, a transplanted Chicagoan, was a character and produced them. Goff was a child prodigy that started practicing architecture at 12-fucking-years-old and was doing weird things before they were cool i.e. Pre-PoMo; hell, pre-WWII.

The Bachman house was completed in 1947 and landmarked in the 1980s. This single-family home sports a straight-up sheet metal façade that’s closer to a shed than a home. The sharp triangulation and peak of the Bachman House roof volume gets bisected by an even more acute triangle, held up by two symmetrical equilateral ones – architects did love drawing with their triangles! The front and center in-your-face nature of this bungalow only gets weirder by placing it within a typical Chicago neighborhood laden with brick 3-flats and masonry walk-ups. Goff’s fortress (many people compare his work to castles) does not embrace local flavor superficially. Instead, it totally engages with Chicago’s, “build first and ask questions later” attitude to architectural culture. Unfortunately, that approach comes with a disclaimer that the Daley’s and Rahm both espouse: “nothing or no one stands in the way of development.” Meaning not even landmark status can save buildings anymore in Chicago.

Maybe they didn’t get the memo that architects are used to projects never getting built, let alone mostly working in virtual reality, so you can kill a building but you can’t kill architecture.

Located at 1244 W. Carmen Ave, Chicago, IL 60640.

.gif of “Sitting Bull” from the NAFM

.gif of “earring” from the NAFM

Native American Fax Machine:

.gif of “Trail of Tears”

Featuring work generated rounds of Harkins’ own game, Native American Fax Machine is on view through May 25th at Happy Collaborationists. If these .gif’s are any indication (which they obviously are), this show is definitely worth checking out. Bonus points for contributing to the landline trend! The instructions for your own round of Native American Fax Machine are included below:

A game played with 6 or more players.
Each player selects a card with a noun.
Each player has 3 minutes to draw the noun.
The players move the drawings clockwise.

Players then have 1 minute to copy the drawing.
Players pass the drawings until they have made the same amount of copies as players.
The last person to draw the noun has to guess the original noun on the card.

Composite of “caribou” from the NAFM

.gif of “caribou” from the NAFM

E-Dogz: Zom­bie Apoc­a­lyp­tic Refuge Center

When the zom­bie apoc­a­lypse goes down, we’ll all have to think on their toes– watch­ing our backs as we hit the roads– escap­ing the rav­en­ous army of undead relent­lessly pur­su­ing our cra­nial tis­sues. The liv­ing will have to eat too and the mobile kitchen of E-Dogz will be a bea­con of nour­ish­ment in these end days. Eric “E-Dog” May has teamed up with Rimas Simaitis to equip the food trailer to travel land and sea, feed­ing the peo­ple in these dyer times. The zom­bie plague actu­ally began gen­er­a­tions ago, con­jured through black magic by Voodoo priests on island nations dur­ing the glory days of the high seas. To honor the zom­bie resis­tance of yore, E-Dogz: Zom­bie Apoc­a­lypse Refuge Cen­ter will host a tiki party to ward off zom­bies and serve up dooms­day cui­sine and cir­cuses. This event may fea­ture, but will not be lim­ited to: Spam nigiri, ento­mophagy (look it up), flam­ing cock­tails, and/or coconut short wave radios.

TODAY!
Eric May & Rimas Simaitis present:
E-Dogz: Zom­bie Apoc­a­lyp­tic Refuge Center
May 13th, 5pm– 7pm
Gallery 400
in response to Halflifers




EDITION #7

April 15, 2013 · Print This Article

Super pro-fesh and stylin’ rope jumper, artist, Miami native and three-time SAIC freshman, Walter Latimer after his mind blowing performance at this year’s Art Bash.

Say what!?

News broke this weekend that artist, Walter Latimer, is a former Junior Olympics jump rope record holder! Check out the soon to be viral video of his performance at the SAIC Art Bash.

Video courtesy of Jack Schneider.

T of the Town

Spotted: Matt Austin at the opening for Todd Diederich’s Luminous Flux opening at Johalla Projects with a proof of Diederich’s forthcoming book printed by LATITUDE and available through The Perch.

Spotted at the Katelyn Farstad opening: Julius Ceasar throwing shade at The Propeller Fund in their half-hearted donation appeal.

  • We heard there’s going to be a secret (not anymore!) extension of ACRE Residency’s April 15th Application deadline. So there’s really no excuse, APPLY TODAY! You won’t regret it. (Disclaimer: I didn’t.)
  • In a characteristic move, Pedro Velez calls out an unsuspecting Ryan Coffey on twitter. #RUDE
  • Chicago closet-cum-gallery, Queer Thoughts, holds successful benefit auction, city continues to wonder why?
  • Spotted: Independent Art Champion and Champion of the Arts, Anthony Stepter at the opening of Has the World Already Been Made? x4 by Daniel G. Baird & Haseeb Ahmed at Roots & Culture.

The Weatherman Report

Joan Mitchell, Minnesota, 1980 Oil on canvas (four panels), 102 1/2 x 243 inches (260.4 x 617.2 cm). Collection of the Joan Mitchell Foundation, New York.

Now on view at The Poetry Foundation.

Reading is Fundamental

  • SAIC Secret Admirers. Looks like SAIC has a crush on Prof. Fleischauer and butts. Also, this is probably the best work from the BFA show. (Courtesy of Sofia Leiby.)
  • You down with OPP? Chicago’s own artist-turned-entreprenuer, Jenny Kendler, is quoted in this fluffy piece about artist’s websites being not websites, but “constructing a narrative”. At least the photo of Kendler is cute.
  • Performing Audiences and Choreographing Coughs. Finally, some real journalism. NPR’s Alva Noë tackles the long-standing question of why audiences cough so damn much during live performances. “They are uncomfortable. They are uncertain. They are, very often, bored out of their minds.” What a surprise. In related news, Rapid Pulse is back for a 2013 installment.

AAM calls out Obama Budget

In an unusual turn of events, everyone is talking about the Obama Administration Budget Proposal for the 2014 Fiscal Year.

The American Alliance of Museums analysis of Obama’s proposed budget is less sexy than a big schmoozy gala, but actually worth reading. As is CultureGrrls somewhat-matter-of-fact budget post.

The AAM calls the proposed limit on charitable deductions “harmful,” but Bloomington’s Michael Ruston disagrees. Notable is his alternative suggestion of an equitable tax credit that would apply across donors, begging the question: should people in higher tax brackers really recieve more credit than those in a lower tax bracket if they are donating the same amount of money?

Ed Ruscha, We the People, 2 color lithograph, 14 x 14”, Courtesy of Gemini G.E.L. and “Artists for Obama.”

Surprisngly absent from the AAM document is a mention of the $59 million dollar increase to the Smithsonian Institution to fund, amongst many other initatives, The National Museum of African American History and Culture.

We’re most excited about the $500,000 proposed for building a telescope in Greenland to scope some black holes, but with a riveting 230 pages of FY14 Budget Proposal, there’s bound to be something for everyone. Right?

Artist Creates Black Hole in Roger’s Park

Abigal Deville’s opening at Iceberg Projects this weekend was TO DIE FOR. Iceberg’s normally crisp gallery was lost to a literal whirlwind of materials collected from Roger’s Avenue and transformed by the artist. More than worth the trip to Roger’s Park.

See XXXXXX now so you can say you knew Deville’s work before it was in Venice.

April 27th, 11am– 9pm. At Roots & Cul­ture 1034 N Mil­wau­kee Ave.

Serv­ing a menu of brunch, lunch all day, and dinner.Brunch 11am-2pm. Din­ner 6pm-8pm. Kitchen closes at 8. 10 seats avail­able at a time. First come, first serve. BYOB. Veg­e­tar­i­ans, of course, are welcome!