Episode 391: Irena Knezevic

February 25, 2013 · Print This Article

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Irena Knezevic
This week: Duncan and Claudine talk to Chicago-based artist Irena Knezevic, whose show “Night of the World” at Alderman Exhibitions closed earlier this month. They discuss Knezevic’s background as a math genius and her involvement in the student activist movements in Serbia. There is some musing on the nature of evil. Artist Anna Shteynshleyger drops in and joins the conversation. Plus!! We hear live music by Irena and Joerg Becker, who perform selections from Knezevic’s limited edition record “Sailors Sing Suicide Songs.” Bourgeois notions of love are ridiculed. A good time is had by all.

Irena Knezevic works in various visual art formats, music, and architecture. Upcoming projects will be exhibited at New Projects, Chicago; Institute for Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; and Kunstraum München, Germany. For information on past exhibitions and selected projects, visit: http://allyouknowistrue.net/.
Jeremiah Chiu from Icy Demons is featured as “the guy on keyboards.”



Top 5 Weekend Picks! (2/4 – 2/6)

February 3, 2011 · Print This Article

1. Body Tempest at Fill in the Blank Gallery

A video installation by Allen Killian-Moore based on the life of Levi Nies.

Fill in the Blank Gallery is located at 5038 N. Lincoln Ave. Reception is Friday from 7-11pm.

2. Mono at Peregrineprogram

A group show of John Riepenhoff and friends, organized by Riepenhoff.

Peregrineprogram is located at 500 W. Cermak Rd., #727. Reception is Saturday from 3-6pm.

3. I am Not Superstitious at LVL3

Featuring the work of work by Ben Driggs, Veronica Rafael and Hans Peter Sundquist.

LVL3 is located at 1452 N Milwaukee Ave, #3. Reception is Saturday from 6-10pm.

4. Winter Experiment at moniquemeloche


Artist talk with Anna Shteynshleyger and Andreas Waldburg-Wolfegg

moniquemeloche is located at 2154 W Division St. Artist talk begins at 1pm.

5. Chris Naka and Min Song at Julius Cæsar


Works by Chris Naka and Min Song

Julius Cæsar is located at 3144 W Carroll Ave, 2G. Reception is Sunday from 1-4pm.




‘Winter Experiment’ at Monique Meloche Starts TODAY

January 15, 2011 · Print This Article

Ebony G. Patterson, installation detail

Ack, I meant to post this yesterday and totally forgot. Huge apologies, because this thing looks great – so many fantastic artists are involved in this show! But luckily there’s still time for you to catch the first of an ongoing “Winter Experiment” at Monique Meloche Gallery if you hop on by the space TODAY, Saturday, at 1pm to listen to the talk between Ebony G. Patterson & Tumelo Mosaka taking place in the gallery. They will have treats and hot drinks (provided by Letizia’s Natural Bakery), and Duncan will be on site recording this and all the other upcoming talks for Bad at Sports’ podcast, so stop by, hang out, and say hi to your friends! The full schedule of events follows….

Winter Experiment  -  Calendar of Events

Saturday January 15, 1pm: Ebony G. Patterson & Tumelo Mosaka

Patterson (Jamaican, born 1981, lives Lexington, KY/Kingston, Jamaica) will have a dynamic mixed-media installation that investigates Jamaican dance hall culture in the gallery’s window facing Division Street. Mosaka included Patterson in his 2007 exhibition Infinite Island: Contemporary Caribbean Art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art where he was formerly Associate Curator of Exhibitions. Recently, Mosaka has become the Contemporary Art Curator at the Krannert Art Museum, Champaign, Illinois. Patterson’s installation Gully Godz in Conversation-Conversations Revised I, II and III will continue through March 26 as our fourth on the wall project.

Saturday January 22, 1pm: Dan Gunn & Michelle Grabner
Gunn’s (American, born 1980, lives Chicago) paintings, sculptures, and installations investigate the power and perception of pattern and light as well as the roles of spatial and cultural context to the assignment of meaning in contemporary art. Michelle Grabner, who is an artist, curator, writer and the founder of The Suburban in Oak Park, taught Gunn at the School of the Art Institute, where she is Chair of the Painting and Drawing Department and where Gunn received his MFA in 2007. After the conversation, follow us for the opening of Grabner’s solo exhibition Like a rare morel at Shane Campbell Gallery.

Saturday January 29, 1pm: Ben Fain & Shannon Stratton
Fain (American, born London 1980, lives Chicago), who is best known for his controversial public-performances and parades, recently taught the course The Parade Float as Guerrilla Art in Northwestern’s Department of Art Theory and Practice. Stratton, the founder and Executive Director of local non-profit Threewalls, is intimately familiar with Chesterhill, OH, the location of Fain’s most recent parade and the subject of his current project. Together they will discuss this project along with new contexts for art making and exhibiting.

Saturday February 5, 1pm: Anna Shteynshleyger & Andreas Waldburg-Wolfegg
Shteynshleyger’s (Russian-American, born Moscow 1977, lives Chicago) photographs—portraits, still-lifes, landscapes, and interiors—display a historic sensitivity that is at once personal and political. Arts patron Waldburg-Wolfegg is on the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the International Committee of the Renaissance Society, where Shteynshleyger had solo exhibitions in 2004 and 2007 respectively. Shteynshleyger will be previewing some of her new work in progress.

Address: moniquemeloche
2154 W. Division Chicago IL 60622
t: 773.252.0299, f: 773.252.0899




Anna Shteynshleyger at The Renaissance Society

January 4, 2010 · Print This Article

Anna Shteynshleyger, Nylon Challah. 2004-2009

While I was looking at the photographs of Anna Shteynshleyger at the opening of this Russian-born, Chicago-based artist’s new solo exhibition at at The Renaissance Society, a middle-aged woman wearing a fluffy, faux-fur coat sidled up next to me. “Do you know what that is?” she asked me, pointing to the image I was peering at intently. It was a blue-tinged photograph of some sort of twisted, fleshy material that looked like raw bread dough.

“I’m not exactly sure,” I replied. “I can’t tell if it’s soaking in a bowl of something or what.”

“It looks organic,” the woman mused, “like an organ from a body.”

“Well, it’s challah….It’s not baked yet. But I can’t make out what this part is,” I said, gesturing to the circular, fan-like opening out of which the doughy form appeared to be rising.

“Oh, it’s challah!?” she exclaimed. “I know what challah is — I make challah. But that looks more like a body part. How do you pronounce the artist’s name?” I told her I had no idea, and she nodded. “She should have changed it to Smith!” Read more