ArtReview Reports on BaS NYC Gallery Show

April 27, 2010 · Print This Article

Chris Bors of ArtReview reports in on the Bad at Sports gallery show “Don’t Piss on Me and Tell Me It’s Raining” which has been up at Apexart Gallery in NYC since April 7th & will continue till May 22nd. In the review Mr. Bors comments on the relationship of the Art world to the internet & blogging especially. Pointing out Richard Flood’s recent statement at the Portland (Oregon) Art Museum about bloggers being prairie dogs; popping up one after another with no communication between themselves & no (editorial) oversight. A statement that one can debate the merits of but also one that Bad at Sports for over five years has been working to prove false.

In the review Mr. Bors recounts the history of Bad at Sports, the artists it has been lucky enough to work with over the years and the work they donated to be part of the gallery show. While also commenting on one piece in particular saying:

The liveliest work on view, however, is in apexart’s window, where a monitor shows animated credits listing Bad at Sports’s contributors. Created by B@S member Christopher Hudgens in the style of designer and filmmaker Saul Bass, well known for his masterful film titles, the retro graphics, limited animation and jazz soundtrack mesh seamlessly, while managing to get in a dig at Flood for good measure.

Bad at Sports would like to thank Mr. Bors for coming out to see the show and taking the time to review it. More so we want to thank every artist that was involved in the opening which in reality is nothing but an extention of the generous giving of time, ideas & energy those same people have shared with us for over 250 hours of interviews, talks, laughs & drinking since Bad at Sports first aired in 2005.




Bad at Sports Credits Animation

April 14, 2010 · Print This Article

As part of the Apexart Gallery show “Don’t Piss On My Leg & Tell Me It’s Raining” by Bad at Sports a animated credits crawl done in the style of the late great Saul Bass was created by Christopher Hudgens to showcase the spirit and members of Bad at Sports that make all of it possible. Thanks to everyone that came and enjoy.




Hobo Clown by Allison Schulnik

December 22, 2009 · Print This Article

The Mark Moore Gallery is having a solo exhibition of the work of Allison Schulnik open January 9th. Showcasing her second solo show there and her latest series of Hobo Clown inspired works. Below is a stop motion animation work done by the artist for Grizzly Bear’s latest music video. Enjoy.




Tuesday’s Video Pick | Dock Ellis & the LSD No No

November 17, 2009 · Print This Article

On this week’s pick we bring you James Blagden’s animation “Dock Ellis & the LSD No No”.  The short film chronicles Ellis’ infamous game where he pitched a no hitter while on LSD. Although the animation is entertaining, Ellis’ own account of the historic event is what really makes this video work.

via No Mas:

Sadly, the great Dock Ellis died last December at 63. A year before, radio producers Donnell Alexander and Neille Ilel, had recorded an interview with Ellis in which the former Pirate right hander gave a moment by moment account of June 12, 1970, the day he no-hit the San Diego Padres. Alexander and Ilels original four minute piece appeared March 29, 2008 on NPRs Weekend America. When we stumbled across that piece this past June, Blagden and Isenberg were inspired to create a short animated film around the original audio.

For more information please chec out No Mas.

Got a response to this post? Let us know! Email your comments to  mail@badatsports.com. We’ll feature thoughtful responses to issues generated by our posts in our Letters to the Editors Feature on Saturdays.




It’s Color Theory, Charlie Brown!

November 2, 2009 · Print This Article

Picture 41

A little mini brush-up on color theory and its uses in animation, by way of Bill Melendez’ beloved 1966 TV special It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown: this essay, written by L.A.-based animator Justin Hilden, contains a scene-by-scene analysis of the use of color on the special, focusing particularly on its emotional and dramatic effects. Read more