Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/25-7/27)

July 24, 2014 · Print This Article

1. Addendum at Chicago Artists Coalition

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Curated by John Marks and David Petersen, with work by Luke Aleckson, Allen Brewer, Casey Deming, Kristina Estell, Katelyn Farstad, Isa Gagarin, Peter Happel Christian, Jess Hirsch, Jonathan Kaiser, Tynan Kerr, Andie Mazorol, Ben Moren, Michael Mott, Stefanie Motta, Scott Nedrelow, Natasha Pestich, Andy Sturdevant, and Pamela Valfer.

Chicago Artists Coalition is located at 217 N Carpenter St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

2. Bookish at Corbett vs. Dempsey

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Work by Richard Artschwager, Sarah Canright, and Arturo Herrera.

Corbett vs. Dempsey is located at 1120 N. Ashland Ave. 3rd Fl. Reception Saturday, 3-6pm.

3. City Symphony in 16mm: A New Work for Expanded Cinema at Roman Susan

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Work by Sam Hoolihan and John Marks.

Roman Susan is located at 1224 W. Loyola Ave. Screening Saturday, 10pm-12am.

4. DOUBLE DARE ME at DfbrL8r

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Performance by Jessica Blinkhorn and Joseph Ravens.

DfbrL8r is located at 1136 N. Milwaukee Ave. Performance Friday, 8-10pm.

5. Here | Now at Design Cloud

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Curated by MK Meador, with work by Stacia Yeapanis and Jason Uriah White.

Design Cloud is locate at 118 N Peoria, Suite #2N. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.




Episode 341: Works Progress – Salon Saloon

March 13, 2012 · Print This Article

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This week: Duncan, Patricia and Richard talk to Andy Sturdevant, Shanai Matteson and Colin Kloecker who run/host/develop/ringmaster/coordinate/brainstorm Works Progress and the related project Salon Saloon from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Does Minnesota declare war on Oregon? Not for those who live in Portlandia with sensitive feelings, skip this episode and listen your Morrissey albums instead. Come back next week.




The Spectacular of Vernacular

June 24, 2011 · Print This Article

The Spectacular of Vernacular

Walker Art Center, Minneapolis

128 pp, $19.99

 

From January 29, through May 8, 2011 The Spectacular of Vernacular ran at the Walker Art Center in Min

neapolis, Minnesota. With 26 contemporary artists and more than 40 artworks included, Vernacular was sure to be fabulous. Sadly enough, I didn’t get the chance to see this show, which is why this little catalogue is such a gem. To be honest, I picked it up because of snazzy cover, a detail of Lari Pittman’s A Decorated Chronology of Insistence and Resignation #30. Exhibition catalogues are best when they do more than simply document what has already occurred, when they instead take on their own identity and become a book. The Spectacular of Vernacular achieves this, mostly through the three contextualizing essays.

The introductory essay by Darsie Alexander, chief curator at The Walker, divides the concept of vernacular into three broad categories (I’m paraphrasing here): Location, Ritualistic, Amateur. She then uses these parameters to specifically discuss many of the works included in the show. Her definition of vernacular runs from regional signage to faux-naïve thrift store art. Ultimately, I needed this essay to understand the connective tissue that linked these sometimes disparate pieces. For example the seemingly unrelated Beauty, by Jack Pierson and Marina Abramovic’s video Balkan Erotic Epic: Exterior Part 1 (B). After reading Alexander’s essay, I came to see the relationship–using that which already exists (or at least seems to) to create something new. Something in the family of found art, if you can call Abramovic’s use of ancient religious ritual “found.” I wonder what the viewer who didn’t read the essay thought about the selections.

The concluding two essays were interesting but not necessary to understanding the exhibit. “The Vernacular,” excerpted from the 1984 book Discovering the Vernacular Landscape, by John Brinckerhoff Jackson discusses architecture, particularly of small town America. The book concluded with Andy Sturdevant’s delightful essay “You Are Not Nowhere!: Visualizing the Heartland Vernacular.” In it, Sturdevant discusses the perception of the Midwest as “nowhere.” Funny and true.

Nestled between these essays are the images of the art itself. There are probably as many pages of text as there are of art. Each of the 26 artists is represented along with their statement. I was pleased to find William E Jones included in this exhibition. His 2009 piece, Killed, is a presentation of photographs commissioned by the Farm Security Administration (FSA). It was the policy of director Roy Stryker to punch a hole through the negative when a work was removed, or killed, from the collection. Jones presents these photographs complete with black void looming somewhere in the image. What is so interesting about these photos is that there is no explanation of why the image was killed, leaving the viewer to wonder just what about the photograph was unacceptable.

The other new work that caught my eye was Lorna Simpson’s Interior #1 and LA ’57—NY ’09. In these works both contain snapshots, home beauty photos really, of a young Los Angeles woman in the 50s. Alongside, Simpson has taken photos of herself in period clothes and in the same postures. Looking at the photos compelled me to wonder which was real, which was “authentic.” I spent quite a while scouring the images trying to identify what made some look old while others were surprisingly contemporary.

Besides, the found photography element of the works by Jones and Simpson, what also connects them is that both artists manage to get the viewer, or reader in this case, to engage with a photograph in a different from what was intended by the original photographer. In a new context, the pictures are given new life. These works, and by extension, this catalog, drove me to the internet to read more about many of the pieces included in the exhibition. To me this makes the catalogue a success in its own right.

The Spectacular of Vernacular continues on to Huston, Texas, July 23-September 18, 2011; Mont Clair, New Jersey, October 8- January 1, 2012; Chapel Hill, North Carolina, January 14-March 18, 2012.

 




The Art Strike: 1990-1993

June 2, 2009 · Print This Article

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Today, while trolling around the web. I found a link from Eyeteeth about Andy Sturdevant’s research into The Art Strike 1990-1993 on his blog South 12th.

“We call for all artists in the U.S. to put down their tools and cease to make, distribute, sell, exhibit or discuss their work from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 1993. We call for all galleries, museums, agencies, alternative spaces, periodicals, theaters, art schools etc., to cease all operations for the same period. Art is conceptually defined by a self-perpetuating elite and is marketed as an international commodity; the activity of its production has been mystified and co-opted; its practitioners have become manipulable and marginalized through self-identification with the term ‘artist’ and all it implies.’ – YAWN

The proposed early-’90s Art Strike is an interesting and largely forgotten footnote in contemporary art history. I encountered it for the first time while doing some research with back issues of Artpaper, the paper of record for the 1980s and ’90s art scene in Minneapolis-St. Paul. A full-page ad reproduced the text of YAWN’s inaugural broadsheet, and listed various resources one could write to learn more. Two ‘Action Committees’ — one in London, one in San Francisco — were listed, as well as YAWN’s mailing address in Iowa City, Iowa.”

view South 12th here
view Yawn’s site here