Top 5 Weekend Picks (7/8-7/10)

July 6, 2011 · Print This Article

1. Addendum & The Blind Light, the Pyre of Night at Linda Warren Gallery

Addendum features work by Jason Peot and The Blind Light, the Pyre of Night features work by Conrad Freiburg.

Linda Warren Gallery is located at 1052 W. Fulton Mkt. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

2. Space Out, Space In at Andrew Rafacz

Curated by Scott Wolniak. Work by Thorne Brandt, Ken Fandell, Young Joon Kwak, Jesse McLean, Shana Moulton, Jon Rafman, Andy Roche, Ben Russell, Jen Stark and Kirsten Stoltmann.

Andrew Rafacz Gallery is located at 835 W Washington Blvd. Reception is Saturday from 4-7pm.

3. People Don’t Like to Read Art at Western Exhibitions

Work by Nicholas Frank, Adriane Herman, John Parot, Mark Wagner, Joe Hardesty, Deb Sokolow, Rebecca Blakley, Elijah Burgher, Simon Evans, Cat Glennon, Meg Hitchcock, Rachel Foster, David Leggett, Andy Moore, and Angie Waller.

Western Exhibitions is located at 119 N. Peoria St., suite 2A. Reception Saturday from 6-9pm.

4. Samuel D. York at Courtney Blades

New works by Samuel D. York.

Courtney Blades is located at 1324 W Grand Ave. Reception is Friday from 7-10pm.

5. Part Wolf at What It Is

Work by Jacob Crose, Chris Holmes, and Vaughnda Johnson.

What It Is is located at 1155 Lyman. Reception Saturday from 3-8pm.  




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (5/20-5/22)

May 19, 2011 · Print This Article

1. FLAT 9 at Floor Length and Tux

Work by Kristen Romaniszak, Brandon Heuser, Catie Olson and EC Brown.

Floor Length and Tux is located at 2332 W Augusta Blvd, 3F. Reception Saturday from 7-10pm.

2. Empire at Andrew Rafacz Gallery

Work by Greg Stimac.

Andrew Rafacz Gallery is located at 835 W. Washington Blvd. Reception Saturday from 4-7pm.

3. Ceaseless Blooms in Jobless Colors at Johalla Projects

Work by Thomson Dryjanski, , Brandy Fisher, , Emerson Granillo, David M. Hall, Misato Inaba, Absis Minas, Jen Smoose, Jaroslaw Studencki, Kristen Lee Stokes, Eileen Mueller, Casey McGonagle, and Hyounsang Yoo.

Johalla Projects is located at 1561 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday from 7-10pm.

4. A Hostile Womb at EBERSMOORE

Work by Mark Mulroney.

EBERSMOORE is located at 213 North Morgan, #3C. Reception Friday from 6-9pm.

5. Talk is the object at iceberg projects

Work by Gregg Bordowitz

iceberg projects is located at 7714 N. Sheridan Rd. Reception is Saturday from 6-9pm. Artist talk at 7pm.

 

 




Top 5 Weekend Picks? Nope, but they have potential…

March 25, 2011 · Print This Article

Ok, so somehow this week devolved into madness, and here I am, to do a last minuet post for my weekly top 5. Being slightly indisposed at the moment, the top 5 pick is being scrapped this week for a longer list of: “Well, it looks like it has potential…” Enjoy!

Friday:

LIKE A ROCK: Tony Balko and Olivia Ciummo at ACRE Projects (1913 W 17th St) Reception 6-9pm.

Snowblind: Alex Blau at Firecat Projects (2124 N. Damen) Reception 7-10pm.

Launch of johallaprojects.com/ARTISTS at Johalla Projects (1561 N Milwaukee) Party from 7-10pm.

Drop It Like It’s Not at Murdertown (2351 N. Milwaukeee Apt #2) Reception 6-9pm.

Double Feature: The Art Dump at Post Family (1821 W. Hubbard S. Unit 202) Reception 7-11pm.

Saturday:

Anthotypes: John Opera at Andrew Rafacz Gallery (835 W Washington Blvd) Reception 4-7pm.

BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer) Chicago at Archer Ballroom (3012 S. Archer Ave. Apt #3) Reception 7-10pm.

BLUE GLUE AND OTHER EXPLORATIONS: Mara Baker at Happy Collaborationists Exhibition Space – (1254 N Noble St) Reception 6-10pm.

PSYCHA-BOBBLE: J. Thomas Pallas, Laura Davis, David Leggett and Elisa Harkins at High Concept Laboratories (1401 W. Wabansia) Reception 7pm-midnight.

Nobody to Have Any Fun With: Mac Katter, Dylan Cale Jones and Vanya Schroeder at SÃ¥ Gallery (2150 S Canalport Ave #4A-10) Reception 7:30-10:30pm.

WORK IN THE WOODS from SCARCITY asks, “IS THIS YOU, WANT?”: G. Vincent Gaulin at Spoke (119 N Peoria St.) Performance 6-8:30pm.

Sunday:

Zombie Apocalypse: Kimberly MacAulay, Anna Vlaminck, and Eric Cronin at Black Cloud Gallery (1909 S. Halsted St) Reception 6-10pm.

Eyeball Witness: Suitable Video Vol. 2 at Roots & Culture (1034 N Milwaukee Ave.) Screening at 7pm. $5.




Episode 264: Wendy White

September 19, 2010 · Print This Article

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Wendy White
This week on the Amanda Browder show, Amanda and her trusty side kick Tom visit Wendy White’s Brooklyn studio. The discuss Wendy’s paintings as she finishes up a bunch for her current exhibition at Andrew Rafacz gallery in Chicago. Amanda finally finds a painter that she likes in Wendy and Tom learns that Amanda is not a sculptor (as he had believed), but she in fact works in a new genre (to Tom) called “Fibers”.

Wendy White is a New York painter who has shown all over the world, including recent shows in New York, Madrid, Amsterdam, Tokyo, and even Omaha! Her work has been discussed and reviewed extensively by the art intelligencia in such publications as ArtForum, Art in America, The Brooklyn Rail, the Huffington Post and the Gay City News.




Interview with Ali Bailey

April 14, 2010 · Print This Article

Ali Bailey, "It's the Real Thing," installation view at Andrew Rafacz Gallery

I profiled Ali Bailey last year on the occasion of his solo debut in Chicago at Golden Gallery, an exhibition titled “You are Young” (the piece appeared in New City; you can read it here). Bailey is definitely what I’d consider to be ‘a comer.’ (Isn’t that a terrible word to apply to artists? It has such unfortunate equine associations). His works sold well at last year’s Next Fair at Art Chicago – no small feat in an extreme down market – and he’s already busted out with his second Chicago solo show, at Andrew Rafacz: a startling new body of work that he thinks is his most complicated to date. I agree. Bailey’s sculptures have changed a lot since his first exhibition, and I wanted to talk to him in greater depth about the progression from that last body of work to this one.  Sadly for Chicago, Bailey’s next big move is a geographic one: he’ll be setting up digs in Los Angeles soon because his wife, artist and curator Kristen Van Deventer, will be attending graduate school there. I am very grateful to Ali for taking the time to provide such well-considered answers to my often clumsy and inordinately detailed questions. His show continues through May 8th at Andrew Rafacz Gallery.

CI: The most obvious shift or change that’s apparent in your new body of work at Andrew Rafacz is that it is much more abstract than the group of sculptures shown at the “You Are Young” show at Golden last year. That earlier work drew upon recognizable and sometimes even iconic imagery: a basketball and a baseball, an ice cream cone, a tree stump covered in gum and graffiti. Your latest work still gives me the feeling that there are exterior referents at play but now they seem more art historical and less pop-cultural. For example, I saw in your use of the grey felt material in the piece East Meets West / Worked Out a little Beuys joke, I loved how it’s slung over a sculpture that looks like a looming, abstracted version of a Stairmaster or some other type of exercise equipment that quickly becomes ‘useless’ and soon comes to function primarily as a clothes hanger. Can you tell me a little bit about this shift between the two bodies of work — what have you been thinking about lately that’s caused this move towards less immediately recognizable forms?

AB: You’re right about there being a distinct move toward a more abstract language, both in terms of subject and form and in a way, this shift is a direct result of problems that I’ve created for myself. For me, the last body of work operated in two different ways and that was very important. On one level it was about objecthood in a broad sense, making (and the presence of the hand), and a kind of tension resulting from a push-pull dynamic between inherent contradictions in the work and a kind of Gober-esque uncanny. The other prominent characteristic of the work was a pop-cultural critique and I suppose that this is where you could talk about the poetic content and the more accessible qualities the works had. In these ways I think the work was successful. The thing that really didn’t work and this is what I’ve been battling with recently, is being able to convey a distancing or a kind of knowing-naivety or to set up a dialogue that talks about authenticity. In my mind, it was clear that what I was presenting was not authentic in any sense nor was it really concerned with being ‘truthful’ – I was trying to examine certain narrative tropes but instead ended up giving people an easy out – they often never got further than the narrative or the overt poetic strand of the idea. Read more