Top 10 Weekend Picks! (9/4-9/6)

September 3, 2015 · Print This Article

The long hot summer is over. The season is beginning again. Thus, for this week and next, we shall feature a Top 10 Picks! Enjoy.

Friday 9/4/15 – 

Algorithm Gerbils at Fernwey


Work by Alexander Valentine.

Fernwey is located at 916 N. Damen Ave. Reception 7-10pm.

FROOTS at Galerie F


Work by Chris Uphues, Buried Diamond, and Killer Acid.

Galerie F is located at 2381 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception 6-10pm.

Tertiary Dimensions at Sector 2337


Curated by Alexandria Eregbu with work by Aay Preston-Myint, Adam Liam Rose + Alex Zak, Amina Ross, Betsy Odom, Elijah Burgher, Gordon Hall, Katie Vota, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Margaret Bobo-Dancy, Matt Morris, Oli Rodriguez, and Rami George.

Sector 2337 is located at 2337 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception 5-8pm.

Garcia, Rios + Romero at Trunk Show

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Work by Anthony Romero, Josh Rios and Eric J. Garcia.

Trunk Show is located at 1859 W. 19th St. Reception 6-8pm.

Saturday 9/5/15 – 

What Would Barbara Do? at Defibrillator Gallery

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Curated by Joseph Ravens, Oli Rodriguez and Frederic Moffet with work by Miao Jiaxin, Zachary Harvey, Caitlin Bacon, Whitney Johnston, Charles Lum, Barbara DeGenevieve, Amber Hawk Swanson, Kean O’Brien and Isaac Leung.

Defibrillator Gallery is located at 1463 W. Chicago Ave. Reception 7-10pm.

Cohen + Ruiz at Roots and Culture

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Work by Alex Bradley Cohen and Steve Ruiz.

Roots and Culture is located at 1034 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception 6-9pm.

Their, Their at Slow Pony Project

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Work by Local Honey.

Slow Pony Project is located at 1745 W. 18th St. Reception 6-9pm.

Finocchio at The Franklin


Curated by Scott J Hunter with work by Daniel Baird, Jessica Caponigro, Alexandria Eregbu, Danny Giles, Sofia Moreno, Matt Morris, Amina Ross, Alfredo Salazar-Caro, Ivan Lozano and Dan Paz.

The Franklin is located at 3522 W. Franklin Blvd. Reception 6-10pm.

A short and pleasurable journey at Vertical Gallery

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Work by Collin van der Sluijs, Mike Perry, Cody Hudson, Daniel Frost, Hedof, Jordy van den Nieuwendijk, Amanda Marie, David Shillinglaw and more.

Vertical Gallery is located at 1016 N. Western Ave. Reception 6-10pm.

Sunday 9/6/15 – 

Warm Kitty, Soft Kitty at Hyde Park Art Center

Eliza Bennett - A Woman's Work Is Never Done - film still5

Work by D. Denenge Akpem, Eliza Bennett, Laci Coppins and Nakia Gordon, Alexandria Eregbu, Isaac Facio and Benedickt Diemer, Whitney Huber, Taylor Hokanson and Dieter Kirkwood, Cole Don Kelley, Barbara Layne, Hiro Murai for Flying Lotus, Tameka J. Norris, Betsy Odom, Scout Paré-Phillips, Jennifer Ray, Aileen Son and Fo Wilson.

Hyde Park Art Center is located at 5020 S. Cornell Ave. Reception 3-5pm.


Top 5 Weekend Picks! (8/22-8/24)

August 21, 2014 · Print This Article

1. The Square Root of Pi(e) at Chicago Artists Coalition

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Work by Rami George, Dan Paz, Jenyu Wang and Alexandria Eregbu.

Chicago Artists Coalition is located at 217 N. Carpenter St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

2. Almost Ergonomic at Studio 424


Curated by Third Object, with work by Alex Chitty, Laura Hart Newlon, Kate O’Neill, David Bhodi Boyland, and Jeff Prokash.

Studio 424 is located at 167 North Racine Avenue, Suite 1. Reception Saturday, 5-9pm.?

3. Retreat at Richard Gray Gallery

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Curated by Theaster Gates, with work by Derrick Adams, Erika Allen, Elizabeth Axtman, Bethany Collins, Tony Lewis, Kelly Lloyd, Valerie Piraino, Mitchell Squire, Wilmer Wilson IV and Nate Young.

Richard Gray Gallery is located at 875 N. Michigan, Ste. 3800. Reception Friday, 5-7pm.

4. Iffy Conditions at Garden Apartment Gallery


Curated by Daniel Bruttig, with work by Boris Ostrerov, Erin Thurlow, Frank Pollard, George Blaha, Jessie Mott, Joe Cassan, Julia Klein, Kelly Kaczynski, Lauren Carter, Mike Schuh, Paul Nudd, Peter Fagundo, Scott Wolniak, and Shane Huffman.

Garden Apartment Gallery is located at 3528 W. Fulton Blvd. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.

5. Fetish at Defibrillator Gallery


Work by Dani Ploeger.

Defibrillator Gallery is located at 1136 N. Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday, 8-11pm.

Top 4 Weekend Picks! (2/28-3/2)

February 27, 2014 · Print This Article

1. Bare Bones at The Franklin


Work by Chris Bradley, Sarah & Joseph Belknap, Max Henry Boudman, Veronica Bruce, Holly Cahill, C. C. Ann Chen, Laura Davis, Jovencio de la Paz, Alexandria Eregbu, Karolina Gnatowski, Jacob C. Hammes, Michelle Ann Harris, Cameron Harvey, Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford, Victoria Martinez, Bobbi Meier, Andrew Nordyke, Dan Paz and Michael Alan Kloss.

The Franklin is located at 3522 W. Franklin Blvd. Reception Saturday, 6-9pm.

2. TYPEFORCE 5 at Co-Prosperity Sphere

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Work by Ade Hogue, Alex Fuller, Andy Detskas, Anne Benjamin, Brad VEtter, Brian Pelsoh, Brian Steckel, Chris Fritton, Craig Malmrose, Dan Elliott, Derek Crowe, Drew Tyndell, Edwin Jager, Franklyn, Gautam Rao, Jack Muldowney, Jen Farrell, Jeremy DeBor, Jim Moran, Jinhwan Kim, John Pobojewski, Kim Knoll, Kyle Letendre, Lisa Beth Robinson, Magdelena Wistuba, Mary Bruno, Matt Wizinsky, Megan Deal, Megan Pryce, Mike McQuade, Richard Zeid, Rick Valicenti, Shawna X, Stephanie Carpenter, Timothy Alamillo, Todd King, Veronica Corzo-Duchardt, Whit Nelson and William Boor.

Co-Prosperity Sphere is located at 3219 S. Morgan St. Reception Friday, 6:30-11pm.

3. Objects at Roman Susan


Work by Mia Capodilupo, Tulika Ladsariya, Matt Martin, Marissa Neuman, Kasia Ozga, Katherine Perryman, Daniel Schmid and Ruby Thorkelson.

Roman Susan is located at 1224 W. Loyola Ave. Reception Saturday, 7-10pm.

4. Shock of the Gently Used at Firecat Projects

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Work by Dru Hardy, Mary Lou Novak and Kristina Smith.

Firecat Projects is located at 2124 N. Damen Ave. Reception Friday, 7-10pm.

Top 5 Weekend Picks! (3/29)

March 28, 2013 · Print This Article

1. Black Venus is on Fire! at Gagosian’t

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Work by Alexandria Eregbu.

Gagosian’t is located at 60 E. Monroe St. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

2. THE CHURCH of CONTEMPORARY ART (CoCA) at Defibrillator Gallery


Work by Jessica Allee, Stephanie Jardin, Wago Kreider, Jay Needham, Angela Watters, Nico Wood, Andrea Baldwin, and Cole Robertson.

Defibrillator Gallery is located at 1136 N. Milwaukee Ave. Performance Friday at 8pm. $10.

3. Johnny at Heaven Gallery


Work by Claire Valdez, Charles Fogarty, and Ilene Godofsky.

Heaven Gallery is located at 1550 N. Milwaukee Ave. 2nd Fl. Reception Friday, 7-11pm.

4. HERZOGOUDREAULT at Lloyd Dobler Gallery


Work by Jacob Goudreault and Alexander Herzog.

Lloyd Dobler Gallery is located at 1545 W. Division, 2nd Fl. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.

5. Surrounded at Roman Susan


Work by AMTK, Rine Boyer, Michael Burmeister, Stephanie Del Carpio, Inah Choe, Melanie Deal, Predrag Djordjevic, Mary Flack, Gabriel Garcia, Anna Goraczko, Kim Guare, Jennifer Hines, Cynthia Hsieh, Joanne Jongsma, Brandy Kraft, Amy Kuttab, Tulika Ladsariya, Jessica Lucas, Lorette Luzajic, Deanna Mance, John McLaughlin, Gülşah Mursaloğlu, Klaus Pinter, Rhett Gérard Poché, Clare Rosean, Jake Saunders, Ashley Allen Short, Wade Thompson, Ruby Thorkelson, Polly Yates, and Christopher Zanoni.

Roman Susan is located at 1224 W. Loyola Ave. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.

Exhibition Review: “Mythologies” at SAIC’s Sullivan Galleries

December 14, 2012 · Print This Article

Upon entering the exhibition space of “Mythologies,” an excellent showing of artwork produced by six young artists at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Sullivan Galleries, the eye is almost instinctually drawn to the bold, blood red palette of Rashayla Marie Brown‘s video installation “Puro Teatro (Coming to Theatres).” Projected large upon the far wall of the gallery, the single-shot, still-frame video elegantly documents what appears to be the meditative staging of a soon to occur evocation. Brown’s hands extend from beyond the frame to light three white votive candles placed in a triangular formation on the red surface, later joined by the slow setting of a steel incense burner, rosary beads, and the black winding cord of a microphone. The video is accompanied by the tune “Puro Teatro,” meaning ‘pure theatre,’ performed by Latin soul and salsa singer La Lupe in the 1960s. La Lupe was a known practicer of Santería at the time of the song’s recording, and the romantic drama of her singing coupled with the ritualistic imagery Brown has produced certainly evokes the sensation of saints being summoned.

Installation View, "Mythologies." From L to R: Black Motif by Cameron Welch, All American (Banner Series) by Alexandria Eregbu, and Puro Teatro (Coming to Theatres) & Pomba Gira (Deja Vu) by Rashayla Marie Brown

Installation View, “Mythologies.” From L to R: Black Motif by Cameron Welch, All American (Banner Series) by Alexandria Eregbu, and Puro Teatro (Coming to Theatres) & Pomba Gira (Deja Vu) by Rashayla Marie Brown

Indeed, preceding the video spatially are three artworks intent on making explicit the theme organizing the included artworks altogether: a contemporary consideration, and continuation, of black aesthetics from a political, art-historically informed subject-position. “Black Motif,” a 7 by 6.5 foot mixed-media painting on cotton by Cameron Welch, features a golden, protruding mask in the style of African ancestral objects (or commercial knock-offs thereof) surrounded by layered, clashing colors and patterns of different kente cloths that the artist has painted asymmetrically into a patchwork composition. Neighboring the painting is “All American (Banner Series)” by Alexandria Eregbu, a triptych of bedazzled vinyl wall-hangings heralding famed contemporary black artists Kara Walker, Kehinde Wiley, and Mickalene Thomas as though they are college sports stars. Mirroring these works is “Pomba Gira (Deja Vu),” an installation by Brown replicating the aesthetic of her aforementioned video in three dimensional form, but instead featuring a vinyl LP copy of Beyonce and Jay-Z’s hit song “Deja Vu” suspended over two self-portraits the artist intentionally produced in the style of Lorna Simpson.

L to R: Cameron Welch, Mispelled Agression (one of two in the series), 2012, and Christina A. Long, Miss Jessie's Exuberant Hues & Henry Just a Hater, 2012

L to R: Cameron Welch, Mispelled Agression (one of two in the series), 2012, and Christina A. Long, Miss Jessie’s Exuberant Hues & Henry Just a Hater, 2012

Images of earlier, though none too far gone, eras permeate throughout “Mythologies.” Elsewhere in the exhibition, Welch paints black and white appropriated civil rights era imagery for the diptych “Misspelled Aggression,” hanging the companion artworks across from one another like mirror images. Scrawling the words ‘nigga please’ over a photorealistic rendering of civil rights leader Stokely Carmichael mid-speech, and the words ‘nigger police’ over an image of attack dogs being used against black protestors in the 1963 Birmingham, AL, “race riots;” Welch’s large-scale paintings of bold aggression (both state-sponsored and grass-roots resistant) make enormous and unavoidable the persistent issue of racial violence and the failures of binary ‘riot vs. revolution’ understanding. Photographer David Alekhuogie similarly investigates the mediation of racial violence, but with more of a critical orientation towards the marketing and mass-manufacture of stereotyped black male aggression. In a stunning photo simply titled “Beef,” Alekhuogie places a super-sized McDonald’s cheeseburger (and Monopoly themed bag) at the center of two posters hanging on a deep blue bedroom wall, one of Notorious B.I.G. and the other featuring Tupac as the star of the 1992 gangsta film Juice. The work produces a thoughtful visual metaphor for the corporate profiteering of engineered black-on-black violence. In the exhibition’s most contemporary reference, Alekhuogie places a mass-produced ceramic head labeled ‘Africa, Cameroon’ purchased from a local art supply store, featuring generically racialized facial characteristics, within a pale grey hoodie now indissociable from the image of Trayvon Martin for a photograph the artist provocatively titles “Self Portrait (Africa, Cameroon).”

David Alekhuogie, Beef, 2012

David Alekhuogie, Beef, 2012

It is a compelling commingling of artworks: expansive in its time-lapsing pastiche of (art-)historical and pop-cultural references, polymorphous in its inclusivity of art forms (video, painting, textile, photography) typically segregated museologically. Additionally, “Mythologies” adds an interesting, youthful dimension to conversations currently about the importance and relevancy of identity-themed group exhibitions at a time when post-structural criticality and neoliberal pipe-dreams of being ‘post-whatever‘ threatens to make irrelevant concerns over specific authorship. This is particularly so in the wake of the much maligned New York Times review of “Now Dig This! Art & Black Los Angeles 1960-1980” at MoMA PS1 by critic Ken Johnson, who reductively oversimplifies the insurgent artistic strategies of assemblage (while assuming it to be an exclusively white tradition) and insipidly criticizes a portion of that show for perceived failures in the Modernist ideal of universal aesthetic communication, as though that’s the primary artistic motivation behind producing (and promoting), for instance, gnarly, gorgeous, challenging artworks made with detritus collected from the Watts Rebellion.

Alexandria Eregbu, All American (Banner Series), 2012

Alexandria Eregbu, All American (Banner Series), 2012

What the content of “Mythologies” seem to be suggesting, instead, is that the formation of group exhibitions linked to the theme of identity offers a powerful means by which to outline, preserve, contextualize, build upon, and (as this exhibition especially makes clear) assert one’s own artwork as participating within a specific aesthetic lineage. This is, perhaps, why Beyonce and Jay-Z’s “Deja Vu” on vinyl (something contemporary being delivered through the media of an earlier era) makes for such an ample metaphor within Brown’s Lorna Simpson-quoting installation, and for the entire exhibition furthermore. It is why Welch’s and Alekhuogie’s respective aesthetic investigations of the evolving mass-mediation of racial violence transcend disciplinarity. It is also why the tongue-in-cheek cheeriness of Eregbu’s banners feels so sincere, if also abundantly fan-girl self aware. The works seem produced as knowing, generative gestures of willful apprenticeship derived from self-tailored canons of influence made available and immediate, at last.

Mythologies,” featuring the work of David Alekhuogie, Rashayla Marie Brown, Alexandria Eregbu, Christina A. Long, Hannah Rodriguez, and Cameron Welch, is open now through January 8, 2013, at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Sullivan Galleries (33 S. State Street, Seventh Floor).