EDITION #19

November 6, 2013 · Print This Article

Work by Philip von Zweck

a long line

FULL DISCLOSURE: I would have written about it anyway but I am honored happen to be in the exhibition.

It was a sad day in Chicago when she woke up to the news that Edmund Chia was gone and not coming back. In his absence Chia left a long line “of text, broken up into 43 parts and distributed to artists for their interpretation, none of whom are privy to the complete document.” The result, a long line, came together in a seamless transition to new Peregrine directors, Claire Valdez and Jon Waites.

a long line, Peregrine Program

Valdez and Waites’ pairing of the mostly modest sized works have some fantastic isolated moments while maintaining a flow throughout the space as a whole. For those curious, the gallery sheet revealed the lines assigned to each artist. It’s an interesting mix to say the least. Pieces in direct response to their line, such as Ang Bidak’s butter application and Philip von Zweck’s chilling response to his line really engaged the poem and forces one to consider the individual line. Connor Creagan’s response to the line “art brings people apart, right” was a sweet twist on an FGT-like pile with neon green wristbands. Each wristband had a matching code buried in the pile.

a long line, Peregrine Program

Work by Connor Creagan

a long line, Peregrine Program

Of course there were a few works that felt dropped in to the show, unrelated to the text, though surprisingly few considering the scope. All in all, an exhibition befitting the Peregrine founder and a good sign for what is to come.

a long line, Peregrine Program

a long line, Peregrine Program

a long line is on view at Peregrine Programs (3311 W Carroll Avenue, #119) through November 24, 2013.

The Weatherman Report

Vincent Van Gogh, The Mullberry Tree, 1889 (oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm). Image courtesy of the Norton Simon Art Foundation.

What’s the T?‘s First Annual Halloween Costume Awards

Screw ArtNews’ Top 100 List and if you won best gallery inside your mom’s pantry from NewCity, here are the awards that really matter!

Saddest Clown Award

Scariest Costume Award

Goes to Andrew Rafacz, obvi.

The Most OooOOoooAWwWWooOOOOoooAGHGHH Award

Most Understated Costume Award

Best Use of a Wire Hanger Award


Best Use of Your Arm as a Prop Award


Best Hair Award

If you didn’t win this year, it’s time to start planning for next Halloween, kitties! Think you deserve better? Let me know!

TRENDING

If you haven’t noticed recently, EVERYONE is freaking naked all of a sudden! In the past couple of weeks there have been no less than three exhibitions that feature nudity prominently, but unlike most trends, this is one we hope won’t go away.

Work by Nick Johnson, on view at document

Work by Jonathan Gardner, on view at Corbett Vs Dempsey

Work by Elijah Burgher, on view at Western Exhibitions

I’ve also been whispers about Hardcore Craft trending in Chicago. Next thing you know, even Net Art will be trending.




MADAME ROSA’S CABINET OF CURIOSITIES

October 31, 2013 · Print This Article

curiosities-poster-731x1024

Join us if you dare for a Halloween scare…….

 

A Halloween Party to Benefit ACRE

Friday, November 1st, 8pm-midnight

Heaven Gallery
1550 N Milwaukee Ave-Ticket Prices-

VIP: $100 
includes special Halloween gift bag of curious treats, 5 raffle tix & open bar all night
General Admission: $25 
includes 3 raffle/drink tix
Student/ACRE Alum: $15

This Halloween, ACRE invites you to eat, drink and be scary at our annual benefit at Heaven Gallery. No mere mortal could resist this thrilling evening of drinking, dancing and mischief-making! Featuring devilish cocktails by Hornswaggler,Revolution brews and a black-light inspired menu from our very own kitchen witches, this will be a Halloween to remember. Bid on artist-made raffle items from our unique Cabinet of Curiosities (curated by ACRE, Allison Quinn Peters & Tricia Van Eck) or let your soul be possessed on the dance floor by Brian Kirkbride’s special horror film-inspired DJ set and the ghouls from Chances Dances. Before the night is through, you’ll be bewitched by burlesque dancer Red Rum,  frightened by the antics of the mystical Sanjula and mesmerized by palm reader Mister Vibe. Come dressed in your best costume and be ready to howl and party all night!

Purchase tickets in advance at: www.artful.ly/store/events/1792

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:

Newcity
Revolution Brewing




The EXPO Register, September 19-22, 2013

September 21, 2013 · Print This Article

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Friday, September 20th Edition of The EXPO Register

September 20, 2013 · Print This Article

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Week in Reivew: Worlding and Labor Day

September 2, 2013 · Print This Article

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This week in the podcast realm of Bad at Sports: I had the great opportunity to sit down and talk with Claire Doherty in Portland this last May. Doherty was a keynote speaker at Open Engagement where we met. She initiated Situations, where is is currently the Director, in 2003 following a ten-year period investigating new curatorial models beyond conventional exhibition-making at a range of art institutions including Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, Spike Island, Bristol and FACT (Foundation of Art and Creative Technology), Liverpool. Listen to our discussion about art in public space, alternative models for funding and curatorial practices here.

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Edition #16 came in this week with notes about the magnetic field of Roger’s Park galleries, the pilot episode of “Better Luck Next Time,” (a newlyweds-style game show for artistic duos), dispatches from ACRE, and noted recent popularity of the sahrong. That and much much more here.

Proteus-Summer

Paul King kicked things off on Monday with a vivid description of Protues, an a-typical, evocative video game:

To move past the title screen and into the game, you begin by clicking the silhouette of a distant island. After fading, the screen opens from a murky black into a gently disappearing elliptical shape, as though you were slowly opening your eyelids. You’ve awoken in what appears to be an endless ocean, a muted sea-green punctuated by the gentle lapping of white reflections. In the distance, you begin to make out the outline of a shrouded landmass. As you trudge towards it, the only anchor in the game’s ceaseless sea, you can practically feel the sunlight of the raincoat-yellow orb shining in the sky.

Everything in Proteus is rendered in a blocky, colorful style that should be familiar to everyone who’s ever seen an early pixelated video game. (Think the “ball” of pong, or the sharp edges of Mario.) But the style isn’t due to a lack of processing power or graphical method; instead, the world’s lack of texture translates into a picturesque canvas of flat colors, almost as though you were gazing directly into a visual interpretation of one of Brian Eno’s ambient tracks.

Hilleströminre

This week, James Pepper Kelly submits The Greatest Proposal for hi-fiving high culture, via an imaginary embodiment of Judith H. Dobrzynski and James Durston:

Imagine that a writer named Judith H. Dobrzynski boards a plane. She’s ambivalent about her recent op-ed for the New York Times, “High Culture Goes Hands-On,” in which she mourned the loss of a classic, passive museum experience. The response was decent (63 comments and a spot on the “most-emailed” list), and the negative response didn’t go much beyond baseless ad hominems (“crank,” “elitist”). But real-world impact? Judy sighs. She tries not to think about institutions these days, their obsequious rush to digitize, crowdsource, and create a “fun experience” for all. Instead, she thinks about real change: about her upcoming fellowship at the Salzburg Global Seminar in Austria, and how she helped influence the country’s new Holocaust restitution laws. Judy sinks back into her business class seat (being a Fellow has perks!), orders a tomato juice and relaxes, thinking of all the reading she’ll be able to catch up on in the air.

Image courtesy Chris Stain

Image courtesy Chris Stain

Juliana Driever interviewed Chris Stain who’s “characteristic large-scale murals evolved out of his practice as a graffiti writer, and stand today as a kind of contemporary nod to WPA-era portraiture, featuring the faces and plights of everyday people in all of their affecting, confrontational realism.” When asked about how graffiti has changed since the 80′s, and whether there is a difference between graffiti and street art, Stain replied:

In one sense it’s all art but there are different energies to what is known as “graffiti,” mostly lettering based primarily using aerosol paint, and “street art” which runs the gamut of various mediums. As for the letter-based movement, it has changed quite a bit since the 80’s. Technically, its reached levels unimagined back then through the help of all the newer spray paints on the market with lower pressure and cap options. The introduction of the internet helped styles develop more rapidly as it was easier to access photos from all over the world, get new ideas, and spark creativity.

"Self-Mythology" at Roman Susan. Work by Vincent Troia. Roman Susan is located at 1224 W. Loyola Ave. Reception Saturday, 7-10pm

“Self-Mythology” at Roman Susan. Work by Vincent Troia.
Roman Susan is located at 1224 W. Loyola Ave. Reception Saturday, 7-10pm

Top 4 Weekend Picks with love from Stephanie Burke!

Duncan-MacKenzie-2013-courtesy-of-Bad-at-Sports1-e1377720263560

I reposted an interview with EXPO’s Stephanie Cristello, and Bad at Sports’ own, Richard Holland and Duncan MacKenzie. They discuss the upcoming newsprint publication Dana Bassett is spearheading, exactly how much gossip said paper will contain, and the interviews Bad at Sports will be conducting on site at the art fair:

Duncan MacKenzie and Richard Holland of Bad at Sports are two of the best in town to talk with about art. Known for their witty commentary and contemporary art talk platform Bad at Sports, they are most admired for their weekly podcasts and blog. The three of us sat down to discuss their involvement with EXPO/2013 – the recent venture of a newspaper that will be distributed throughout the fair spearheaded by What’s the T?columnist Dana Bassett entitled The EXPO Register, and the live interviews they will be fielding from their booth next to the /Dialogues stage. The lineup for this year’s panel is impressive, titled “One-on-One,” just one of many sports puns, MacKenzie and Holland will be in conversation with gallerists, directors, and curators, such as Solveig Øvstebø of the Renaissance Society, Elysia Borowy-Reeder of the MOCAD Detroit, and Director Charlie James, as well as artists William Powhida, José Lerma, and Sanford Biggers. While the details of these interviews are kept secret (you will just have to see them in person to find out), our conversation breaches the extent of Bad at Sports coverage at the fair, their plans for the paper, and MacKenzie and Holland’s bucket list – like an interview about interviews, or something along those lines.

Zachary Cahill, "Iridescent Mann."

Zach  Cahill, “Iridescent Mann.”

Monica Westin interviewed Zach Cahill about the third and final installment of  ”his epic USSA 2012 project,” presently on view at the Smart Museum and now called USSA 2012: Wellness Center: Idyllic—affair of the heart. In this interview Cahill composes as imaginary travel brochure for the USSA, flowers on facebook, and art mourning:

I mean I very much like the direct experience of being in front of an art work, but I enjoy being haunted by art works too…a visceral quality that occurs with the work of some of my favorite artists…they infect me and I can’t stop thinking about it…Ideally, I’d like my work to do both: give off an affecting sensation for the viewer and to haunt them after they walk away from it… my work wants to have its cake and eat to…. 

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And last but not least, I posted a series of upcoming opportunities including the call for Anchor Graphics’ Artist in Residency program at Columbia College. That and much more here.