Sir Robert J. Loescher: 1937 – 2007

January 9, 2008 · Print This Article

Robert J Loecher
Sir Robert J. Loescher, 70, died on December 8, 2007.

Mr. Loescher was Professor Emeritis at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and founder of SAIC Art History Department. He was knighted in 1990 by King Juan Carlos, of Spain.

He was preceded in death by his parents and his infant brother, George. He is survived by his brothers, Thomas Loescher, of Tucson, Arizona, and Richard Loescher, of Appleton, Wisconsin; friends, Shay DeGrandis, Nathan DeFoor, Brian Sikes and Bibiana Suarez, of Chicago; Joyce Neimanas, of Albuquerque; Wendy Woon, of New York; and many other colleagues and friends.

A memorial service to honor Sir Robert Loescher, in conjunction with the Midwest Art History Society Conference, will be held on April 4, 2008, at the Gene Siskel Film Center.

Robert J. Loescher, a specialist in Spanish and Latin American art, helped revolutionize the art history program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he taught for more than 30 years.

Mr. Loescher, 70, died in his Lake View home Saturday, Dec. 8, having had suffered from heart problems and was weakened by a recent operation.

Richard & Sarah had the pleasure of knowing and working with Mr. Loescher and will miss him greatly.

Brian and Marc review Tony Lebat’s “Bulk”

January 8, 2008 · Print This Article

Tony Labatt

Brian and Marc recently collaborated on a review of Tony Lebat’s Bulk at Queens Nails Annex for Shotgun Review. Here’s an excerpt:

“Tony Labat’s exhibition Bulk opened to throngs of art students, smoking and drinking on the sidewalk. At first, the event seemed like any other gallery reception. However, as a show focusing on the manifestation of social relations in an art event, the students hadn’t come to see anything in particular, but to rather simply be with one another. With the gallery’s main space converted to a bar, complete with amateur bartenders, swill cocktails at criminal prices, and makeshift wooden tables; Bulk turned Queens Nails Annex into a speakeasy, one built like a cheap theatrical set.

Bulk’s events have drawn together those who share in a common perspective – art students, gallerists, curators, etc.- participating in their prescribed roles of social exchange and power dynamics, as if the events had a written script. The exhibition doesn’t challenge itself to compose the audience, who provide its labor, or translate their efforts into meaning. Any examination into the relationship between the mechanics of audience as a means of production, and how it conditions the possibilities of interpretation, is absent. Without intervention, the events emerged as expected; codified and rigid. Creating work that fosters social relations shouldn’t reduce an event to the calling together of a coterie, turning the artist into a socialite of aesthetics whose practice would be a chain of well-hosted shin-digs. Bulk is emblematic of this festivalist, lackadaisical attitude that’s far too common in contemporary art.”

The full review can be found on Shotgun Review. This writing is an extension of a survey of the San Francisco art scene Brian wrote for Artnet.

Informative Video of Duncan’s Homeland

January 7, 2008 · Print This Article

From everyone at BaS we all wish the King of Canada the best on now being part of North America and with his work to restore the National Parliament Igloo building.

New York Magazine: Year in Art Review

December 14, 2007 · Print This Article

New York Magazine
New York Magazine has published their “Best in Art 07″ with their choices for the top shows in 10 different categories as well as Best Debut and Failure.

Debatable highlights include:

Best Show: Matthew Barney’s performance with Dog, Band, Bull, Urine & ’67 Chrysler

Freshest Century-Old Painting: Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon turned 100

Best New Scene: The Lower East Side Gallery District aka the last cheap place in Manhattan for real estate

Read them all here and let the argument begin.

David Robbins is Still Funnier Then You

December 14, 2007 · Print This Article

Now there are a lot of reasons to love David Robbins. His book is great. He is very funny. He is genuinely insightful about art and life.
He was really hard on Duncan as a student.
He looks great in scarves.

And he might be right on about how creative individuals can move forward and abandon an art world that only loves its devotees and acolytes(and it only sort of loves them.) But my favorite reason to LOVE David is that he made these…